IEEE

Lesson Plans

During IEEE E-Scientia students will undergo training based on electrical and electronic principles and learn how to assemble some basic circuits.

TryEngineering.org offers several lesson plans to help you provide students with some background information in this area. The IEEE E-Scientia educators’s guide (PDF, 466 KB) also provides background information about the content and concepts featured in the exhibit.

Lesson Plans

Electric Switches
Demonstrate how electric circuits can be controlled with a simple switch. Note: This lesson plan is designed for classroom use only, with supervision by a teacher familiar with electrical and electronic concepts.

Electric Messages: Then and Now
Lesson focuses on exploring electric message systems, from light signals using International Morse Code to text messaging. Students construct a simple telegraph using a battery, wires, a switch, and bulb, and explore the impact of communications on society.

Flashlights and Batteries
Lesson focuses on the concept of electron flow through the demonstration of electrical circuits in a flashlight, and how batteries operate.

Here Comes the Sun
Lesson focuses on solar panel design, and its application in the standard calculator. It explores how both solar panels and calculators operate and explores simple circuits using solar power.

Insulators and Conductors
Demonstrating the concept of conducting or insulating electricity. Note: This lesson plan is designed for classroom use only, with supervision by a teacher familiar with electrical and electronic concepts.

Get Connected With Ohm’s Law
Demonstrate Ohm’s Law using digital multi-meters. Fun hands-on activities are presented that demonstrate Ohm’s Law. Teachers use digital multi-meters to collect data that are plotted to show that voltage and current are related by linear functions for ordinary resistors and by power functions for light bulbs.

Series and Parallel Circuits
Demonstrate and discuss simple circuits and the differences between parallel and serial circuit design and functions. Note: This lesson plan is designed for classroom use only, with supervision by a teacher familiar with electrical and electronic concepts.

Two Button Buzzer Circuit
Demonstrate how two switches interact in an electrical circuit such as that used to sound a buzzer. Note: This lesson plan is designed for classroom use only, with supervision by a teacher familiar with electrical and electronic concepts.

Using Ohm’s Law to Build a Voltage Divider
Students will design, build, and characterize one of the basic circuits of electrical engineering, the voltage divider. These circuits produce a wide range of output voltages and are building blocks for more complex circuits. Circuit design will emphasize the concepts of Ohm’s Law and students will explore mathematical relationships of parallel and series resistors. Students will demonstrate their design efforts by building prototype circuits and using test measurement tools to confirm their predictions.

Arduino Blink Challenge
Lesson explores computer programming and the impact of computers on society. Students build and test a program to turn a light on and off using an Arduino board. They connect the hardware, program the code, test their system, adapt it for variations in blinking times, evaluate their results, and share observations with their class.

The Power of Graphene
Lesson focuses on graphene and its electrical properties and applications. Students learn about nanotechnology and how engineers can harness the differences in how materials behave when small to address challenges in many industries. Students work in teams to hypothesize and then test whether graphene is an electrical conductor or insulator. They build a simple circuit using everyday items, and create a graphene sample using soft pencils on paper. They observe what they see, extrapolate to broader applications, present their ideas to the class, and reflect on the experience.

Radio Reception and Transmission
Lesson explores the electronics behind radio, and its impact on society. Students work in teams to build and test a radio receiver and optional transmitter from either a snap or soldering kit (depending on level and age). They review challenges encountered in the building and testing process, evaluate their results, and share observations with their class.