• Echocardiographic Particle Image Velocimetry in Heart Diseases

    Echocardiographic particle image velocimetry (Echo-PIV) is an emerging
    technique to provide us useful information of the left ventricular blood flow and
    vortex in various heart diseases. The audience will understand the potential of
    clinical application of Echo-PIV.

  • Haruhiko Abe is a staff cardiologist and Director of Cardiovascular Ultrasound
    Imaging at Osaka National Hospital, Osaka, Japan. He received medical degree
    from Tottori University, Tottori, Japan in 1999. He completed his cardiology
    fellowship at National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Japan in 2006. He worked
    as a research fellow focusing on echocardiographic particle image velocimetry at
    Mayo Clinic, Arizona, from 2009 to 2010 and at University of California, Irvine,
    from 2010 to 2011.

  • Haruhiko Abe is a staff cardiologist and Director of Cardiovascular Ultrasound
    Imaging at Osaka National Hospital, Osaka, Japan. He received medical degree
    from Tottori University, Tottori, Japan in 1999. He completed his cardiology
    fellowship at National Cardiovascular Center, Suita, Japan in 2006. He worked
    as a research fellow focusing on echocardiographic particle image velocimetry at
    Mayo Clinic, Arizona, from 2009 to 2010 and at University of California, Irvine,
    from 2010 to 2011.

  • Novel Non-Shelled Nanobubbles as a New Ultrasound Imaging and Drug Delivery Tool

    Recently, various nanobubbles for ultrasound contrast imaging are under development. The advantage of nanobubbles is its size which permit more detail images of biological tissues thus making it a superior contrast agent compared to microbubbles. In addition, nanobubble can be used as drug carriers and boosters for sonoporation. Recent advance on this subject will be presented.

  • Katsuro Tachibana, M.D., Ph.D. obtained his clinical and research degrees from Kurume University School of Medicine in 1987. He has been a Professor of Anatomy at Fukuoka University School of Medicine since 1995. He is also a co-founder of EKOS Corporation, the company that first pursued the first commercialization of sonodynamic therapy technology in the 1990s. Dr. Tachibana is interested the clinical applications of microbubbles in ultrasound imaging and therapy, as well as the fundamental science of microbubbles. He is the recipient of the William and Francis Fry Honorary Award and the Mastuo Award in recognition of his contributions to microbubble science and technology.

  • Katsuro Tachibana, M.D., Ph.D. obtained his clinical and research degrees from Kurume University School of Medicine in 1987. He has been a Professor of Anatomy at Fukuoka University School of Medicine since 1995. He is also a co-founder of EKOS Corporation, the company that first pursued the first commercialization of sonodynamic therapy technology in the 1990s. Dr. Tachibana is interested the clinical applications of microbubbles in ultrasound imaging and therapy, as well as the fundamental science of microbubbles. He is the recipient of the William and Francis Fry Honorary Award and the Mastuo Award in recognition of his contributions to microbubble science and technology.

  • Viscoelasticity Measurement in the Liver Using Dispersion Imaging of Shear Wave US Elastography

    Fully quantitative measurements of tissue stiffness can be obtained using shear wave elastography (SWE). When integrated with ultrasound imaging, this method employs acoustic radiation force to generate laterally propagating shear waves (SWs) that can be tracked to determine their velocity. However, not only elasticity, but also viscosity, plays an important role in the SW propagation process in the tissue such as liver. In fact, viscosity itself is a parameter that can be used to evaluate liver disease. It is now well known that dispersion is related to the frequency dependence of the speed of SWs and the attenuation of SWs in the viscous component. If a tissue is dispersive, the speed of SWs and the attenuation of SWs will increase with frequency. Accordingly, analysis of the dispersion properties of SWs can serve as an indirect method for measuring viscosity. I will talk a new US elastographic method which is based on analyzing SW dispersion to quantitatively measure not only the SW speed (which is related to viscoelasticity) but also the dispersion slope (which is related to viscosity) in the liver. The SW speed is a more effective predictor of the degree of fibrosis than the dispersion slope and also suggest that the dispersion slope is a more effective predictor of the degree of necroinflammation than the SW speed. The dispersion slope, which reflects viscosity, may provide additional pathophysiological insight into liver disease.

  • Fuminori Moriyasu, M.D., Ph.D. obtained his clinical and research degrees from Kyoto University School of Medicine in 1975 and 1986 respectively. He is the Director of the Center for Cancer Ablation Therapy at Sanno Hospital, Tokyo, Japan and a Professor at International University of Health and Welfare. He is also Professor Emeritus at Tokyo Medical University, where he was the Chairman and Professor of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology from 2000 to 2016. Dr. Moriyasu has been involved in clinical ultrasound research for over three decades. He is known for his dedicated effort in bringing various new ultrasound techniques to medical practice in Japan, including contrast-enhanced imaging and, more recently, shear wave elastography.

  • Fuminori Moriyasu, M.D., Ph.D. obtained his clinical and research degrees from Kyoto University School of Medicine in 1975 and 1986 respectively. He is the Director of the Center for Cancer Ablation Therapy at Sanno Hospital, Tokyo, Japan and a Professor at International University of Health and Welfare. He is also Professor Emeritus at Tokyo Medical University, where he was the Chairman and Professor of the Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology from 2000 to 2016. Dr. Moriyasu has been involved in clinical ultrasound research for over three decades. He is known for his dedicated effort in bringing various new ultrasound techniques to medical practice in Japan, including contrast-enhanced imaging and, more recently, shear wave elastography.