Introduction to Imaging Spectrometer Data Analysis: Concepts, Methods and Open Source Software

Introduction to Imaging Spectrometer Data Analysis:
Concepts, Methods and Open Source Software

20 July 2019, 8:00 AM – 4:00 PM
California Institute of Technology, South Mudd Room 162

Register with: David R. Thompson, david.r.thompson@jpl.nasa.gov
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology

Imaging spectroscopy, also known as Hyperspectral Imaging, is revolutionizing remote sensing.  Spectroscopy enables quantitative mapping of materials and chemistry across wide areas.  Future orbital missions by NASA and other agencies will provide these data on global scales.

This is a sequence of hands-on lab experiences using open source code for imaging spectrometer data analysis.  We will introduce the basic concepts behind these instruments, and provide practical experience in visualization, atmospheric correction, and surface property estimation with rigorous uncertainty propagation. We will use the open-source ISOFIT codebase (https://github.com/isofit/isofit) for atmospheric correction, and OpenSPEC for visualization capability similar to that provided in the ENVI interface.  Following the Workshop, tutorial materials will be made available as open source resources for participants to use in their own courses.

Participants should bring a laptop.  We will provide Python library installation instructions in advance

Tentative Agenda
8:00 AM    Setup
8:30        Introduction to imaging spectroscopy
              Covariance, dimensionality, and noise
              Linear dimensionality reduction
              Spectral subspaces and angles
10:00       Questions and break
11:30         Atmospheric correction
              Linear mixture models and continuua
              The Matched Filter
              Partial Least Squares  Regression
12:00 PM    Lunch break
1:00         Radiometric Calibration
              Spectral Calibration and Noise Estimation
2:30          Questions and Break
3:00        Optimal Estimation methods
              Other Advanced topics in Optimal Estimation
4:00           Adjourn

Convener: Dr. David R. Thompson is a researcher and Technical Group Lead in the Imaging Spectroscopy group at the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory. He is Science Lead for NASA’s EMIT mission, and Investigation Scientist for the AVIRIS imaging spectrometers. He is recipient of the NASA Early Career Achievement Medal and the JPL Lew Allen Award.

Directions: South Mudd is located at the corner of California and Wilson, in the California Institute of Technology. We will use the East entrance, and meet in room 162. Parking is available in the underground lot to the South, as indicated on the map.

Acknowledgements: A portion of this research was performed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology. We acknowledge the support of a PRISM AITT grant from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth Science Technology Office. We acknowledge the support of the JPL and Caltech Presidents’ and Directors’ Fund Program. We thank other supporting sponsors including the NASA Earth Science Division for the HyspIRI preparatory campaign, the AVIRIS-NG instrument and the data analysis program “Utilization of Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometer Next Generation Data from an Airborne Campaign in India” NNH16ZDA001N-AVRSNG, for its support of the algorithm development; the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Research and Technology Development Program; and the NASA Center Innovation Fund managed in conjunction with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory Office of the Chief Scientist and Technologist. Copyright 2019 California Institute of Technology. US Government Support Acknowledged.

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Machine Learning Application for Satellite Image Analysis

The IEEE Los Angeles Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Chapter Present a Special Lecture Event!

Machine Learning Application for Satellite Image Analysis: Methods and Case Studies

Vinay Viswambharan, Shairoz Sohail, and Sangeet Mathew
Esri Image Team and Esri A.I. Team

Thursday, May 30, 2018
5:30–7:30 PM

Arms Laboratory, Sharp Lecture Hall
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena, California

About the Talk: Remote sensing specialists from academia and industry have been using the latest progress in artificial intelligence to find more efficient and accurate methods to extract knowledge from the huge collection of satellite images accumulated in the past 30 years. In this talk, members from Esri’s imagery and A.I. teams will explain the technical details of using cutting edge machine learning and deep learning methods to analyze multi-source remote sensing data. The methods will be presented in an intuitive way and accessible to those with a light coding background. They will present use cases of using machine learning tools on Esri’s collection of remote sensing imagery to solve real world problems such as quickly detecting polluted swimming pools, identifying the unhealthy palm trees, and detecting damaged structures and roads post disaster. The presenters will also share their experiences about working at Esri and where the future of A.I and remote sensing is headed.

About the Speakers:

Vinay Viswambharan is a product manager on the Imagery team at Esri, with a zeal for remote sensing and everything imagery. He has been working in geospatial industry for 20 years. He is also very active in developing case study classes for the Esri LearnGIS and MOOC program.

 

Sharioz Sohail is a data scientist on Esri’s GeoAI team. He works mainly on building deep learning models for aerial and satellite imagery, LiDar, drone feeds, and live video. He routinely solves problems from object detection and tracking, image classification, semantic segmentation, NLP, and other areas.

 

Sangeet Mathew is a senior software engineer at Esri. He is an experienced Product Engineer. His work focuses on Software QA, Programming Languages, Agile Methodologies, Software Design & Machine Learning. Certified in A.I. & Deep Learning.

 

Directions and Parking: Parking on the Caltech campus is accessible from Michigan Avenue, south of Del Mar Avenue. Parking is free after 5 pm. Arms Lab location: http://www.caltech.edu/map/charles-arms-laboratory-of-the-geological-sciences

Reservation: Please RSVP with your IEEE membership # to la.grss.officers@ieee.org. You are welcome to bring your spouse as a guest. Non-members can go to www.ieee.org/join, then send your membership number.

Please see the event flyer for agenda and other details.

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ATLIS: Advanced Technology Land Imaging Spectroradiometer: a Next Generation Sustainable Land Imager

The IEEE Los Angeles Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Chapter and University of Southern California Present a Special Lecture Event!

ATLIS: Advanced Technology Land Imaging Spectroradiometer: a Next Generation Sustainable Land Imager

Dr. Jeff Puschell
Principal Engineering Fellow and Chief Scientist Space Systems at Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems in El Segundo

Wednesday, Oct 24, 2018
6:00–8:00 PM

EEB 132, Viterbi School of Engineering
University of Southern California,
Los Angeles, CA 90089

About the Talk: The Advanced Technology Land Imaging Spectroradiometer (ATLIS) is a small (0.04 m3), multispectral pushbroom imager to provide visible through shortwave (VSWIR) calibrated imagery for the Sustainable Land Imaging-Technology (SLI-T) reference mission architecture (RMA).

ATLIS is designed to provide imaging spectroradiometry that meets SLI-T RMA key parameters with an instrument that is much smaller and much less massive than previous land imaging systems.

This presentation describes a NASA ESTO funded project to design, build and test a six spectral band prototype ATLIS called ATLIS-P that will establish whether this compact, low mass design approach with wide field of view (WFOV), free form reflective telescope, large format, small detector digital FPA and on-chip processing meets SLI-T RMA VSWIR requirements. ATLIS is supported by NASA ESTO through grant NNX16AP64G.

About the Speaker: Dr. Jeff Puschell is Principal Engineering Fellow and Chief Scientist, Space Systems at Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems in El Segundo, California. He is an internationally recognized expert in the system engineering of space-based imaging and remote sensing systems. His 30+ years of experience is broadly based and includes leading and making major contributions to development of visible-infrared instruments for space-based research and operational environmental imaging and remote sensing, development and field testing of laser-based communication and remote sensing systems and building and using millimeter, infrared, visible and ultraviolet wavelength instrumentation for ground-based astronomy. Dr. Puschell has been Principal Investigator, Technical Director, Chief Engineer, Chief Scientist or Project Manager on more than 15 projects in space-based remote sensing and laser communication. He has authored or co- authored 130+ papers on a variety of topics in space-based imaging and remote sensing, optical communication and astrophysics. Dr. Puschell is co-editor and co-author for the leading reference book Space Mission Engineering: The New SMAD. He is a Fellow of the AIAA and SPIE.

Directions and Parking: Parking Reservations @ Downey Way Structure ($12.00 / Day) at USC Viterbi School of Engineering accessible off Exposition Blvd, University Park, Los Angeles, CA 90089: Directions

Reservation: Please RSVP at Eventbrite jere: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/atlis-advanced-technology-land-imaging-spectroradiometer-lecture-event-tickets-50099738667

WebEx Information: If you cannot join in person, please join in remotely through WebEx: https://ieeemeetings.webex.com/ieeemeetings/j.php?MTID=m32c824c7b991d69f27ec0ca42bde71a7
Meeting number: 597 555 127
Meeting password: sm4d3XFZ

Contact information: Please contact us at la.grss.officers@ieee.org if you have any questions

Please see the event flyer for agenda and other details.

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Talk on Visual Pattern Recognition

IEEE Foothill Section Computer Society Chapter Meeting

Wednesday July 11, 2018
DeVry University Pomona

Room 210 (40 seats available, RSVP required)

901 Corporate Center Dr., Pomona, CA 91768
https://www.devry.edu/universities/california/pomona-campus.html

Free parking available around the building, located near the intersection of the I-10 & 57 Freeways; see link for directions.

Agenda
7:00 P.M. – 7:20 P.M. Networking – Pizza & soda provided
7:20 P.M. – 7:30 P.M. Announcements/Intros – Bill Grist, Computer Society Chair
7:30 P.M. – 8:45 P.M. Presentation/Lecture
8:45 P.M. – 9:00 P.M. Questions & Answers

Topic: Visual Pattern Recognition …
 Speaker: Brad Morantz, Ph.D.,
 IEEE Computer Society Phoenix Chapter

Abstract: Biological Neural Processing As a Paradigm for Visual Pattern Recognition

            Many of us are aware that human (and animal) visual imaging and pattern recognition can outperform that of our best computer systems.  Imagine if we could emulate some of this power and use it in our defense and intelligence systems.

            This lecture will begin by explaining what this biological vision processing is and how it works, to the best knowledge of our current science.  Sensing, image processing and formation, and finally pattern recognition will be covered.  This will be compared to various implementations of computer vision and then there will be some models, discussion, and ideas on how we can further implement these concepts from nature into our systems.

  • Image recognition, it is not just looking at something
  • What is the organ of vision?
  • Do I see what I think I see?
  • How do we see?
  • Image Pattern recognition is not just about seeing something
  • Understanding how we recognize what we think we see

About the Speaker

Dr. Morantz has a B.S. in C.I.S. and E.E., a M.S. and Ph.D. in Decision Science, a mixture of mathematical science, psychology, and computer science. He has additional post doctoral course work in Computational BioScience, Computer Science, statistical design methodology, and Design Analysis Simulation Experiments (DASE).  Dr. Morantz has published and presented on neural networks, multiprocessing mathematics, biologically inspired computing architecture, data-mining, and intelligent decision making. His current research is in biologically inspired computing for intelligent decision making. He is currently Sr Staff Scientist for Bluemont Technology & Research, Inc of McLean VA. He is also on the editorial board of the International Journal of Data Mining, Modeling, and Management. Regarding IEEE, he is a senior IEEE member and Vice Chair of the Phoenix IEEE Computer Society.  He is also a member of the IEEE Computational Intelligence Society and his website is www.machine-cognition.com

All Students & the Public Are Welcome to Attend

Event Sponsored by DeVry University – www.devry.edu IEEE Foothill Section – www.ieee-foothill.org

Please RSVP  at https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ieee-computer-soc-visual-pattern-recognition-presentation-devry-july-11-2018-tickets-47485221576
RSVP no later than 2pm on July 11, 2018

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WCOM: a new Chinese satellite mission for studies of the global water cycle

The Metro LA GRSS Talk from May 30, 2018 on WCOM by Dr. Jiancheng Shi can now be viewed online at:  https://ieeemeetings.webex.com/ieeemeetings/ldr.php?RCID=002a653f47debb410533ce0e906f0385

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WCOM: a new Chinese satellite mission for studies of the global water cycle

The IEEE Los Angeles Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Chapter Present a Special Lecture Event!

WCOM: a new Chinese satellite mission for studies of the global water cycle

Dr. Jiancheng Shi
State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science, Beijing, China

Wednesday, May 30, 2018
5:30–7:30 PM

Arms Laboratory, Sharp Lecture Hall
California Institute of Technology
Pasadena, California

About the Talk: The Water Cycle Observation Mission (WCOM) is the first Earth science driven satellite mission of China with the most synergetic capabilities for global water cycle observations. WCOM is currently under engineering phase and will be launched around 2020.

WCOM aims to measure the global water cycle under global changes through synchronous acquisition of its key elements in an accurate manner. Key elements including soil moisture, ocean salinity, snow water equivalent, soil freeze-thaw, atmospheric water vapor, precipitation and other associated parameters will be measured by improving the accuracy and synchronization. The resulted consistent and accurate datasets will enable us to refine the long-term satellite observations over the past decades, and to represent the changing trend in hydrological elements which are needed for global change studies.

The mission concept of WCOM satellite is a combination of active and passive microwave remote sensors with a wide frequency coverage. The WCOM satellite will be flown with a 6:00 am/pm sun synchronous polar orbit at about 600 km height. The WCOM satellite design provides not only the most sensitive microwave information of the target element but also the environmental variables which are needed in the retrieval algorithms.

About the Speaker: Dr. Jiancheng Shi received his B.A. in Hydrogeology and Engineering Geology from the University of Lanzhou in China, and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Geography from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) in 1982, 1987, and 1991, respectively.  He then worked the Institute for Computational Earth System Sciences (later Earth Research Institute) at UCSB as a research professor.  In 2010, he joint Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences as director and senior research scientist at the State Key Laboratory of Remote Sensing Science in Beijing, China. His research interests are microwave remote sensing of water cycle related components. He has published more than 300 journal and conference papers. He is a PI of Chinese Global Water Cycle Mission and Fellows of IEEE and SPIE.

Directions and Parking: Parking on the Caltech campus is accessible from Michigan Avenue, south of Del Mar Avenue. Parking is free after 5 pm. Arms Lab location: http://www.caltech.edu/map/charles-arms-laboratory-of-the-geological-sciences

Reservation: Please RSVP with your IEEE membership # to la.grss.officers@ieee.org. You are welcome to bring your spouse as a guest. Non-members can go to www.ieee.org/join, then send your membership number.

Please see the event flyer for agenda and other details.

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Earth, Air, Fire, & Water: Monitoring Natural Hazards in California

Special Panel Event at the Northrop Grumman Azusa Campus sponsored by Northrop Grumman and the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society Chapter in Los Angeles!

Earth, Air, Fire, & Water: Monitoring Natural Hazards in California

Thursday, May 10, 2018
5:00–7:00 PM

Northrop Grumman Campus
Azusa, California

Panel Members

  • Andrea Donnelan, Principal Investigator of NASA’s GeoGateay project, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA
  • Mark Jackson. NOAA Meteorologist In Charge (MIC) for Los Angeles& Oxnard, CA
  • Tom Pagano, Systems Architect and Project Manager at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA

RSVP: 

US Citizen: To attend, please RSVP here: https://goo.gl/forms/Bzez1rvf5G8R454z2 by Tuesday, May 8th. It is pertinent that you RSVP byTuesday, May 8th so that an accurate Northrop Grumman visitor list can be generated allowing a seamless security check-in process.  If you have any problem, please email la.grss.officers@ieee.org.

Non-US Citizen: The deadline for RSVP has passed, sorry!

Directions:  Northrop Grumman is easily accessible from the 210 freeway with entrances and exits just east of campus off Vernon Avenue. Please see the Northrop Grumman Visitor’s Guide for detailed directions.

Parking:  Parking is available outside the Building 59, Executive Lobby on Hollyvale Street (as indicated on map). Additionally, there is an overflow parking lot just southeast of Bldg. 59, off 3rd street. Parking is free and unlimited.

Check-in:  Check-in will be located in Northrop Grumman’s Building 59, Executive Lobby from 5:00pm-5:45pm. Northrop Grumman is a closed campus and all visitors are required to furnish proof of identification prior to entering the campus.

Please see the flyer for more information.

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Laser Cooling and Trapping on ISS

OSSC and IEEE GRSS and Photonics Chapters in Metropolitan Los Angeles Present a Special Lecture & Dinner Event!

Laser Cooling and Trapping on ISS

Dr. Rob Thompson
Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Wednesday, April 11, 2018
6:00–8:00 PM

St. Gregory Church
2215 East Colorado Boulevard
Pasadena, California

About the Talk: Microgravity offers a wealth of advantages for studies of ultra-cold atomic gases and their applications.  These include the ability to achieve exceptionally low temperatures via expansion into very weak traps, which don’t need to be supported against gravity and the ability to achieve very long interaction times with samples that have been released from traps. The Cold Atom Laboratory (CAL) will be a flexible, multi-user ultra-cold atom facility that will enable the precise study of quantum gases at effective temperatures well below the coldest achievable on Earth. CAL will launch to the International Space Station in early 2018, giving scientists a unique window into the quantum world.  CAL is supported by SLPS and ISS-PO. Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the California Institute of Technology.

About the Speaker: Dr. Rob Thompson developed the mission concept for the Cold Atom Lab, and is the Project Scientist for the project. He has over twenty-five years of research experience and numerous publications in atomic and molecular physics, laser physics, and cavity quantum electrodynamics. His current research interests include studies of degenerate quantum gases in microgravity; space-based quantum sensors; and optical clocks. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Texas at Austin.

Visit here for Registration & Details

Please see the event flyer for agenda and other details.

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Metro LA IEEE GRSS Panel Discussion Event 

SAVE THE DATE

Metro LA IEEE GRSS Panel Discussion Event 

“Fire and Water: How Are We Monitoring Natural Hazards in Southern California?”

Thursday, May 10, 2018, 5-7 PM
Northrop Grumman, Azusa

 Last year’s panel event was so successful that we are doing another again this year.  Don’t miss out this time if you didn’t make it last time.  This year’s topic is “Fire and Water: How Are We Monitoring Natural Hazards in Southern California?”.  We are lining up experts in sensor fabrication and users of the data in the field.  Stay tuned for more information to register.  Registration will be required by April 19th  to gain access to the facility.

More details to follow in near future.

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GRSS Webinar: Airborne Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging for Mineral Mapping

GRSS Webinar: Airborne Thermal Infrared Hyperspectral Imaging for Mineral Mapping

Alexandrine Huot
Wednesday, January 24, 2018
10:00 AM Pacific Time (6:00 PM GMT/UTC)

Next Tuesday’s speaker is Alexandrine Huot, a Field Application Scientist for Telops, who will demonstrate the benefits of using thermal infrared hyperspectral imaging (TIR HSI) for mineral mapping during an airborne survey, in this case carried out over an open-pit mine in the Thetford Mines (Qc, Canada) area. The results show how the high spectral resolution data provided by the Telops Hyper-Cam airborne system facilitates temperature emissivity separation (TES) and atmospheric correction in order to retrieve a thermodynamic temperature map of the area and its associated spectral emissivity datacube. Mineral mapping of various minerals such as lizardite, serpentinite and quartz was achieved through linear unmixing of the emissivity data using reference emissivity curves found in spectral libraries. The results illustrate the potential of TIR HSI for airborne mapping of silicate minerals. 

The lecture will be broadcast live from Quebec, Canada at 4:00PM GMT/UTC on February 13. (This is 8:00AM February 13, US Eastern Time.)

If you would like to tune in to this free webinar, click here to register.

For more information on the lecture, visit the event description page.

 

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