IEEE Kingston Section

IEEE
September 15th, 2019

IEEE Kingston Section cordially invites all  Section members and their invited guest to a Meet & Greet

Date:  Thursday September 19th, 2019.

Time:  18:00 – 20:00 PM

Location: Cadet Mess, Yeo Hall, Royal Military College, 22 Amiens Ave.

To ensure enough pizzas are ordered, please RSVP to Anthony.Marasco@rmc-cmr.ca

 

 

 


September 15th, 2019

The IEEE Kingston Section is proud to co-sponsor the following technical talk in collaboration with Queens University Faculty of Engineering and Applied Science:

 

WIRELESS INNOVATIONS: EFFECTS ON HUMAN HEALTH

 

Date:  Friday Sept. 20th, 2019.

Time:  02:30 – 04:30 PM

Location: Room 101, Kinesiology  and Health Studies Building, 28 Division Street

Speakers:  Professor Emeritus Anthony B. Miller (University of Toronto), and Professor Emeritus Martin L. Pall (Washington State University)

 

Abstract

During the last decade, the emerging technique of compressed sensing has become a popular subject in signal processing and sensor systems since it can reduce the sampling rate and computational complexity of practical systems without performance loss. The technique of compressed sensing has been successfully applied in signal acquisition, image compression, and data reduction. Based on compressed sensing theory, the original radar echo can be sampled at a lower rate, and then the detection and imaging can be implemented. Although the theory of compressed sensing has been investigated for some radar and localization problems, several important questions have not been answered yet. This presentation introduces the main principle of compressed sensing theory, and then reviews some recent developments in the application of the compressed sensing theory to radar signal processing.

 

Speaker Bio: Anthony B. Miller, MD, FRCP, FRCP(C), FFPH, FACE.

Professor Emeritus, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto. A physician-epidemiologist, he was trained in internal medicine, and was a member of the scientific staff of the Tuberculosis and Chest Diseases Research Unit, UK Medical Research Council, 1962-71. He was Director of the Epidemiology Unit of the National Cancer Institute of Canada 1971-86 and Chair of the Department of Preventive Medicine and Bio-statistics, University of Toronto, 1992-6. He served as a special expert in the Division of Cancer Prevention, US National Cancer Institute, 1997, Senior Epidemiologist, International Agency for Research on Cancer 1998-9, Head, Division of Epidemiology, German Cancer Research Center, Heidelberg, 2000-3, Associate Director, Research, Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, 2008-10. He has been a consultant to the World Health Organization and to its Eastern Mediterranean Region. He is Scientific Lead of the OncoSim micro-simulation modelling initiative of the Canadian Partnership Against Cancer. His research encompasses cancer control, predominantly prevention and screening. He initiated the Canadian National Breast Screening Study in 1980. He became interested in the potential adverse effects of radio frequency radiation
following research he conducted into exposure to electric and magnetic fields of Ontario Hydro workers in inducing leukemia and lymphoma and the effects of such fields in increasing the risk of childhood leukemia..

Speaker Bio: Martin L. Pall. Ph.D.

Professor Emeritus of Biochemistry and Basic Medical Sciences Washington State University. B.A. degree in Physics, Johns Hopkins University, Phi Beta Kappa with Honors, 1962; Ph.D. degree in Biochemistry and Genetics, Caltech, 1968, Asst. Prof. Reed College, 1967-72. Assistant, Associate and Full Professor, Genetics and Cell Biology and Biochemistry/Biophysics, later Professor of Biochemistry and Basic Medical Sciences, Washington State University, 1972-2008. Has received 9 international honors for research in Environmental Medicine and is the author of 103 professional publications. His research since 1998 has focused on mechanisms of chronic disease; oxidative/nitrosative stress; inflammation, mitochondrial dysfunction, other mechanisms; environmental stressors causing chronic disease; regulatory systems acting to prevent chronic disease; chemicals acting to trigger chronic disease via excessive NMDA activity; mechanism of action of electromagnetic fields (EMFs) via activation of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs). Dr. Pall has 8 publications on the EMF VGGC mechanism. The first of these, published in 2013 was placed on the Global Medical Discovery Web site as one of the most important medical papers of 2013. As of July 2019, it has been cited 231 times.

 

For more information, please contact Dr. Jordan Morelli, morelli [at] queensu [dot] ca

 

 

 


July 4th, 2019

The Joint Communications & Computer Chapter of IEEE Kingston Section is proud to present the following IEEE Lecture:

 

APPLICATION OF COMPRESSED SENSING THEORY TO RADAR SIGNAL PROCESSING: TUTORIAL AND RECENT DEVELOPMENTS

 

Date:  Thursday July 11th, 2019.

Time:  10:30 – 11:30 AM

Location: Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Room S4214

Speaker:  Dr. Soheil Salari

 

Abstract

During the last decade, the emerging technique of compressed sensing has become a popular subject in signal processing and sensor systems since it can reduce the sampling rate and computational complexity of practical systems without performance loss. The technique of compressed sensing has been successfully applied in signal acquisition, image compression, and data reduction. Based on compressed sensing theory, the original radar echo can be sampled at a lower rate, and then the detection and imaging can be implemented. Although the theory of compressed sensing has been investigated for some radar and localization problems, several important questions have not been answered yet. This presentation introduces the main principle of compressed sensing theory, and then reviews some recent developments in the application of the compressed sensing theory to radar signal processing.

 

Speaker Bio:

Soheil Salari received all degrees in electrical engineering: Ph.D. from K.N. Toosi University of Technology in 2007, M.Sc. from K.N. Toosi University of Technology in 2001, and B.Sc. From University of Kerman in 1998. He held various research/teaching/engineering positions in Iran until 2011. Since 2011, he has served several research appointments with University of Ontario Institute of Technology (UOIT), University of Toronto, Queen’s University, and RMCC. He also collaborated in several industrial projects. Currently, he is working for the government of Canada as a research scientist. His role has been to carry out research, develop new capabilities, and provide technical advice on topics of artificial intelligence, target tracking, and data fusion. His research interests are in the areas of wireless communications, radar and localization, compressed sensing, digital signal processing, machine learning and artificial intelligence, and optimization theory.

This seminar is open to the general public with free admission and refreshments.

For more information, please contact Dr. François Chan, chan-f@rmc.ca

 

 

 


March 31st, 2019

The Joint Communications & Computer Chapter of IEEE Kingston Section is proud to present the following IEEE distinguished lecture:

 

SECURITY IN SDN/NFV AND 5G NETWORKS – OPPORTUNITIES AND CHALLENGES

&

MOBILITY HANDOVER OPTIMIZATION FRAMEWORK AND IEEE 5G INITIATIVE

 

 

Date:  Tuesday April. 2nd, 2019.

Time:  10:30 AM

Location: Queens University, Walter Light Hall, Room 302

Speaker:  Dr. Ashutosh Dutta

 

Talk 1: Security in SDN/NFV and 5G Networks-Opportunities and Challenges – 30 minutes

Software Defined Networking (SDN) and Network Function Virtualization (NFV) are the key pillars of future networks, including 5G and Beyond that promise to support emerging applications such as enhanced mobile broadband, ultra low latency, massive sensing type applications while providing the resiliency in the network. Service providers and other verticals (e.g., Connected Cars, IOT, eHealth) can leverage SDN/NFV to provide flexible and cost-effective service without compromising the end user quality of service (QoS). While NFV and SDN open up the door for flexible networks and rapid service creation, these offer both security opportunities while also introducing additional challenges and complexities, in some cases. With the rapid proliferation of 4G and 5G networks, operators have now started the trial deployment of network function virtualization, especially with the introduction of various virtualized network elements in the access and core networks. These include elements such as virtualized Evolved Packet Core (vEPC), virtualized IP Multimedia Services (vIMS), Virtualized Residential Gateway, and Virtualized Next Generation Firewalls. However, very little attention has been given to the security aspects of virtualization. While several standardization bodies (e.g., ETSI, 3GPP, NGMN, ATIS, TIA) have started looking into the many security issues introduced by SDN/NFV, additional work is needed with larger security community involvement including vendors, operators, universities, and regulators. This tutorial will address evolution of cellular technologies towards 5G but will largely focus on various security challenges and opportunities introduced by SDN/NFV and 5G networks such as Hypervisor, Virtual Network Functions (VNFs), SDN Controller, Orchestrator, Network slicing, Cloud RAN, and security function virtualization. This tutorial will also highlight some of the ongoing activities within various standards communities and will illustrate a few deployment use case scenarios for security including threat taxonomy for both operator and enterprise networks. In addition, I will also describe some of the ongoing activities within IEEE Future Network initiative including roadmap efforts and various ways one can get involved and contribute to this initiative.

 

Talk 2: Mobility Handover Optimization Framework and IEEE 5G Initiative – 30 minutes

As mobile networks continue to grow and converge with the Internet, new wireless devices and their use are outnumbering the use of fixed network. Mobility management needs to meet the requirements of existing and emerging network technologies and applications. It may be supported in different layers of the network protocol stack. At the IP layer, Mobile IP, an IP-based mobility management, has the advantage of being applicable in any IP-based network, but is faced with many deployment challenges. Numerous variants of Mobile IP have been proposed to address these challenges in different network environments. Research in mobility management has become more active, especially with the mobile networks continuing to evolve from hierarchical towards more flattened network and densification of wireless networks. This talk presents the basics, recent advances, and future directions for mobility protocols at various layers (e.g., network, transport and application). This talk then provides taxonomy of existing mobility protocols, illustrates an abstract mobility model that can be used to support various handoff scenarios. Various handoff optimization methodologies will be explained supported by experimental and simulation results. This talk cites a few deployment scenarios to describe applicability of mobility protocols to various network environments. Finally, the talk goes through the best practices for mobility management and provides some research directions.

 

Speaker Bio:  Ashutosh Dutta is currently Senior Wireless Communication Systems Research Scientist and JHU/APL Sabbatical Fellow at Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Labs (JHU/APL), USA. Most recently he served as Principal Member of Technical Staff at AT&T Labs in Middletown, New Jersey. His career, spanning more than 30 years, includes Director of Technology Security and Lead Member of Technical Staff at AT&T, CTO of Wireless at a Cybersecurity company NIKSUN, Inc., Senior Scientist in Telcordia Research, Director of Central Research Facility at Columbia University, adjunct faculty at NJIT, and Computer Engineer with TATA Motors. He has more than 90 conference and journal publications, three book chapters, and 30 issued patents. Ashutosh is co-author of the book, titled, “Mobility Protocols and Handover Optimization: Design, Evaluation and Application” published by IEEE and John & Wiley that has recently been translated into Chinese Language. Ashutosh served as the chair for IEEE Princeton / Central Jersey Section, Industry Relation Chair for Region 1 and MGA, Pre-University Coordinator for IEEE MGA and vice chair of Education Society Chapter of PCJS. He co-founded the IEEE STEM conference (ISEC) and helped to implement EPICS (Engineering Projects in Community Service) projects in several high schools. Ashutosh currently serves as the Director of Industry Outreach for IEEE Communications Society and is the founding co-chair for IEEE 5G initiative. He also serves as IEEE Communications Society’s Distinguished Lecturer for 2017-2020. Ashutosh serves as the general co-chair for the premier IEEE 5G World Forum. He was recipient of the prestigious 2009 IEEE MGA Leadership award and 2010 IEEE-USA professional leadership award. Ashutosh obtained his BS in Electrical Engineering from NIT Rourkela, India, MS in Computer Science from NJIT, and Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Columbia University under the supervision of Prof. Henning Schulzrinne. Ashutosh is a senior member of IEEE and ACM.

This seminar is open to the general public with free admission, pizza and refreshments.

For more information, please contact Dr. François Chan, chan-f@rmc.ca