5GAA, BMW Group, Ford and Groupe PSA exhibit first European demonstration of C-V2X direct communication interoperability between multiple automakers

5GAA, BMW Group, Ford and Groupe PSA announced today Europe’s first live demonstration of C-V2X direct communication technology operating across vehicles from multiple auto manufacturers. The demonstration exhibited the road safety and traffic efficiency benefits of using C-V2X for V2V collision avoidance, as well as V2I connectivity to traffic signals and Traffic Management Centers over ITS spectrum.

The 5G Automotive Association (5GAA), the BMW Group, Ford Motor Company, and Groupe PSA — in association with Qualcomm Technologies, and Savari — announced today Europe’s first live demonstration of C-V2X direct communication technology operating across vehicles from multiple auto manufacturers. The live demonstration also featured a live showcase of C-V2X direct communication technology operating between passenger cars, motorcycles, and roadside infrastructure.

The demonstration exhibited the road safety and traffic efficiency benefits of using C-V2X for Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) collision avoidance, as well as Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) connectivity to traffic signals and Traffic Management Centers (TMC). C-V2X was operated using real-time direct communications over ITS spectrum and demonstrated its ability to work without cellular network coverage, and underscores its commercial readiness for industry deployment as early as 2020. Superior performance and cost-effectiveness compared to other V2X technologies, along with forward-compatibility with 5G, make C-V2X direct communications a preferred solution for C-ITS applications.

Six demonstrations were shown including Emergency Electronic Brake Light, Intersection Collision Warning, Across Traffic Turn Collision Risk Warning, Slow Vehicle Warning and Stationary Vehicle Warning, Signal Phase and Timing / Signal Violation Warning and Vulnerable Road User (pedestrian) Warning. The vehicles involved included two-wheel e-scooters provided by BMW Group, and automotive passenger vehicles provided by Ford, Groupe PSA, and BMW Group, all of which were equipped with C-V2X direct communication technology using the Qualcomm® 9150 C-V2X chipset solution.  V2X software stack and application software, along with roadside infrastructure, were provided by industry leader, Savari.

C-V2X currently stands as the only V2X technology based on globally recognized 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) specifications, with ongoing evolution designed to offer forward compatibility with 5G.  C-V2X also leverages and reuses the upper layer protocols defined by the automotive industry, including the European Telecommunications Standards Institute (ETSI) organization. C-V2X includes two complementary transmission modes:

  • Direct communication as shown in this demonstration for V2V and V2I use cases
  • V2N network communication, which leverages mobile operators for connectivity and delivers cloud-based services, including automated crash notification (ACN, as mandated by eCall), hazard warnings, weather conditions, green light optimal speed advisory (GLOSA), parking spot location, and remote tele-operation to support automated driving, to name a few.

 

Source: http://5gaa.org/news/5gaa-bmw-group-ford-and-groupe-psa-exhibit-first-european-demonstration-of-c-v2x-direct-communication-interoperability-between-multiple-automakers/

Hyundai invests in Autotalks to develop Connectivity Technology

Hyundai Motor announced today its strategic partnership with Autotalks through a direct investment to accelerate the development and deployment of the next generation chipset for connected cars. Hyundai is expanding partnerships in the connectivity field to further strengthen connectivity technology vital to autonomous driving and explore new business opportunities within smart city infrastructure.

Hyundai Motor announced today its strategic partnership with Autotalks through a direct investment to accelerate the development and deployment of the next generation chipset for connected cars.

V2X technology allows vehicles to communicate with one another, with other road users and road infrastructure, enhancing road safety and mobility. The main focus of any V2X solution is safety. As a reliable non-line-of-sight sensor working in all environments and weather conditions, it helps prevent road collisions and avoid dangerous situations. In manned vehicles, V2X systems convey important information to the driver in the form of alerts and notifications and can also actuate the vehicle in dangerous situations. In autonomous vehicles, V2X complements existing sensors, allowing them to make more informed decisions as well as easing their interaction with other road users.

Hyundai is expanding partnerships in the connectivity field to further strengthen connectivity technology vital to autonomous driving and explore new business opportunities within smart city infrastructure.

 

Source: https://www.hyundai.news/eu/brand/hyundai-motor-company-invests-in-autotalks-to-develop-connectivity-technology-for-increased-road-safety/

HERE launches highly secure, cost-saving OTA technology for connected and self-driving vehicles

HERE Technologies announced the launch of a HERE OTA Connect for automakers to use in connected vehicles to ensure that data, software and firmware can be transferred between the cloud and a vehicle securely to update and enhance vehicle functions. OTA Connect is designed to integrate into the automaker’s backend and uses open-source technology.

HERE Technologies today announced the launch of a new over-the-air (OTA) solution for automakers to use in connected vehicles. HERE OTA Connect is aimed at solving a critical problem: ensuring that data, software and firmware can be transferred between the cloud and a vehicle securely to update and enhance vehicle functions.

OTA Connect is designed to integrate into the automaker’s backend and uses open-source technology. It can be offered to automotive customers globally and avoids lock-in to specific vendors. Currently available as a standalone product, HERE plans to combine OTA Connect with its suite of automotive software and services in the coming months, and make the technology available for non-automotive applications, which could include robotics and drones.

An OTA update is the wireless delivery and installation of new data or software to connected devices. Although OTA technology has been used for years by mobile carriers as a means to update settings and software on phones in their network, the technology’s potential for connected and self-driving cars is only now being realized. Just like phones, computers and apps, these cars have code that requires frequent updates—but the complexity of their systems and safety requirements make perfecting updates much harder. A significant amount of software, including millions of lines of code, will be required as connected and autonomous vehicles chart new journeys and encounter new scenarios on the road. Automakers also use connected cars as gathering tools; they provide rich sources of data and feed this information to the automaker’s central system to improve overall functioning.

HERE OTA Connect is a forerunner in preventing and mitigating the risks associated with unleashing new driving technology on roads and highways. The more connected and automated vehicles become, the more heightened security measures are necessary. HERE OTA Connect provides an essential link in the security chain. Its technology uses Uptane, a security framework backed by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security designed specifically for software that runs on connected and autonomous cars. Uptane is the first compromise-resilient security software solution to be discussed at the international level.

The HERE OTA Connect technology was created by Advanced Telematic Systems (ATS), a Berlin- based software company specializing in automotive products, which HERE acquired in January 2018.

Source: https://www.here.com/en/company/newsroom/press-releases/2018-23-05

Intel and Mobileye begin testing their autonomous fleet in Jerusalem

Intel and Mobileye have begun operating a 100-car autonomous vehicle (AV) fleet in Jerusalem. In the coming months, the fleet will expand to the U.S. and other regions. The fleet is powered only by cameras. In a 360-degree configuration, each vehicle uses 12 cameras, with eight cameras providing long-range surround view and four cameras utilized for parking. The radar/lidar layer will be added in the coming weeks as a second phase.

The first phase of the Intel and Mobileye 100-car autonomous vehicle (AV) fleet has begun operating in the challenging and aggressive traffic conditions of Jerusalem. The technology is being driven on the road to demonstrate the power of the Mobileye approach and technology, to prove that the Responsibility-Sensitive Safety (RSS) model increases safety, and to integrate key learnings into our products and customer projects. In the coming months, the fleet will expand to the U.S. and other regions.

During this initial phase, the fleet is powered only by cameras. In a 360-degree configuration, each vehicle uses 12 cameras, with eight cameras providing long-range surround view and four cameras utilized for parking. The goal in this phase is to prove that they can create a comprehensive end-to-end solution from processing only the camera data. They characterize an end-to-end AV solution as consisting of a surround view sensing state capable of detecting road users, drivable paths and the semantic meaning of traffic signs/lights; the real-time creation of HD-maps as well as the ability to localize the AV with centimeter-level accuracy; path planning (i.e., driving policy); and vehicle control. The sensing state is depicted in the videos above as a top-view rendering of the environment around the AV while in motion.

The camera-only phase is their strategy for achieving what they refer to as “true redundancy” of sensing. True redundancy refers to a sensing system consisting of multiple independently engineered sensing systems, each of which can support fully autonomous driving on its own. This is in contrast to fusing raw sensor data from multiple sources together early in the process, which in practice results in a single sensing system. The company claims true redundancy provides two major advantages: The amount of data required to validate the perception system is massively lower (square root of 1 billion hours vs. 1 billion hours) as depicted in the graphic below; in the case of a failure of one of the independent systems, the vehicle can continue operating safely in contrast to a vehicle with a low-level fused system that needs to cease driving immediately.

The radar/lidar layer will be added in the coming weeks as a second phase of their development and then synergies among sensing modalities can be used for increasing the “comfort” of driving.

 

Source: https://newsroom.intel.com/editorials/if-you-can-drive-jerusalem-you-can-drive-almost-anywhere/

DOCOMO achieves 5G wireless data transmission in ultra-high-mobility environment exceeding 300 km/h

NTT DOCOMO has achieved a successful 28 GHz wireless data transmission between a 5G base station and a 5G mobile station in 5G field trials using a car moving at 305 km/h. The trials also achieved 1.1 Gbps ultra-high-speed data transmission via downlink to a 5G mobile station moving at 293 km/h and a fast handover during communication between 5G base stations and a 5G mobile station moving at 290 km/h.

NTT DOCOMO announced today that together with NEC Corporation and Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) it has achieved what is believed to be the world’s first successful 28 GHz wireless data transmission between a 5G base station and a 5G mobile station in 5G field trials using a car moving at 305 km/h.

The trials also achieved what are believed to be the world’s first successful 1.1 Gbps ultra-high-speed data transmission via downlink to a 5G mobile station moving at 293 km/h and a fast handover during communication between 5G base stations and a 5G mobile station moving at 290 km/h. In addition, the trial succeeded in a wireless live relay of 4K high-frame-rate video via uplink from a 5G mobile station moving at 200 km/h.

The trials, conducted at the Japan Automobile Research Institute (JARI) on April 8, created an ultra-high-mobility test environment using a car traveling at speeds similar to those of high-speed railways.

Radio waves in the 28 GHz high-frequency band propagate very straight and make long-range transmission difficult due to large propagation loss. To overcome these challenges, the 5G base station and 5G mobile station were both equipped for beamforming, which concentrated radio power in a specific direction, and beam tracking, which switched the direction of the beams to follow the 5G mobile station as it moved at high speed. By optimizing these functions, DOCOMO succeeded in establishing wireless communications in the ultra-high-mobility test environment.

Furthermore, DOCOMO successfully confirmed 5G wireless communication across a wide area by achieving a fast handover to maintain connection with a mobile station while switching between base stations.

DOCOMO also succeeded in a wireless live transmission of 4K high-definition, 120-frames-per-second high-frame-rate video from a car moving at very high speed utilizing New window NTT’s real-time 4K high-frame-rate HEVC codec.

Other companies involved in the trials included DOCOMO 5G Open Partner Program participants, Sony Business Solutions Corporation, and DOCOMO TEAM DANDELION RACING manager Dandelion Limited.

Going forward, DOCOMO will continue conducting 5G research with world-leading vendors and partners to expand 5G capabilities in a wide range of operating environments.

 

 

Source: https://www.nttdocomo.co.jp/english/info/media_center/pr/2018/0509_00.html

Opening in October: Toyota Research Institute Automated Vehicle Test Facility

The Toyota Research Institute is constructing a closed-course test facility to develop automated vehicle technology. The new site will be used exclusively by TRI to safely replicate demanding “edge case” driving scenarios, too dangerous to perform on public roads. The facility will include congested urban environments, slick surfaces and a four-lane divided highway with high-speed entrance and exit ramps.

The Toyota Research Institute (TRI) is constructing a closed-course test facility to develop automated vehicle technology. Construction permits were filed this week to transform an approximately 60-acre site at Michigan Technical Resource Park (MITRP) in Ottawa Lake. When it becomes operational this October, the new site will be used exclusively by TRI to safely replicate demanding “edge case” driving scenarios, too dangerous to perform on public roads.

The TRI facility will be constructed inside MITRP’s 1.75-mile oval test track. It will include congested urban environments, slick surfaces and a four-lane divided highway with high-speed entrance and exit ramps.

Leasing the land from MITRP, TRI is responsible for design, construction and ultimate maintenance of the facility. TRI will also have access to the oval track and other onsite facilities and services, which are owned by MITRP and provided to all its customers. This new site expands TRI’s closed-course testing capabilities, adding to partnerships with GoMentum Station in California, and Mcity and the American Center for Mobility in Michigan.

The MITRP site has been a vehicle proving ground since 1968 when it was created by a tier-one automotive supplier. The 336-acre technology park was sold to a private developer in 2010, and it now operates as a venue available to the automotive, commercial vehicle and mobile off-highway vehicle builders and component suppliers for testing and advanced engineered technology development.

 

Source: https://newsroom.toyota.co.jp/en/corporate/22406883.html

TrueMotion partners with INRIX to deliver contextual driving data to auto insurers

TrueMotion announced a strategic partnership with INRIX to provide contextual driving data to auto insurers to improve driver safety, customer engagement, loss costs, and risk modeling. Auto insurers working with TrueMotion can now incorporate INRIX traffic, incident and road weather data into their digital programs.

TrueMotion, a platform for smartphone telematics, today announced a strategic partnership with INRIX, a provider of connected car services and transportation analytics, to provide contextual driving data to auto insurers to improve driver safety, customer engagement, loss costs, and risk modeling.

Auto insurers working with TrueMotion can now incorporate INRIX traffic, incident and road weather data into their digital programs. The addition of INRIX safety alerts enables insurers to deliver real-time driving notifications to their customers, helping them anticipate dangerous slowdowns, accidents ahead, hazardous road conditions, and other driving risks.

TrueMotion integrates this data into its patented platform and delivers it to auto insurers through an SDK for their self-serve apps or through white label apps. In addition to real-time alerts, insurance carriers can leverage this contextual road data combined with TrueMotion’s driving and distraction data to understand a driver’s true risk profile. For example, a person may drive at high speeds, but if they drive at the speed of traffic, they’re less likely to have a high rate of hard braking, a key indicator of risk. Analyzing contextual and distraction driving data together can also help carriers improve model accuracy and better forecast risk.

 

Source: http://inrix.com/press-releases/truemotion/

Toyota and Lexus to launch DSRC technology to connect vehicles and infrastructure in the U.S. in 2021

Toyota and Lexus plan to start deployment of DSRC systems on vehicles in the US in 2021. DSRC is based on industry standards, so Toyota vehicles will be able to communicate with other automakers’ equipped vehicles, multiplying the safety benefits for all.

Toyota and Lexus plan to start deployment of Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) systems on vehicles sold in the United States starting in 2021, with the goal of adoption across most of its lineup by the mid-2020s. Toyota and Lexus plans to introduce DSRC represent a significant step forward in creating a safer and more efficient driving ecosystem while advancing connected and automated technology deployment.

DSRC transmissions enable vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications – collectively known as V2X. DSRC technology, which has been comprehensively tested through government-industry collaborations and is already deployed in some areas of the U.S., supports the broadcast of precise anonymized vehicle information several times per second, including location, speed and acceleration. This information can be used by other DSRC-enabled vehicles and devices to help drivers prevent collisions.  Communication can also be enabled to provide helpful real-time information to drivers, such as potential hazards, slow or stopped vehicles ahead, or signals, signs, and road conditions that may be difficult to see.

DSRC communicates using 7 channels of the 5.9 GHz spectrum band allocated for Intelligent Transportation Systems. Importantly for consumers, because the technology does not require a cellular or data network, vehicles equipped with DSRC do not incur any cellular network carrier charges. DSRC is based on industry standards, so Toyota vehicles will be able to communicate with other automakers’ equipped vehicles, multiplying the safety benefits for all.

Looking ahead, communication-based technologies such as DSRC can help provide greater benefits to drivers as automakers increasingly equip vehicles with additional sensors, including radars and cameras. Communication technologies can be coupled with on-board sensor technology to help make automated vehicle systems for customers safer, more reliable and more enjoyable.

In Japan in 2015, Toyota and Lexus became the world’s first automaker to sell and commercialize vehicles equipped with DSRC. This technology provides drivers with useful and detailed surrounding vehicle and traffic signal information. As of March 2018, more than 100,000 DSRC-equipped Toyota and Lexus vehicles were on the road in Japan.

Over the past 13 years, Toyota has collaborated with other automakers, infrastructure organizations and the U.S. Department of Transportation to develop DSRC V2X communication technologies.  Toyota is now encouraging all automakers and transportation infrastructure owner/operators to quickly commit to DSRC technologies in the U.S. to realize the full safety and traffic flow benefits of this technology.

 

Source: http://corporatenews.pressroom.toyota.com/releases/toyota+and+lexus+to+launch+technology+connect+vehicles+infrastructure+in+u+s+2021.htm

Continental demonstrates Predictive Connectivity Manager

The intelligent mobility of the future depends on connectivity. Continental has developed a Predictive Connectivity Manager that “looks” into the future to determine network availability along the route so that it can then take appropriate action. To this aim, the connectivity manager collects data on the availability and quality of the communication channels from vehicles traveling along the same route.

Technology company Continental has developed a Predictive Connectivity Manager that “looks” into the future to determine network availability and reception quality along the route so that it can then take appropriate action. The intelligent mobility of the future depends on connectivity that is as gap-free as possible. To allow drivers to get the best out of the existing network coverage, Continental has developed a predictive data and connectivity management solution. This enables to not only identify reception white spots in advance, but also take action for a better user experience.

The project is an evolution of the Smart Telematics solution that Continental developed together with Carnegie Technologies. With Smart Telematics, it is already possible to aggregate available communication channels to get more bandwidth or to seamlessly switch between the channels once the reception quality becomes poor. The Predictive Connectivity Manager is an add-on to not only handle connectivity issues once they arise, but to develop intelligent data management and download strategies for a more anticipatory drive.

To calculate the quality of reception along the road ahead, the connectivity manager collects data on the availability and quality of the communication channels from vehicles traveling along the same route, based on their current GPS position as well as what time and day of the week it is. This data is then processed and analyzed in the backend using Continental cloud. The resulting database contains a range of data including information on signal strength, bandwidth, cellular standard and latency, as well as the cost of establishing a network connection at a specific position and the availability of different networks and providers.

In order for the vehicle’s data and channel management system to respond predictively, the connectivity manager must also be capable of predicting the route that the driver will take. To determine this “most probable path,” the software analyzes the vehicle’s pre-calculated route continuously and also accesses the navigation data.

If the connectivity manager sees that the connection along the road ahead is getting worse, or that network coverage will soon not be available, a number of possible actions may be taken. On the one hand, the software could alert the drivers of upcoming network outage and inform them when the connection will likely be available again. A digital assistant could even switch to another, data independent application instead. On the other hand, the solution could prioritize between data intensive applications according to defined guidelines. It could temporarily provide the download of a software update with less bandwidth, for example, so that the current music stream is not interrupted. In addition, predictive channel management makes it possible to switch seamlessly between the various available channels depending on network quality and cost – from mobile networks, available WLAN hotspots in big cities or even satellite connection. In other words, if one channel offers better reception quality than another, the connectivity manager can switch between the networks.

The Predictive Connectivity Manager can either run discreetly in the background and make its own decisions or actively involve the driver so that they can decide which of the available options to use.

 

Source: https://www.continental-corporation.com/en/press/press-releases/2018-02-26-predictive-connectivity-122554

Driverless testing and public use rules for autonomous vehicles approved in California

The California Department of Motor Vehicles announced today the approval of regulations governing the driverless testing and public use of autonomous vehicles on California roads, which establishes rules for testing autonomous technology without a driver.

The California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) announced today that the Office of Administrative Law approved regulations governing the driverless testing and public use of autonomous vehicles on California roads. Prior to these rules, autonomous vehicles could only be tested in California with an approved driver.

This second set of regulations for autonomous vehicles in California establishes rules for testing autonomous technology without a driver and how manufacturers can allow the public to use self-driving cars. The regulations become effective on April 2, 2018, and DMV can begin issuing permits on that date.

The DMV is required to adopt regulations that cover both the testing and deployment of autonomous vehicles. Testing regulations that require a driver behind the steering wheel took effect in September 2014. To date, 50 manufacturers have a permit to test autonomous vehicles with a driver. Manufacturers can continue to apply for a test permit with a driver.

Under the new regulations, vehicle manufacturers must obtain a driverless testing and/or a deployment permit from the DMV and comply with the permit requirements, if they wish to either test an autonomous vehicle without a driver or allow the public to use their autonomous technology.

Requirements for Driverless Testing include:

  • Certify that local authorities, where vehicles will be tested, have been provided written notification.
  • Certify the autonomous test vehicle complies with requirements that include a communication link between the vehicle and remote operator, a process to communicate between the vehicle and law enforcement, and an explanation of how the manufacturer will monitor test vehicles.
  • Submit a copy of a law enforcement interaction plan.
  • Certify the autonomous test vehicle meets all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) or provide evidence of an exemption from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).
  • Certify the autonomous test vehicle is capable of operating without the presence of a driver and meets the autonomous technology description of a Level 4 or Level 5 under the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) definitions.
  • Inform the DMV of the intended operational design domains.
  • Maintain a training program for remote operations and certify each operator has completed training.
  • Submit an annual disengagement report and submit collision reports to the DMV within 10 days.

Requirements for Deployment (Public Use) include:

  • Certify the vehicle is equipped with an autonomous vehicle data recorder, the technology is designed to detect and respond to roadway situations in compliance with California Vehicle Code, and the vehicle complies with all FMVSS or provide evidence of an exemption from NHTSA.
  • Certify the vehicle meets current industry standards to help defend against, detect and respond to cyber-attacks, unauthorized intrusions or false vehicle control commands.
  • Certify the manufacturer has conducted test and validation methods and is satisfied the vehicle is safe for deployment on public roads.
  • Submit a copy of a law enforcement interaction plan.
  • If the vehicle does not require a driver, the manufacturer must also certify to other requirements, including a communication link between the vehicle and a remote operator and the ability to display or transfer vehicle owner or operator information in the event of a collision.

The adopted regulations do not include testing and deployment of autonomous trucks and other commercial vehicles. DMV will be collaborating with the California Highway Patrol to begin exploring the unique safety and regulatory considerations associated with these vehicles.

View the regulations for a complete list of requirements. The regulations are available on the autonomous vehicle webpage on the DMV website.

 

Source: https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/newsrel/2018/2018_17