IEEE Dayton Section

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  • IEEE Dayton Section

September 1st, 2014

IEEE - Dayton Section Computer Society Meeting

 Internet of Things:  An Application Centric Perspective

See the Full Announcement for complete details.

TOPIC: Internet
SPEAKER: Dr. Amit Sheth:  Founder & Executive Director, Ohio Center of Excellence in Knowledge-enabled Computing (Kno.e.sis) Lexis Nexis Ohio Eminent Scholar, Wright State University
DATE: Tuesday, September 16, 2014
TIME: 11:30-12:30 PM
PLACE: Kno.e.sis 399 Joshi Research Center, Wright State University Main Campus (park in visitor parking – Lot 2,off University Boulevard.  Joshi Center is just to the right of the Student Union. There may be a nominal parking fee)
BONUS: After the presentation, a brief tour of Kno.e.sis – the Ohio Center of Excellence in Knowledge-enabled Computing will be provided.  Brochure: http://knoesis.org/resources/images/iPad2.pdfWeb site: http://knoesis.org
RSVP: DaytonComputerSociety@gmail.com or Dave Perez (937)904-5486.  Pizza and water provided for recommended donation of $3/person – RSVP (name, email, phone, IEEE member? Computer Society member? pizza?) required.  Meeting open to all.

May 15th, 2014

The May 2014 Newsletter, the Mini Conductor, is now available on-line.


May 1st, 2014

Dr. Anirban Bandyopadhyay

National Institute of Material Science, Tsukuba City, Japan

“Computing with organic brain jelly: creating loops of rhythms to avoid software programming”

Abstract: The potential of pattern-based computing was never explored to the fullest. Scientists have always tried to look for the computing constructs that would lead to logical operation. We created the smallest molecular neural network, a nano-molecular wheel , with glia-inspired circuiting, and then a cellular automaton- based mas-sively parallel computing on the organic molecular layer. We realized that neither computing construct helps us to generate bio-inspired computing, nor the analogue pattern formation similar to a particular physical phenome-non. We then started building “brain jelly,” which is an organic molecular machine that replicates a particular electromagnetic rhythm of oscillations throughout its structure. This is exactly what our brain does: it encodes a particular resonant vibration loop in terms of its neural circuitry. We observe that the brain jelly encodes multiple rhythms in a simple set of materials. We use this particular structural behavior to encode and retrieve complex sets of arguments within a finite time, which cannot otherwise be solved by computer within a time less than the age of this universe, even using the most powerful exascale (10^18 bits per second) supercomputer. When we follow this particular approach, the Turing tape appears like a fractal network, a never ending process, which means such a reconfigurable hardware cannot be classified as a Turing machine. The entire machine has only one tape and the solution is sent by a “spontaneous reply back”, hence we can perform searching without a search in this hardware.