Toyota and Lexus to launch DSRC technology to connect vehicles and infrastructure in the U.S. in 2021

Toyota and Lexus plan to start deployment of DSRC systems on vehicles in the US in 2021. DSRC is based on industry standards, so Toyota vehicles will be able to communicate with other automakers’ equipped vehicles, multiplying the safety benefits for all.

Toyota and Lexus plan to start deployment of Dedicated Short-Range Communications (DSRC) systems on vehicles sold in the United States starting in 2021, with the goal of adoption across most of its lineup by the mid-2020s. Toyota and Lexus plans to introduce DSRC represent a significant step forward in creating a safer and more efficient driving ecosystem while advancing connected and automated technology deployment.

DSRC transmissions enable vehicle-to-vehicle (V2V) and vehicle-to-infrastructure (V2I) communications – collectively known as V2X. DSRC technology, which has been comprehensively tested through government-industry collaborations and is already deployed in some areas of the U.S., supports the broadcast of precise anonymized vehicle information several times per second, including location, speed and acceleration. This information can be used by other DSRC-enabled vehicles and devices to help drivers prevent collisions.  Communication can also be enabled to provide helpful real-time information to drivers, such as potential hazards, slow or stopped vehicles ahead, or signals, signs, and road conditions that may be difficult to see.

DSRC communicates using 7 channels of the 5.9 GHz spectrum band allocated for Intelligent Transportation Systems. Importantly for consumers, because the technology does not require a cellular or data network, vehicles equipped with DSRC do not incur any cellular network carrier charges. DSRC is based on industry standards, so Toyota vehicles will be able to communicate with other automakers’ equipped vehicles, multiplying the safety benefits for all.

Looking ahead, communication-based technologies such as DSRC can help provide greater benefits to drivers as automakers increasingly equip vehicles with additional sensors, including radars and cameras. Communication technologies can be coupled with on-board sensor technology to help make automated vehicle systems for customers safer, more reliable and more enjoyable.

In Japan in 2015, Toyota and Lexus became the world’s first automaker to sell and commercialize vehicles equipped with DSRC. This technology provides drivers with useful and detailed surrounding vehicle and traffic signal information. As of March 2018, more than 100,000 DSRC-equipped Toyota and Lexus vehicles were on the road in Japan.

Over the past 13 years, Toyota has collaborated with other automakers, infrastructure organizations and the U.S. Department of Transportation to develop DSRC V2X communication technologies.  Toyota is now encouraging all automakers and transportation infrastructure owner/operators to quickly commit to DSRC technologies in the U.S. to realize the full safety and traffic flow benefits of this technology.

 

Source: http://corporatenews.pressroom.toyota.com/releases/toyota+and+lexus+to+launch+technology+connect+vehicles+infrastructure+in+u+s+2021.htm

Continental demonstrates Predictive Connectivity Manager

The intelligent mobility of the future depends on connectivity. Continental has developed a Predictive Connectivity Manager that “looks” into the future to determine network availability along the route so that it can then take appropriate action. To this aim, the connectivity manager collects data on the availability and quality of the communication channels from vehicles traveling along the same route.

Technology company Continental has developed a Predictive Connectivity Manager that “looks” into the future to determine network availability and reception quality along the route so that it can then take appropriate action. The intelligent mobility of the future depends on connectivity that is as gap-free as possible. To allow drivers to get the best out of the existing network coverage, Continental has developed a predictive data and connectivity management solution. This enables to not only identify reception white spots in advance, but also take action for a better user experience.

The project is an evolution of the Smart Telematics solution that Continental developed together with Carnegie Technologies. With Smart Telematics, it is already possible to aggregate available communication channels to get more bandwidth or to seamlessly switch between the channels once the reception quality becomes poor. The Predictive Connectivity Manager is an add-on to not only handle connectivity issues once they arise, but to develop intelligent data management and download strategies for a more anticipatory drive.

To calculate the quality of reception along the road ahead, the connectivity manager collects data on the availability and quality of the communication channels from vehicles traveling along the same route, based on their current GPS position as well as what time and day of the week it is. This data is then processed and analyzed in the backend using Continental cloud. The resulting database contains a range of data including information on signal strength, bandwidth, cellular standard and latency, as well as the cost of establishing a network connection at a specific position and the availability of different networks and providers.

In order for the vehicle’s data and channel management system to respond predictively, the connectivity manager must also be capable of predicting the route that the driver will take. To determine this “most probable path,” the software analyzes the vehicle’s pre-calculated route continuously and also accesses the navigation data.

If the connectivity manager sees that the connection along the road ahead is getting worse, or that network coverage will soon not be available, a number of possible actions may be taken. On the one hand, the software could alert the drivers of upcoming network outage and inform them when the connection will likely be available again. A digital assistant could even switch to another, data independent application instead. On the other hand, the solution could prioritize between data intensive applications according to defined guidelines. It could temporarily provide the download of a software update with less bandwidth, for example, so that the current music stream is not interrupted. In addition, predictive channel management makes it possible to switch seamlessly between the various available channels depending on network quality and cost – from mobile networks, available WLAN hotspots in big cities or even satellite connection. In other words, if one channel offers better reception quality than another, the connectivity manager can switch between the networks.

The Predictive Connectivity Manager can either run discreetly in the background and make its own decisions or actively involve the driver so that they can decide which of the available options to use.

 

Source: https://www.continental-corporation.com/en/press/press-releases/2018-02-26-predictive-connectivity-122554

Driverless testing and public use rules for autonomous vehicles approved in California

The California Department of Motor Vehicles announced today the approval of regulations governing the driverless testing and public use of autonomous vehicles on California roads, which establishes rules for testing autonomous technology without a driver.

The California Department of Motor Vehicles (DMV) announced today that the Office of Administrative Law approved regulations governing the driverless testing and public use of autonomous vehicles on California roads. Prior to these rules, autonomous vehicles could only be tested in California with an approved driver.

This second set of regulations for autonomous vehicles in California establishes rules for testing autonomous technology without a driver and how manufacturers can allow the public to use self-driving cars. The regulations become effective on April 2, 2018, and DMV can begin issuing permits on that date.

The DMV is required to adopt regulations that cover both the testing and deployment of autonomous vehicles. Testing regulations that require a driver behind the steering wheel took effect in September 2014. To date, 50 manufacturers have a permit to test autonomous vehicles with a driver. Manufacturers can continue to apply for a test permit with a driver.

Under the new regulations, vehicle manufacturers must obtain a driverless testing and/or a deployment permit from the DMV and comply with the permit requirements, if they wish to either test an autonomous vehicle without a driver or allow the public to use their autonomous technology.

Requirements for Driverless Testing include:

  • Certify that local authorities, where vehicles will be tested, have been provided written notification.
  • Certify the autonomous test vehicle complies with requirements that include a communication link between the vehicle and remote operator, a process to communicate between the vehicle and law enforcement, and an explanation of how the manufacturer will monitor test vehicles.
  • Submit a copy of a law enforcement interaction plan.
  • Certify the autonomous test vehicle meets all Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) or provide evidence of an exemption from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA).
  • Certify the autonomous test vehicle is capable of operating without the presence of a driver and meets the autonomous technology description of a Level 4 or Level 5 under the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) definitions.
  • Inform the DMV of the intended operational design domains.
  • Maintain a training program for remote operations and certify each operator has completed training.
  • Submit an annual disengagement report and submit collision reports to the DMV within 10 days.

Requirements for Deployment (Public Use) include:

  • Certify the vehicle is equipped with an autonomous vehicle data recorder, the technology is designed to detect and respond to roadway situations in compliance with California Vehicle Code, and the vehicle complies with all FMVSS or provide evidence of an exemption from NHTSA.
  • Certify the vehicle meets current industry standards to help defend against, detect and respond to cyber-attacks, unauthorized intrusions or false vehicle control commands.
  • Certify the manufacturer has conducted test and validation methods and is satisfied the vehicle is safe for deployment on public roads.
  • Submit a copy of a law enforcement interaction plan.
  • If the vehicle does not require a driver, the manufacturer must also certify to other requirements, including a communication link between the vehicle and a remote operator and the ability to display or transfer vehicle owner or operator information in the event of a collision.

The adopted regulations do not include testing and deployment of autonomous trucks and other commercial vehicles. DMV will be collaborating with the California Highway Patrol to begin exploring the unique safety and regulatory considerations associated with these vehicles.

View the regulations for a complete list of requirements. The regulations are available on the autonomous vehicle webpage on the DMV website.

 

Source: https://www.dmv.ca.gov/portal/dmv/detail/pubs/newsrel/2018/2018_17

Volkswagen Group will roll-out IEEE 802.11p standard in volume models from 2019

From 2019 onwards, the brands of the Volkswagen Group are to use the IEEE 802.11p standard for communications among vehicles and between vehicles and their environment. The introduction of this technology as standard equipment on volume models ranging from compact cars to commercial vehicles is expected to significantly improve safety on the roads of Europe.

From 2019 onwards, the brands of the Volkswagen Group are to use the IEEE 802.11p standard, which has already been comprehensively tested, for communications among vehicles and between vehicles and their environment. The introduction of this technology as standard equipment on volume models ranging from compact cars to commercial vehicles is expected to significantly improve safety on the roads of Europe.

Networking among vehicles and between vehicles and their environment, irrespective of manufacturer, will be a key step in reducing road accidents. Within a few milliseconds, traffic-relevant information on the local environment about 500 m around the vehicle will be transmitted both among vehicles and between vehicles and traffic infrastructure.

The principle of platooning, with networked trucks driving in synchronized convoys, is also based on this technology. In addition to improving road safety and traffic flow, the new technology will also reduce fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emissions.

The area-wide introduction of standardized IEEE 802.11p, which has already been comprehensively tested, will also provide a reliable system for operators of traffic infrastructure (such as traffic lights), and fleets (emergency service and construction site vehicles). This way, information on traffic flow, accidents, roadworks and other relevant situations and events can be reliably made available in the local area.

 

Source: https://www.volkswagenag.com/en/news/2018/02/volkswagen_group_rapid_road_safety.html

GM Cruise AV: the First Production-Ready Car With No Steering Wheel or Pedals

General Motors is seeking U.S. government approval for a fully autonomous car – one without a steering wheel, brake pedal or accelerator pedal – to enter the automaker’s first commercial ride-sharing fleet in 2019.

General Motors filed a Safety Petition with the Department of Transportation for its fourth-generation self-driving Cruise AV, the first production-ready vehicle built from the start to operate safely on its own, with no driver, steering wheel, pedals or manual controls.

For more information on how GM engineered safety into the Cruise AV in every step of design, development, manufacturing, testing and validation, view their 2018 Self-Driving Safety Report.

 

Source: https://media.gm.com/media/us/en/gm/news.detail.html/content/Pages/news/us/en/2018/jan/0112-cruise-av.html

Leading Automotive, Telecom and ITS Companies Unveil First Announced Cellular V2X Trials in Japan

Continental, Ericsson, Nissan, NTT DOCOMO, OKI and Qualcomm Technologies join forces to host C-V2X trials in Japan in 2018 to validate and demonstrate the benefits of Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything (C-V2X). The use cases are designed to focus on Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V), Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle-to-Pedestrian (V2P) direct communications, as well as Vehicle-to-Network (V2N) operations over cellular network-based wide area communications with cloud access.

Continental, Ericsson, Nissan, NTT DOCOMO, OKI and Qualcomm Technologies announced today plans to carry out their first Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything (C-V2X) trials in Japan. The objective is to validate and demonstrate the benefits of C-V2X using direct communication technology defined by the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) in their Release 14 specifications. The trials are designed to show the enhanced range reliability and latency benefits of C-V2X direct communications operated in 5 GHz band. Additionally, the C-V2X trials are designed to demonstrate the complementary benefits of network-based communications utilizing LTE-Advanced (LTE-A). The trial results will help develop the ecosystem by providing inputs to the relevant stakeholders, including ITS-related organizations and government agencies, as we prepare for the connected car of the future and the industry’s evolutionary transition towards 5G New Radio (NR), the new global cellular standard being defined in 3GPP.

Preparation work is well underway with the trial expected to begin in 2018 and the use cases are designed to focus on Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V), Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) and Vehicle-to-Pedestrian (V2P) direct communications, as well as Vehicle-to-Network (V2N) operations over cellular network-based wide area communications with cloud access.

For the field trials, Continental will utilize the Qualcomm® C-V2X Reference Design, which features the Qualcomm® 9150 C-V2X chipset with integrated Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) capability to build connected car systems and integrate the systems into Nissan vehicles. Nissan will perform V2X use case selection and develop test scenarios with key performance indicators (KPIs) for C-V2X technology validation. OKI, one of the leading companies in ITS, will bring their expertise in roadside unit (RSU) infrastructure and applications to demonstrate V2I as a viable technology for advanced traffic applications by integrating the Qualcomm® 9150 C-V2X chipset into their RSU. Ericsson, as one of the leading companies in the technology and service for telecommunication, will join to the V2N use case discussion, considering a combination of direct communication and LTE-A network technologies. NTT DOCOMO will provide an LTE-A network and V2N applications to demonstrate the benefits of complementary use of network-based communications for a variety of advanced automotive informational safety use cases.

 

Source: https://www.qualcomm.com/news/releases/2018/01/11/leading-automotive-telecom-and-its-companies-unveil-first-announced

Qualcomm and Ford Collaborate on C-V2X Global Initiative

Qualcomm Technologies and Ford Motor Company are accelerating the development of connected cars with the extension of their long-standing relationship into the development of advanced connectivity systems for Ford vehicles and upcoming Cellular Vehicle-to-Everything (C-V2X) technology testing. Qualcomm Technologies’ C-V2X commercial solution, the Qualcomm® 9150 C-V2X chipset, is expected to be commercially available the second half of 2018. Depending on the results of those field validations, and a change to the current regulatory environment, this technology may be featured in vehicles in the near-future. Ford and Qualcomm Technologies are currently working together on the first announced U.S. C-V2X trials in San Diego, along with additional trials in Detroit, with both trials utilizing the 9150 C-V2X solution.

Using direct communication mode, C-V2X is designed to allow vehicles to directly communicate with other vehicles, pedestrian devices, and roadside infrastructure, such as traffic signs and construction zones, without the involvement of a cellular network, or cellular network subscription. Importantly, these capabilities supported by some of the latest advancements in wireless technology based on today’s standards, such as 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) Release 14 specifications and ITS standards, while also providing a strong path towards 5G.

Wireless communication is expected to play important role as autonomous vehicles are expected to be ubiquitous on city streets today and in the future. By facilitating communication between vehicles and a variety of other Smart City constituents, C-V2X technology complements Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) sensors to help build a comprehensive picture of the world in which vehicles must navigate. C-V2X is designed to allow vehicles to provide information about the vehicle’s surroundings and identify objects that may be out of view, including accidents that are further down the road, or pedestrians that are obstructed by large trucks or buildings.

As a part of the ongoing relationship, the companies are working on automotive telematics platforms with integrated Qualcomm® Snapdragon™ LTE modems to provide the fast, reliable and efficient connectivity needed for telematics applications, connected navigation and infotainment systems. As the automotive industry prepares for advancements towards 5G, Ford and Qualcomm Technologies plan to work on next-generation telematics concepts and solutions featuring C-V2X technology.

 

Source: https://www.qualcomm.com/news/releases/2018/01/09/qualcomm-and-ford-collaborate-c-v2x-global-initiative-improve-vehicle

Dallas picks Ericsson for Smart Cities Traffic Solution

The City of Dallas has selected Ericsson to install and host an Advanced Traffic Management System based on Ericsson’s Connected Urban Transport solution. This solution will give the City of Dallas and adjacent cities the ability to aggregate and analyze diverse, real-time data from traffic sensors and cameras to dynamically control traffic lights, school flashers and message signs.

The City of Dallas has selected Ericsson to install and host an Advanced Traffic Management System (ATMS) based on Ericsson’s Connected Urban Transport solution. The city’s vision for the traffic system is an intuitive and easy-to-use interface that automates and facilitates system monitoring, management, maintenance, and performance monitoring across departments, as well as between cities and counties.

The Connected Urban Transport solution will give the City of Dallas and adjacent cities the ability to aggregate and analyze diverse, real-time data from traffic sensors and cameras to dynamically control traffic lights, school flashers and message signs. The solution will allow the City of Dallas to expand its knowledge about traffic issues and assist with operational decision-making to improve traffic flow.

The main features of the system include:

  • An ecosystem to share data and system services with other organizations in a controlled way – to increase collaboration and empowerment of other departments, travelers and transport service providers
  • A dashboard to have one central overview, across agencies, of the status of all systems – for quick troubleshooting
  • Key performance indicators (KPI’s), to monitor and track the city’s goals and suppliers’ performance – for performance and contract management
  • Automation, where one system can trigger or notify another system when thresholds are violated – for faster responses and reduced workload

Implementation began at the end of 2017 and the system will be fully operational by 2020.

 

Source: https://www.ericsson.com/ci/en/press-releases/2018/1/dallas-picks-ericsson-for-smart-cities-traffic-solution

Uber Selects NVIDIA Technology to Power Its Self-Driving Fleets

NVIDIA and Uber agree to incorporate NVIDIA technology for the AI computing system in Uber’ fleet of self-driving vehicles. NVIDIA technology will be used for running AI algorithms that enable vehicles to perceive the world, predict what will happen next and quickly choose the best course of action.

NVIDIA and Uber today announced that the ridesharing company has selected NVIDIA technology for the AI computing system in its fleet of self-driving vehicles. The collaboration utilizes NVIDIA technology for Uber Advanced Technologies Group’s fleets of self-driving cars and freight trucks, running AI algorithms that enable vehicles to perceive the world, predict what will happen next and quickly choose the best course of action, even in complex environments.

Uber began working on self-driving technology in early 2015, and launched the first city trials in Pittsburgh, in fall 2016, followed by a second pilot in Phoenix, starting in early 2017. Over this period, self-driving Ubers have completed more than 50,000 passenger trips and have logged over 2 million autonomous miles.

Uber’s use of NVIDIA’s technology reflects the reality that the computational requirements of self-driving vehicles are enormous. Self-driving cars and trucks must perceive the world through high-resolution, 360-degree surround cameras and lidars; localize the vehicle within centimeter accuracy; detect and track other vehicles and people; and plan a safe, comfortable path to the destination. All this processing must be done with multiple levels of redundancy to ensure the highest level of safety. The computing demands of driverless vehicles are easily 50 to 100 times more intensive than the most advanced cars today.

Uber began using NVIDIA GPU computing technology in its first test fleet of Volvo XC90 SUVs, and currently uses high-performance NVIDIA processors to run deep neural networks in both its self-driving ride-hailing cars and self-driving freight trucks. The development pace of the Uber fleet has accelerated dramatically, with the last million autonomous miles being driven in just 100 days.

 

Source: https://nvidianews.nvidia.com/news/uber-selects-nvidia-technology-to-power-its-self-driving-fleets

LG Electronics and HERE Technologies partner on autonomous cars

LG Electronics is partnering with HERE Technologies to offer a next-generation telematics solution for autonomous vehicles combining LG’s advanced telematics technology with high-precision map data and location services. Through their planned collaboration, the companies aim to support automakers globally with a robust and secure data communications hub for highly automated and fully autonomous cars.

LG Electronics is partnering with HERE Technologies, a global provider of digital mapping and location services, to offer a next-generation telematics solution for autonomous vehicles. The solution combines LG’s advanced telematics technology with high-precision map data and location services powered by the HERE Open Location Platform. Through their planned collaboration, the companies aim to support automakers globally with a robust and secure data communications hub for highly automated and fully autonomous cars.

Telematics is an industry that is defined as the integration of telecommunications and informatics to provide vehicle safety and entertainment services such as navigation, location confirmation and emergency dispatch through various communication technologies, from GPS and DMB (Digital Multimedia Broadcasting) networks to Bluetooth, Wi-Fi and mobile communication. LG is committed to introducing next-generation solutions that offer high-precision map information to meet the needs of the quickly expanding autonomous vehicle industry.

HERE is powering more than 100 million cars on the road today. The company is working with automakers on the development of HD Live Map, its highly-accurate cloud-based map service which supports connected ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) and automated driving solutions. HD Live Map, which LG intends to deploy in the joint solution it offers automakers, identifies all roads and surrounding features such as lane markings, stop signs, crosswalks, speed signs and traffic lights. The importance of the company’s intellectual property and potential was highlighted in 2015 when a consortium of global automotive companies – Audi, BMW and Daimler – acquired HERE. The company has since also welcomed additional investors from the broader technology industry.

When fully developed, telematics will play a key role as the communication hub for autonomous vehicles. First, sensors in the vehicle’s ADAS – comprised of cameras, radar and lidar – read the surrounding environment and send the data to the cloud along with information on nearby vehicles collected via V2X (Vehicle-to-Everything). All the information gathered is repeatedly analyzed and transmitted to the telematics systems of vehicles for customized driving information.

 

Source: https://www.here.com/en/company/newsroom/press-releases/2017-27-12