Innovative Smart Grid Technologies
IEEE

ISGT2014 Tutorials

 Morning Track          |         Afternoon Track

 

Morning Track  (February 22, 2013  8:00 am – 12:00 pm)
 Session I

Saturday 8:00am – 12:00pm (Lafayette Park)
Electric Vehicle Charging Integration in Distribution Grids

Instructors: Johan Driesen, Niels Leemput, Jeroen Buscher, KU Leuven

This tutorial starts with an overview of the main charging principles that are in use for powering up battery electric vehicles and plug-in electric vehicles. After a short introduction on e-mobility, the main standardized systems (AC, DC, different modes) and advanced principles such as wireless charging are discussed, referring to practical cases where vehicles have to be charged in different environments and different use cases or business models. The link with power system integration is made by addressing the impact of this new type of power consumption on the power flow and stability. “Smart” solutions are proposed, such as droop control and demand side management implementation. Modeling techniques and hardware implementations are briefly discussed. Examples from on-going research and living –lab trials are given. This tutorial intends to make a bridge between developments in smart grids, e-mobility and intelligent hard- and software solutions enabling the deployment of electric vehicles.

johan_driesenJohan Driesen received his M.Sc. degree in 1996 as Electrotechnical Engineer from the K.U. Leuven, Belgium. He received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering at K.U Leuven in 2000.  Currently he is a professor at the K.U.Leuven and teaches power electronics, renewables and drives. In 2000-2001 he was a visiting researcher in the Imperial College of Science, Technology, and Medicine, London, UK. In 2002 he worked at the University of California, Berkeley, USA. Currently he conducts research on distributed energy resources, including renewable energy systems, power electronics and its applications, for instance in renewable energy and electric vehicles.
 Session II Saturday 8:00am – 12:00pm (Farragut Square)
Introduction to Smart Grid Data and Analytics

Instructor: Doug Houseman, EnerNex

This is an introductory level course to look at smart grid data and analytics, the focus is on the distribution and customer domains of the NIST model. The course covers the following key topics:

  1. What data is available from which devices, from the in home controller to meters to relays and substation automation.
  2. What applications can be done with the data, with a heavy focus on AMI and line devices.
  3. What is the value of each of the applications to the various stakeholders that are associated with the grid, using the Illinois Collaborative definitions of stakeholders.

The course will look at the process of collecting and verifying data, including all of the pitfalls that may occur and provide a 20 step process to go from no data to running analytics. The course is suitable for non-technical, as well as technical audiences, including regulatory, legislative, and utility staff members. The course will also compare and contrast the two major privacy contenders and the impact each would have on the ability to perform the analytic applications based on the principles of each contender. Included in the course will be a summary of the ARRA analytics that have been highlighted by the EPRI and DOE reports.

doug_housemanDoug Houseman is VP of Technology and Innovations at EnerNex. Doug has worked on smart grid projects around the world. He developed many IEEE PES Smart Grid Tutorials and is working on the IEEE 2050 Grid Vision Project. He is a member of the NIST/EPRI smart grid framework architecture team and helped develop the NIST smart grid framework model. Doug was lead investigator on one of the largest studies on the future of distribution companies over the last 5 years working with more than 100 utilities and 20 governments. Doug has facilitated over 40 single utility smart grid road map sessions in 14 countries.
 Session III

Saturday 8:00am – 12:00pm (McPherson Square)
(Part I, continued in afternoon)

Implementation of Synchrophasor Systems

Instructor: Vahid Madani, Pacific Gas and Electric Company
(Click here for detailed course abstract and outline)

The electric power industry has experienced significant investment in the deployment of phasor measurement units (PMUs) and the associated infrastructure for making synchrophasor measurements and data collection. From a system reliability standpoint, real-time measurements allow early identification of potential problems both locally and regionally. The distinction of PMU technology comes from its unique ability to provide synchronized power system phasor measurements from widely dispersed locations in an electric power grid. From a broader perspective, the synchrophasor technology offers means to solve a series of challenges, thus attracting the industry worldwide.

This tutorial is intended for the power system practitioners considering investment in synchrophasor technology and the associated business case considerations. In addition to the benefits enabled by technology, the topics covered include understanding phasors, synchronization mechanisms including standards for distributing accurate timing information, the computation processing and accuracy of measurement, performance requirements for phasor data concentrators (PDCs), PDC function descriptions and functional requirements, data aggregation and alignment, configuration set points, and balancing data latency and integrity. Relevant industry standards and guides, phasor data communication and archival, approaches and architectures to build wide-area measurement systems, and applications using synchrophasor data such as situational awareness, advanced warning systems, adaptive protection, state estimation, and voltage stability monitoring will be presented. The tutorial will also include a review of the IEEE guides for installation and testing of PMUs and PDCs, and the need for conformance to the standards and calibration of the entire measurement chain.

 

vahid_madaniDr. Vahid Madani, Ph.D., P.E, Fellow IEEE – is a technology leader for advanced power systems applications at Pacific Gas and Electric, headquartered in San Francisco, California.  His most recent assignments are associated with grid modernization, reactive compensation, Integration of Protection & Automation for T&D, wide-area advanced warning systems in disaster recovery environment, and deployment of emerging technology and Synchrophasor deployment. Dr. Madani is the Chair of the Performance Standards at NASPI (North American Synchrophasor Initiative), Chair of the IEEE PES Fellows Committee, and Chair of Power System Relaying Committee (PSRC) Working Groups.   He is the recipient of the 2013 IEEE Transactions Prize Paper Award, and has been recognized by Intelligent Utility magazine for leadership and benchmark achievements and contributions in technology advancements in large investor-owned electric utilities industry. 

 

 

Afternoon Track  (February 22, 2013  1:00 pm – 5:00 pm)
 Session I Saturday 1:00pm – 5:00pm (Lafayette Park)
Microgrids: Designing Their Role in Smart Grid

Instructor Steve Pullins, Horizon Energy Group

The tutorial introduces the concept and role that Microgrids will play in the evolution of the smart grid. The course material is based on the ongoing implementation of a utility Microgrid and a planned customer-owned Microgrid. Students will be introduced to Microgrid concepts, drivers that influence the Microgrid, as well the projected market for Microgrids. The course will address Microgrid design aspects, engineering considerations, and architectures based on developed used cases. The attendee will leave with an understanding of the key aspects pertaining to designing and implementing a Microgrid. Topics are:

  1. The case for microgrids
  2. Considerations
  3. Use cases and technical architecture
  4. Technical Architecture
  5. Microgrid design
  6. Microgrid marketplace
  7. Overview of a customer-owned Microgrid
  8. Conclusion
steve_pullinsSteven W. Pullins, President of Horizon Energy Group, has more than 30 years of utility industry experience in operations, maintenance, engineering, and renewables project development. He previously led the nation’s Modern Grid Strategy for DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory. He has worked with more than 20 utilities and has led five utility or state Smart Grid implementation planning efforts. Mr. Pullins is the chair of the IEEE PES Intelligent Grid Coordinating Committee and a member of the Smart Grid Interoperability Panel and the OpenSG (Smart Grid) group. He holds a BS and MS in Engineering. 
 Session II Saturday 1:00pm – 5:00pm (Farragut Square)
Smart Grid Governance

Instructors Doug Houseman, EnerNex and TBD 

This course examines a number of questions that need to be considered to keep the grid operating and healthy over its lifetime. The course will focus on the questions regarding management at the utility, as well as regulatory and statutory considerations. The questions include:

  • Once the intelligence is added to the grid, what are the considerations for keeping up and running?
  • When should an investment be refreshed, what are the depreciation and replacement timelines?
  • What are the key metrics to determine the health of the smart grid and its supporting systems, like communications infrastructure?
  • How do you monitor customer participation in the various programs that are supported by the grid and what is the impact of customer involvement?
  • How do you adjust for the changes in customer behavior and equipment installation/usage? Who should be in charge?
  • Should there be one or more than 1 control centers or none at all?
  • How do you manage microgrids in context of the overall grid, as well as all the moving parts of DER as those programs grow? • What is the impact longer term on the needed regulation for the utility?
  • What are the long-term changes that probably will have to happen for distribution tariffs, to keep the grid whole and functioning?
  • When do you turn off the intelligence?
  • What is adequate for security and privacy?

An example governance board and dashboard will also be presented.

doug_housemanDoug Houseman is VP of Technology and Innovations at EnerNex. Doug has worked on smart grid projects around the world. He developed many IEEE PES Smart Grid Tutorials and is working on the IEEE 2050 Grid Vision Project. He is a member of the NIST/EPRI smart grid framework architecture team and helped develop the NIST smart grid framework model. Doug was lead investigator on one of the largest studies on the future of distribution companies over the last 5 years working with more than 100 utilities and 20 governments. Doug has facilitated over 40 single utility smart grid road map sessions in 14 countries. 
 Session III Saturday 1:00pm – 5:00pm (McPherson Square)
(Part II, continued from morning)
 
Implementation of Synchrophasor Systems

Instructor: Vahid Madani, Pacific Gas and Electric Company
(Click here for detailed course abstract and outline)

The electric power industry has experienced significant investment in the deployment of phasor measurement units (PMUs) and the associated infrastructure for making synchrophasor measurements and data collection. From a system reliability standpoint, real-time measurements allow early identification of potential problems both locally and regionally. The distinction of PMU technology comes from its unique ability to provide synchronized power system phasor measurements from widely dispersed locations in an electric power grid. From a broader perspective, the synchrophasor technology offers means to solve a series of challenges, thus attracting the industry worldwide.

This tutorial is intended for the power system practitioners considering investment in synchrophasor technology and the associated business case considerations. In addition to the benefits enabled by technology, the topics covered include understanding phasors, synchronization mechanisms including standards for distributing accurate timing information, the computation processing and accuracy of measurement, performance requirements for phasor data concentrators (PDCs), PDC function descriptions and functional requirements, data aggregation and alignment, configuration set points, and balancing data latency and integrity. Relevant industry standards and guides, phasor data communication and archival, approaches and architectures to build wide-area measurement systems, and applications using synchrophasor data such as situational awareness, advanced warning systems, adaptive protection, state estimation, and voltage stability monitoring will be presented. The tutorial will also include a review of the IEEE guides for installation and testing of PMUs and PDCs, and the need for conformance to the standards and calibration of the entire measurement chain.

vahid_madaniDr. Vahid Madani, Ph.D., P.E, Fellow IEEE – is a technology leader for advanced power systems applications at Pacific Gas and Electric, headquartered in San Francisco, California.  His most recent assignments are associated with grid modernization, reactive compensation, Integration of Protection & Automation for T&D, wide-area advanced warning systems in disaster recovery environment, and deployment of emerging technology and Synchrophasor deployment. Dr. Madani is the Chair of the Performance Standards at NASPI (North American Synchrophasor Initiative), Chair of the IEEE PES Fellows Committee, and Chair of Power System Relaying Committee (PSRC) Working Groups.   He is the recipient of the 2013 IEEE Transactions Prize Paper Award, and has been recognized by Intelligent Utility magazine for leadership and benchmark achievements and contributions in technology advancements in large investor-owned electric utilities industry.