IEEE Miami Section

IEEE
March 26th, 2014

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

Distributed Control and Plug-n-Play Operation of Distribution Networks and Microgrids

by Dr. Zhihua Qu,

Professor and Chair of ECE, University of Central Florida, Orlando

Date: Friday, March 28, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM – 11:00 PM
Place:  FIU Engineering Center, EC 1115
10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida

Abstract:
In a smart grid, unpredictable and distributed generation must be seamlessly and autonomously incorporated into the operation of distribution networks and microgrids. In this talk, a plug-n-play design is presented for the general class of cyber-physical cooperative systems which consist of individual heterogeneous nonlinear physical systems, a physical network, and a network of intermittent local communication channels. By introducing a simple impact coefficient to quantify interactions among heterogeneous physical systems, a fully modular design methodology is proposed to separately design individual feedback controls of physical systems and network-level cooperative control, and their combination enables plug-n-play operation of the overall networked physically-constrained systems. For distribution networks and microgrids, the proposed control design renders distributed cooperative control/optimization algorithms that enable distributed VAR compensation, loss minimization and optimal dispatch of aggregate active power from distributed generation units. Sample results will be presented to illustrate their effectiveness.

Short Bio:

Dr. Qu received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering at the Georgia Institute of Technology in June 1990. Since then, he has been with the University of Central Florida (UCF). Currently, he is a Professor and the Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering, the PI and Director of DoE-funded FEEDER center, and the SAIC Endowed Professor at UCF. Dr. Qu is the author of three books, including Robust Control of Nonlinear Uncertain Systems by John Wiley & Sons (1998) and Cooperative Control of Dynamical Systems by Springer Verlag (2009). He is a Fellow of IEEE and AAAS, he is serving on the board of ECEDHA, and he is/was an Associate Editor for Automatica, IEEE ACCESS, IEEE Transactions on Automatic Control.


January 21st, 2014

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

The Development and Future of Antenna Arrays

by Randy L. Haupt

Professor and Chair, Colorado School of Mines

Date: Friday, Jan 24, 2014
Time: 10:00 AM – 11:00 PM
Place:  Room no.1115,ECE Department, FIU
10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida

Abstract:

Large antennas create the high gain needed to boost the received signal for a communications or radar system. Today, reflectors and arrays compete for large aperture jobs in many types of systems. In general, the reflector is relatively inexpensive, that is why it is the antenna of choice for commercial activities, such as satellite TV. If the reflector must be moved in order to locate or track a signal, then the gimbals, servomotors, and other mechanical parts become a reliability and maintenance issue that becomes a significant lifecycle cost. Also, mechanical steering might be too slow to meet some of the demands on platforms such as airplanes. The array – in particular, the phased array – makes many performance promises but for a price.

Some of the unique features of a phased array antenna include:

  1. Fast, wide angle scanning without moving the antenna.
  2. Adaptive beamforming
  3. Graceful degradation in performance over time
  4. Distributed aperture
  5. Multiple beams
  6. Potential for low radar cross section

This paper presents the historical development of array antennas. Reflectors have a rich history in optics that started thousands of years ago. Arrays, on the other hand, are only a little more than 100 years old, while phased arrays are only a little more than 70 years old. This presentation introduces the antenna array concept and provides a historical development of the array from the very beginning until the present with a peak into the future. Many examples and pictures will be presented.

Short Bio:

Randy L. Haupt received the BSEE from the USAF Academy (1978), the MS in Engineering Management from Western New England College (1982), the MSEE from Northeastern University (1983), and the PhD in EE from The University of Michigan (1987). He is Professor and Department Head of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the Colorado School of Mines and was an RF Staff Consultant at Ball Aerospace & Technologies, Corp., a Senior Scientist and Department Head at the Applied Research Laboratory of Penn State, Professor and Department Head of ECE at Utah State, Professor and Chair of EE at the University of Nevada Reno, and Professor of EE at the USAF Academy. He was a project engineer for the OTH-B radar and a research antenna engineer for Rome Air Development Center early in his career. Dr. Haupt’s research interests and expertise spans a wide range of topics in electromagnetics that include theoretical, numerical, and experimental projects. He is co-author of the books Practical Genetic Algorithms, 2 ed., John Wiley & Sons, 2004, Genetic Algorithms in Electromagnetics, John Wiley & Sons, 2007, and Introduction to Adaptive Antennas, SciTech, 2010, as well as author of Antenna Arrays a Computation Approach, John Wiley & Sons, 2010. Dr. Haupt was the Federal Engineer of the Year in 1993 and is a Fellow of the IEEE and Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES). He is a member of the IEEE Antenna Standards Committee and the IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society representative to the National Academy of Sciences Union of Radio Science. He serves as an Associate Editor for the “Ethically Speaking” column in the IEEE AP-S Magazine.


December 18th, 2013

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

Breaking Barriers in Controlling the Mind

by Dr. Sakhrat Khizroev

Professor and Director, Center for Personalized Nanomedicine

Florida International University

Date: Thursday, Dec 19, 2013
Time: 12:00 PM – 1:00 PM
Place:  Room no. EC-3753, FIU
10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida

Abstract:

In February 2013, President Obama announced the plan to start the Brain Activity Map (BAM) Project, a 15-year initiative aimed at charting the entire circuitry of the human brain. Today, there is no practical way to directly map the electric field in response to the neural activity; nor is there a way to remotely stimulate the neural activity deep in the brain. A few years ago, we proposed to use energy-efficient magneto-electric nanoparticles (MENs) to bridge remote magnetic fields with the intrinsic electric fields deep in the brain and thus enable both electric-field mapping and remotely-controlled stimulation. Like the conventional magnetic nanoparticles (MNs), used as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agents, the MENs have a non-zero magnetic moment and therefore their spatial distribution can be controlled remotely via an external magnetic field gradient. In addition, unlike the conventional MNs, MENs display an entirely new property, which is the non-zero magneto-electric (ME) effect. This ME coupling can be used to enable remote stimulation of selective regions in the brain as well as sensing the local electric field induced by the neural activity in the brain. To use MENs for electric-field mapping, the new nanoparticles must be used together with an existing magnetic imaging technique such as MRI or the recently emerged magnetic nanoparticle imaging (MNI). In this case, MENs modulate the typical structural image obtained by MRI with the local electric field. Moreover, when used with MNI, MENs can be used for field mapping in real time (with a temporal resolution in the microsecond range). The potential applications span from the prevention and treatment of neurological disorders to opening a pathway to the fundamental understanding of the brain which potentially could lead to reverse-engineering the brain. Further, MNI in conjunction with MENs is suitable for real-time studies of the neural activity field dynamics deep in the brain to understand less known intrinsic processes. This talk will summarize the current findings of our in-vitro and in-vivo studies.

Short Bio:

Dr.Sakhrat Khizroev is an inventor with an expertise in nanomagnetic/spintronic devices. With background in physics and electrical engineering, his current research focus is at the intersection of nanoengineering and medicine. He is a Professor at both College of Engineering and College of Medicine. From 2006 to 2010, Dr. Khizroev was a tenured Professor at the Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Riverside (UCR), where his group conducted several groundbreaking demonstrations in the area of nanoelectronics and nanodiagnostics. Perpendicular magnetic recording (PMR), three-dimensional (3-D) magnetic memory and Nanolasers for 5-nm diagnostics, low-damping spin-oscillator devices are some of the pioneering and patented technologies which emerged under the supervision of Dr. Khizroev. PMR is currently the main technology in the multi-billion-dollar data storage industry. Prior to his academic career, Prof. Khizroev spent almost four years as a Research Staff Member with Seagate Research (1999-2003) and one year as a Doctoral Intern with IBM Almaden Research Center (1997-1998). He holds over 30 granted US patents and several international patents. He has authored over 120 refereed papers, 1 book and many book chapters in the broad area of nanomagnetic/spintronic devices. He is a Fellow of National Academy of Inventors (NAI). He has acted as a guest science and technology commentator on television and radio programs across the globe. He has served as an Editor for IEEE Transactions on Nanotechnology, Nanotechnology, and IEEE Transactions on Magnetics and sits on editorial boards of several Science and Technology journals. Khizroev received a M.S. in Physics and Quantum Electronics from Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology in 1994 and a PhD in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Carnegie Mellon University in 1999.


November 15th, 2013

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

Wide-Area Control of Power Systems using Synchrophasors:
Theory, Design and Experiments

by Aranya Chakrabortty, PhD

Assistant Professor of Electrical Engineering

FREEDM Systems Center, NC State University

Date: Friday, Nov 22, 2013
Time: 10:00 AM – 11:00 PM
Place:  Room no.1107,ECE Department, FIU
10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida

Abstract:

A key element in the development of smart power transmission systems over the past decade is the tremendous advancement of the Wide-Area Measurement System (WAMS) technology, also commonly referred to as the Synchrophasor technology. Significant research efforts have been made on techniques to use WAMS for monitoring and situational awareness of large power networks dispersed across wide geographical areas. In contrast, use of WAMS for automatic feedback control has received less attention from the research community. The objective of this talk is to bridge this gap by formulating wide-area control problems for oscillation damping and voltage control. We will pose four distinct control-theoretic problems. The first problem will be on using PMU measurements from selected nodes in a power system to identify reliable dynamic models with related discussions on identifiability and PMU placement. The remaining three problems will be to employ these models for designing output feedback damping controllers via control inversion, model predictive control, and energy function based methods. Some initial results on how these control mechanisms may be implemented in a distributed way on top of any typical arbitrated communication network with inherent time-delays will also be presented. Results will be illustrated using examples from the US west coast grid (WECC), as well as real-time simulations from the BEN-WAMS testbed recently developed at NC State.

Short Bio:
Aranya Chakrabortty received his B.E. degree from Jadavpur University, India in 2004, and his MS and Ph.D degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, NY in 2005 and 2008, respectively, all in Electrical Engineering. From 2008-2009 he was appointed as a postdoctoral research associate in the Aeronautics and Astronautics department of the University of Washington, Seattle. From 2009-2010 he was a faculty member in the Electrical and Computer Engineering department of Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas. Since fall 2010 Aranya has joined the ECE department of North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC as an Assistant Professor. His research interests are in all branches of control system theory and applications, with a particular focus on electric power system networks. He is currently a part of the FREEDM Systems Center in NCSU, and is involved with several system and control theoretic research problems for the US power grid using synchrophasor technology, and its integration with renewable energy sources such as wind energy. He contributes actively to NASPI (North American Synchrophasor Initiative), and is a member of IEEE Control Systems Society and IEEE Power and Energy Society.

For further Information Contact:
IEEE VT/COM Chapter Chair Tel: (305)-348-2935, Miami Section Contact Information: Mr. Yogeswar Ramineni, yrami039@fiu.edu

Some of the pictures from the event:


November 12th, 2013

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

FREEDM Systems: the Energy Internet

by Alex Huang, PhD

Professor of Electrical Engineering

FREEDM Systems Center, NC State University

Date: Wednesday, Nov 13, 2013
Time: 1:45 PM – 2:45 PM
Place:  Room no.1115,ECE Department, FIU
10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida

Abstract:
In this talk the author will provide an overview of the research conducted at the NSF funded
FREEDM Systems Center. The Future Electric Energy Delivery and Management (FREEDM) System is a novel
architecture suitable for plug-and-play of distributed renewable energy and distributed energy storage devices.
Motivated by the success of the Information Internet, the architecture was put forward by the NSF FREEDM
Systems Center as a possible roadmap for an automated and flexible electric power distribution system. In the
Information Internet, people share information in a plug and play manner. In the envisioned ‘Energy Internet’,
a vision for sharing of the energy is proposed for ordinary citizen and home owners. Key technologies required
to achieve such a vision are discussed. Among many of the key technologies, the development of advanced
power semiconductor devices and power electronics systems will be discussed and highlighted.

Short Bio:
Dr. Alex Huang received his B.Sc. degree from Zhejiang University, China in 1983 and his M.Sc. degree from Chengdu Institute of Radio Engineering, China in 1986, both in electrical engineering. He received his Ph.D. from Cambridge University, UK in 1992. From 1994 to 2004, he was a professor at Center for Power Electronics System at Virginia Tech. Since 2004, he has been a professor of electrical engineering at North Carolina State
University and director of NCSU’s Semiconductor Power Electronics Center (SPEC). He is now the Progress Energy Distinguished Professor and the director of the NSF FREEDM Systems ERC. He is also the director of NCSU’s Advanced Transportation Energy Center (ATEC). Dr. Huang’s research areas are power management, emerging applications of
power electronics and power semiconductor devices. He has published more than 350 papers in journals and conference proceedings, and holds 20 US patents. Dr. Huang is also a fellow of IEEE and Zhejiang University Qiushi Chair Professor.

For further Information Contact:
IEEE VT/COM Chapter Chair Tel: (305)-348-2935, Miami Section Contact Information: Mr. Yogeswar Ramineni, yrami039@fiu.edu


October 24th, 2013

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

The Adaptive Adversary: Investigating the Human Element in Power Grid Cyberattacks

by Aunshul Rege, PhD

Assistant Professor of the Criminal Justice Department

Temple University

Date: Friday, Nov 01, 2013
Time: 10:00 AM – 11:00 AM
Place:  Room no.1107,ECE Department, FIU
10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida

Abstract:
A considerable amount of technical research exists on power grid security, focusing on attack
techniques, exploitable vulnerabilities, system access points, and case study analysis. While important,
this research focuses only on the tactical aspects of cybercrimes and views attackers as passive agents,
downplaying their underlying strategies. None of this research integrates or even utilizes any
understanding of the human agents conducting cyberattacks. It is a fundamental weakness in our current
regime of cybersecurity. This talk portrays the adversary as an active agent, who engages in an evolving
decision-making process, and utilizes a combination of technical and non-technical attack vectors.
Acknowledging the dynamic nature of adversaries and the hybridity of power grid cyberattacks are
crucial in moving from existing reactionary “knee-jerk” tactical defenses to anticipatory strategic defense
measures.

Short Bio:

Dr. Rege has over eight years of experience in researching cyberattacks from a criminological perspective. She has studied critical infrastructure cybercrimes, focusing on the organizational dynamics of adversaries and their modus operandi, adversarial decision-making and decision trees, the anatomy and ‘hybridity’ (cyber-physical relationships) of cyberattacks, and trend analyses.

Speaker Contact Information: : Department of Criminal Justice Gladfelter Hall, 5th floor, Temple University, 1115 Polett Walk, Philadelphia PA, 19122

For further Information Contact:

IEEE VT/COM Chapter Chair Tel: (305)-348-2935

Miami Section Contact Information: Mr. Yogeswar Ramineni, yrami039@fiu.edu


October 14th, 2013

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

Fault Tolerant and Efficient Electric Drive Technologies for E-Mobility

by Professor Babak Fahimi, PhD

Director of Renewable Energy and Vehicular Technology Laboratory

University of Texas at Dallas

Date: Tuesday, Oct 22, 2013
Time: 11:00 AM
Place:  ECE Department, FIU
10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida
ECE Conference Room (EC 1115)

Abstract:
Power electronic driven adjustable speed motor drives play a central role in electrification of the transportation industry. It is in this context that development of fault resilient, highly efficient, compact, and cost effective electric traction systems can catalyze a seamless transition to e-mobility. To address these challenges innovative magnetic design, power electronic design, sensors and control mechanisms, and novel integrations methods are required. An evaluation of the-state-of-the-art indicates that research and development in all of the above categories are far from exhausted. Furthermore, given the size of the automotive market, issues such as supply chain of components, quality control, manufacturing, and the use of cyber systems ought to be taken into account for future. This talk will provide the audience with the opportunities and challenges related to the electric traction, its current status, and future priorities.

Short Bio: Dr. Babak Fahimi received his PhD in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University in 1999. Dr. Fahimi has co-authored 225 (60 Journal and 165 peer reviewed conference papers) scientific articles, 15 book chapters, and several technical reports in
the general area of adjustable speed motor drives and power electronics. He holds nine US patents and has six more pending.

Speaker Contact Information: Professor Professor Babak Fahimi,Director of Renewable Energy and Vehicular Technology Laboratory, University of Texas at Dallas.

For further Information Contact:

Dr. Arif Islam , arislam@fiu.edu, IEEE VT/COM Chapter Chair Tel: (305)-348-2935

Miami Section Contact Information: Mr. Yogeswar Ramineni, yrami039@fiu.edu


August 12th, 2013

IEEE Miami Section in Conjunction with Energy Systems Research Laboratory at Florida International University is pleased to invite you to lecture on

Distributed Control and Operation of Hybrid Power Systems Involving DC Microgrids

by Dr.Ahmed Mohamed
Assistant professor at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the City University of New York

Date: Tuesday, August 13th, 2013
Time: 11:00 AM to 12:00 PM
Place: Room-EC 3960, Energy Systems Research Laboratory, FIU College of Engineering and Computing, 10555 W. Flagler Street, Miami, Florida, 33174.

Abstract: Efficient and reliable techniques for power delivery and utilization are needed to account for the increased penetration of renewable energy sources in electric power systems. Such methods are also required for current and future demands of plug-in electric vehicles and high-demand power electronic loads. Distributed control and optimal power network architectures will lead to viable solutions to the energy management issue with a high level of reliability and security. This presentation aims at presenting and verifying new techniques for distributed control by deploying DC microgrids, involving distributed renewable generation and energy storage, through the operating AC power system.

A power system architecture involving AC and DC networks, both with distributed generations and demands will be presented as an example of the distributed hybrid power systems. The DC microgrid’s design involves the design and development of several power conditioning units including DC-DC converters, voltage source inverters (VSI) and AC-DC rectifiers. Ideas on how to coordinate the controllers of these converters, and how to manage the bi-directional communication and energy transfer between each of the microgrids and the main grid will be presented.

In addition, the control and operation of the hybrid AC/DC power system will be investigated. The energy available from renewable sources and storage assets on the microgrids can be used to solve operational problems on the main grid. Real-time energy management algorithms, which were developed and experimentally verified by the speaker, will be discussed. These algorithms were based on intelligent decision-making elements along with an optimization process, and they aimed at enhancing the overall performance of the power system and mitigating the effect of heavy non-linear loads with variable intensity and duration.

Short Bio: Ahmed Mohamed is an assistant professor at the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department of the City University of New York (CUNY). He was a post-doctoral research fellow at the Energy Systems research Laboratory, Electrical and Computer Engineering Department, Florida International University, Miami, Florida. He also received his PhD degree from Florida International University in the Spring of 2013. He received his B.Sc. and M.Sc. degrees from the Electrical Engineering Department, College of Engineering, Minia University, Minia, Egypt in 2006 and 2009, respectively. His current research interests include Smart grids, Renewable Energy Systems, Hybrid AC/DC Power Systems and Shipboard Power Systems. He has published his work on these topics in several premier journals including IEEE Transactions on Smart Grid, IEEE Transactions on Sustainable Energy, and IEEE Transactions on Energy Conversion.Efficient and reliable techniques for power delivery and utilization are needed to account for the increased penetration of renewable energy sources in electric power systems. Such methods are also required for current and future demands of plug-in electric vehicles and high-demand power electronic loads. Distributed control and optimal power network architectures will lead to viable solutions to the energy management issue with a high level of reliability and security. This presentation aims at presenting and verifying new techniques for distributed control by deploying DC microgrids, involving distributed renewable generation and energy storage, through the operating AC power system.