IEEE Albuquerque Section

IEEE
January 25th, 2015

On January 21st, Dr. Jose Luis Cruz-Campa, a very successful scientist with Sandia National Laboratories, here in Albuquerque, presented the talk Miniaturization effects of solar cell: Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics as part of the IEEE Albuquerque Section, Sigma Xi series of Distinguished Public Talks.

The talk took place at the UNM Conference Center in the Continuing Education building. Dr. Cruz-Campa went into a very informative presentation on the role that micro electronics systems are having in improving the performance of photovoltaic materials. In particular, Dr. Cruz-Campa, talked about three types of photovoltaic systems, thin film, polycrystalline, and condenser, and how leveraging the use of micro electronics systems and fabrication techniques have led to breakthrough level of efficiency.

Dr. Cruz-Campa was the recipient of the 2014 Outstanding Young Engineer award for our Section for his contributions to the area of photovoltaics. He received the award at the awards banquet last May.

IMAG1451
Dr. Jose Luis Cruz-Campa delivering his talk.

IMAG1449
Another part of Dr. Cruz-Campa talk.

This the list of upcoming talks in the series:

The Search for Habitable Worlds By Debra Fisher, Yale University. Thursday, 19 February 2015

Stimulating Science: Caffeinated Drinks in the Prehispanic American Southwest By Patricia L. Crown, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, University of New Mexico. Thursday, 19 March 2015

What’s a Nice Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This? Pursuing the Jabberwock Across the Mud, the Slime, and the Rest of the Galaxy By Penny Boston, NM Tech. Thursday, 16 April 2015

For more information, contact Jackie Ericksen, jhericksen@msn.com

Thank you.

Gilberto (Chair)


January 25th, 2015

On January the 20th, The Mind Research Network and IEEE Engineering in Medicine & Biology Society hosted a talk by Dr. Constantinos S. Pattichis, Ph.D., Department of Computer Science, University of Cyprus, Cyprus on Multiscale Amplitude-Modulation Frequency-Modulation (AM-FM)Texture Analysis of Multiple Sclerosis in Brain MRI Images

This presentation introduced the use of multiscale amplitude modulation-frequency modulation (AM-FM) texture analysis of multiple sclerosis (MS) using magnetic resonance (MR) images from brain. The motivation for this work is that clinically, there is interest in identifying potential associations between lesion texture and disease progression, and in relating texture features with relevant clinical indexes, such as the expanded disability status scale (EDSS). Dr. Pattichis’ talk presented results from a longitudinal study that explored the application of 2-D AM-FM analysis of brain white matter MS lesions to quantify and monitor disease load.

To this end, MS lesions and normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) from MS patients, as well as normal white matter (NWM) from healthy volunteers, were segmented on transverse T2-weighted images obtained from serial brain MR imaging (MRI) scans (0 and 6-12 months). The instantaneous amplitude (IA), the magnitude of the instantaneous frequency (IF), and the IF angle were extracted from each segmented region at different scales. The findings suggest that AM-FM characteristics succeed in differentiating 1) between NWM and lesions; 2) between NAWM and lesions; and 3) between NWM and NAWM. A support vector machine (SVM) classifier succeeded in differentiating between patients that, two years after the initial MRI scan, acquired an EDSS ? 2 from those with EDSS 2 (correct classification rate = 86%). The best classification results were obtained from including the combination of the low-scale IA and IF magnitude with the medium-scale IA. The AM-FM features provide complementary information to classical texture analysis features like the gray-scale median, contrast, and coarseness. The findings of this study provide evidence that AM-FM features may have a potential role as surrogate markers of lesion load in MS.

IMAG1445
Dr. Marios Pattichis, Professor at the ECE Department at UNM introducing his brother, Dr. Constantinos Pattichis.

IMAG1447
Dr. Constanstinos Pattichis at the beginning of this talk on AM-FM.

Currently, Dr. Pattichis is a Professor with the Department of Computer Science of the University of Cyprus. His research interests include ehealth and mhealth, medical imaging, biosignal analysis, life sciences informatics, and intelligent systems. He has published 90 refereed journal and 200 conference papers, and 27 chapters in books in these areas. He is Co-Editor of the books M-Health: Emerging Mobile Health Systems, and of the Ultrasound and Carotid Bifurcation Atherosclerosis, published by Springer in 2006, and 2012 respectively. He was Guest Co-Editor of 14 journal Special Issues including the more recent ones on Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Health Informatics, and Citizen Centered e-Health Systems in a Global Health-care Environment, of the IEEE Trans. on Information Technology in Biomedicine. He was General Co-Chairman of the IEEE 12th International Conference on BioInformatics and BioEngineering (BIBE2012), and the IEEE Information Technology in Biomedicine (ITAB09). Moreover, he serves as Distinguished Lecturer of the IEEE EMBS, an Associate Editor of the IEEE Journal of Biomedical and Health Informatics, and on the Editorial Board of the Journal of Biomedical Signal Processing and Control. He is a Fellow of IET, and Senior Member of IEEE.

We will be announcing new EMBS-sponsored talks.

Thank you.

Gilberto (Chair)


January 17th, 2015

The Illuminating Engineering Society (IES) is the technical authority on illumination who caters to all lighting professionals. The IES, a non-profit membership organization, sets out to improve the lighted environment by bringing together those with lighting knowledge and by translating that knowledge into actions that benefit the general populace. The Illuminating Engineering Society was founded in 1906 to establish scientific lighting recommendations and to advance knowledge of the the lighted environment for the benefit and improvement of society.

The IES’s vision is to build upon a century of outstanding excellence to create a premier lighting community that’s dedicated to promoting the art and science of lighting to its members, allied profession organizations and to the public through inspiring events and through informative programs, presentations and networking events.

Announcements:

IES Albuquerque 2014-2015 Meeting Schedule
Events will be held the 1st Wednesday of the month at Chama River Brewing Company unless noted

2/4 – Jason Nabb, Echoflex Solutions – Maximizing ROI for Lighting Controls Using Wireless Technologies

3/4 – Matthew Tanteri, TANTERI + ASSOCIATES “IES Daylighting Tour” (11:30: Lunch, 12-1pm Presentation)

4/1 – Ryan Thomas, Color Kinetics/Phillips Lighting

Upcoming Events:

Announcing the 7th Annual IESABQ Golf Tournament

Friday, September 11, 2015
Paa-Ko Ridge Golf Club
9:00am Shotgun Start

For more information consult their web page.


January 17th, 2015

Science & Society Distinguished Public Talks

Presents

Miniaturization effects of solar cell: Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics
By
Jose Luis Cruz-Campa

5:30 PM Wednesday, 21 January 2015
The University of New Mexico Conference Center, Auditorium
1634 University Blvd. NE
Meet & Greet: 5 p.m.

Pizza with the speaker will follow the lecture

Jose Luis Cruz-Campa, Ph.D. an optoelectronic devices researcher at Sandia National Laboratories is the recipient of the 2014 Outstanding Young Engineer award from the Albuquerque Chapter of IEEE. He holds a doctoral degree in EE and a masters in Physics from the University of Texas at El Paso and a BS in mechanical engineering from Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana in Mexico. His research has explored scaling-effects in silicon, GaAs, and CdTe to achieve new properties and enhanced functionality in photovoltaics. Jose Luis has been highly awarded and published, and is inventor/co-inventor in 22 filed patents.

Abstract. If solar energy is ever going to become a mainstream power source, the technologies for harnessing sunlight must become cheaper than all other forms of energy, be easy and quick to install, and work more safely, reliably and durably than present-day grid power. This presentation will be an overview a new class of photovoltaics with potentially novel applications and benefits such as dramatic reductions in cost, weight, and material usage. These solar cells take advantage of scaling effects using microsystem tools to improve functionality and performance. Materials such as silicon, gallium arsenide, and CdTe have been researched.

Download the announcement:

01-Cruz-Campa-Flyer-2014


January 17th, 2015

Here is the schedule for the UNM Chapter of Sigma Xi Science and Society lecture series for spring 2015. These talks are co-sponsored by the IEEE Albuquerque Section. All IEEE members are invited.

Science & Society Distinguished Public Talks

Spring, 2015

Co-sponsored by the Albuquerque Section of the Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and its Life Members Affinity Group, Sigma Xi (the Scientific Research Society), the UNM Department of Physics & Astronomy, and the UNM Division of Continuing Education.

Free and open to the public

5:30 PM

UNM Conference Center, 1634 University Blvd NE, Albuquerque, NM *

Meet and greet with refreshments at 5 PM

Pizza with the speaker follows

Miniaturization effects of solar cell: Microsystems Enabled Photovoltaics By Jose Luis Cruz-Campa. Wednesday, 21 January 2015

The Search for Habitable Worlds By Debra Fisher, Yale University. Thursday, 19 February 2015

Stimulating Science: Caffeinated Drinks in the Prehispanic American Southwest By Patricia L. Crown, Distinguished Professor of Anthropology, University of New Mexico. Thursday, 19 March 2015

What’s a Nice Girl Like You Doing in a Place Like This? Pursuing the Jabberwock Across the Mud, the Slime, and the Rest of the Galaxy By Penny Boston, NM Tech. Thursday, 16 April 2015

Annual Sigma Xi/IEEE awards banquet Monday, 11 May 2015. Speaker TBA

More information: Contact Jackie Ericksen, jhericksen@msn.com

Facebook: UNM Chapter of Sigma Xi


January 17th, 2015

Here is the list of the IEEE Albuquerque Section for 2015:

Gilberto Zamora, Chair
Jason Neely, Vice Chair
Ray Byrne, Secretary
Aaron Murray, Treasurer

Additionally,

Jorge Piovesan, Newsletter Editor
Harjit Aluhwalia, Chair, Life Members

If you have any question or would like to participate, please leave us a comment or send us an email to: g.zamora@ieee.org

Thank you.

Gilberto (Chair)


November 8th, 2014

The New Mexico Tech Student Branch of the IEEE has updated its webpage with information on their latest activities. You can check out their page here.

If you want to contact them, please send an email to Chris, their President at: nmt.ieee@gmail.com

Congratulations to the officers and their faculty adviser, Dr. Hector Erives.

Cheers,

Gilberto (Section Chair)


November 8th, 2014

Science & Society Distinguished Public Talks

Co-sponsored by the Albuquerque Section of the Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and its Life Members Affinity Group, Sigma Xi (the Scientific Research Society), the UNM Department of Physics & Astronomy, and the UNM Division of Continuing Education.

Presents

Whose innovations are helping? Comparing climate change solutions from engineers, architects, planners, chemists, biologists, and others
By Clinton J. Andrews

Thursday, 20 November 2014

The University of New Mexico Conference Center, Auditorium
1634 University Blvd. NE

Meet & Greet: 5 p.m.
Pizza with the speaker will follow the lecture

For more details check the attached flyer:

Andrews Flyer

Cheers,

Gilberto (Chair)


October 10th, 2014

The Albuquerque IEEE Joint Chapter presents the talk: The Low-Noise Receiver Systems Developed for the EVLA.

Presented by: Bob Hayward, NRAO Senior Engineer (Retired), Socorro, NM.

Time: 7:30 pm Wednesday, October 22, 2014. Social hour begins at 5:45 pm. Dinner begins at 6:30pm.

Location: The Canyon Club (was Four Hills Country Club), 911 Four Hills Road SE, Albuquerque.

Dinner Menu: Soup of the Day, Top Sirloin, Asparagus, Garlic Mashed Potaoes, Dinner Rolls/Butter, Chef’s Choice Dessert, Coffee, Iced Tea and Water.

Cost: There is no charge and no reservation required to attend just the talk. $25 per person for dinner (full-time student members of IEEE, $15). reservations required. RSVP by email to harrisonmgabq@comcast.net or phone Mike Harrison at (505) 239-2663.

PLEASE NOTE: This dinner meeting will be held at The Canyon Club which requires a pretty accurate number of meals to prepare by noon on Monday before the Wednesday meeting. Please try to make your reservation by Monday, October 20. The Canyon Club is often flexible so it is worth trying to make a late reservation.

Presentation Summary: The Very Large Array (VLA), located less than an hour’s drive west of Socorro, NM, is widely regarded as the world’s most scientifically productive radio telescope. Operated by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO), this aperture synthesis interferometer consists of 27 movable antennas, each 25 meters in diameter, which can be configured to provide the resolution of an antenna whose size can range from 1 to 36 kilometers in width. When commissioned in 1980, the VLA could only observe celestial sources in four narrow frequency bands centered at 1.5, 4.7, 15 and 23 GHz. Over the next 20 years, its receiver systems were incrementally improved
to give the Array better sensitivity and wider frequency coverage. But as the 21st century dawned, the VLA’s performance was still limited by its 1970′s era technology.

The recently completed Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) project has provided many major enhancements, including the installation of 240 new, state-of-the-art, low-noise, cryogenic receivers that now enable astronomers to observe at any frequency between 1 and 50 GHz and with bandwidths as wide as 8 GHz, some 80 times broader than before. Over the 10 year long EVLA upgrade effort, the author was deeply involved in the design and testing of the prototype receiver hardware as well as the production of several of the new receiver bands. This talk will discuss the EVLA’s front-end systems and the innovative solutions developed by the various NRAO design teams to meet the
demanding performance goals required for the project, including such critical microwave components as the broad-band feeds, circular polarizers, low-noise amplifiers and multifunction MMIC modules. Finally, an explanation of the system tests that were used to evaluate the cryogenic receivers will be presented.

If time permits, the talk will also attempt to put the VLA into historical context by briefly discussing the early days of radio astronomy and radio interferometry, as well as describing the evolution of the VLA’s low-noise receiver system from its inception to the present day.

About the Speaker: About the Speaker: Bob Hayward has spent over 3 decades developing digital spectrometers and low-noise receiver systems for radio telescopes. He was born in Nova Scotia, Canada. He received his BSc in Physics in 1977 from Dalhousie University and
his MSc in Radio Astronomy from Queens University in 1981. He began his career in radio astronomy instrumentation in 1979 when he joined the Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics in Ottawa as a digital engineer supporting the 150-ft telescope at the Algonquin Radio Observatory (ARO). His was placed in charge of the construction, testing and system integration of the ARO Auto-Correlation Spectrometer which contained over 3,000 ECL, TTL and CMOS integrated circuits. In 1986 he was named the Project Engineer for the pair of 345 GHz receivers which HIA developed for the 15-meter James Clerk Maxwell Telescope Telescope (JCMT) in Hawaii. He left Canada in 1996 and
moved to Tucson, AZ, to become the Chief Engineer at the10-meter Sub-Millimeter Telescope Observatory (SMTO).

In 1999 he joined the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) in Socorro, NM, where he spent the next 13 years designing, building, testing and maintaining receiver systems for the Very Large Array (VLA) and the Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA). His first job was to act as the lead engineer in the development of new 80-96 GHz W-Band receivers for the VLBA. From 2004 to 2008 he managed the Front-End and Feed Systems element of the Expanded Very Large Array (EVLA) upgrade project which required the prototype design of 8 new receiver bands and the construction of a total of 240 low-noise cryogenic receivers.He was also the lead engineer on the development of the new L, K,
Ka & Q-Band EVLA receiver systems.

Bob retired from NRAO In 2012 as the Senior Engineer for Front-End Systems in Socorro. Since then he has spent his newly found free time doing historical research into some of the more obscure stories in the history of radio astronomy instrumentation. Bob became a member of the IEEE in 1980. From 1993 to 1996 he was the Secretary of the Canadian National Committee for the International Union of Radio Science (CNC /URSI).

Chapter Officers for 2014:

Chairman: Everett Farr (505) 846-0956 efarr@farr-research.com
Vice-Chair: Michael Harrison (505) 239-2663 harrisonmgabq@comcast.net
Treasurer: Paul Cravens (505) 730-3397 paul.l.cravens@usace.army.mil
Secretary: This office is currently unfilled. There are few responsibilities. It would look good on someone’s Resume’.
EMC Liaison: Bud Hoeft (505)889-9705 bud.hoeft@ieee.org
MTT-S Liaison: George Oltman (505)299-3369 g.oltman@ieee.org
NPSS Liaison: Jane Lehr (505) 277-0298 jane@ece.unm.edu


September 17th, 2014

Science & Society Distinguished Public Talks

Co-sponsored by the Albuquerque Section of the Institute of Electrical & Electronic Engineers (IEEE) and its Life Members Affinity Group, Sigma Xi (the Scientific Research Society), the Department of

Physics & Astronomy, the Maxwell Museum of Anthropology, and the Division of Continuing Education.

Presents

Colour, Music, and Emotion in Synesthetes and Non-Synesthetes

By

Stephen E. Palmer

Thursday, 18 September 2014

The University of New Mexico Conference Center, Auditorium

1634 University Blvd. NE

Meet & Greet: 5 p.m.

Pizza with the speaker will follow the lecture

Stephen E. Palmer received his B.A. in Psychology from Princeton University in 1970 and his

PhD in Psychology at UCSD in 1975. He has taught in Psychology and Cognitive Science at UC Berkeley ever since, where he also served as Director of the Institute of Cognitive Studies. He is best known for his research on perceptual organization and his interdisciplinary book, Vision Science: Photons to Phenomenology. He now studies visual aesthetics of color and spatial composition, as well as cross-modal associations between music and vision.

Abstract. Music-to-color associations were studied in synesthetes and non-synesthetes for several kinds of music, including classical, single-line piano melodies, and 34 different genres of popular music (from heavy metal to country western). When non-synesthetes chose the colors that “went best” with each selection, faster music in the major mode was strongly associated with more saturated, lighter, yellower colors. Further evidence shows that these music-to-color associations are mediated by emotion (e.g., the happy/sad ratings of the music were highly correlated with the happy/sad ratings of the colors chosen as going best with the music . Similar emotional effects were present for lower-level musical sounds. The similarities and differences of synesthetes’ and non-synesthetes’ color experiences will be discussed.IEEE and Sigma Xi present the talk: Colour, Music, and Emotion in Synesthetes and Non-Synesthetes.