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Archive for the ‘Awards’ Category

Call for 2015 Awards Nominations

Friday, September 19th, 2014

Nominations are being solicited for the Nanotechnology Council’s 2015 Awards.

Award categories are Early Career, Pioneer and Distinguished Service.

See the NTC Award Nominations page for full description and nomination form. Nominations are due by October 15.

 

 

2014 Awards Presentation

Friday, August 22nd, 2014

Toronto, Canada (21 August 2014) – The IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC) presented its 2014 awards at the 2014 International Nanotechnology Conference (NANO 2014) gala dinner held August 20 at the Eaton Chelsea Hotel.

The 2014 NTC Pioneer Award winner is Professor Stephen Y. Chou, the Joseph C. Elgin Professor of Engineering at Princeton University. The 2014 NTC Early Career Award winner is Mona Jarrahi, Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering at UCLA.

NTC Past-President Stephen Goodnick presented the Awards.

Professor Chou won the Pioneer Award “For seminal inventions, developments, and academic-industrial-impacts of new nanopatterning methods, especially nanoimprint; and new paradigm-shift electronic, optical, magnetic, biological nanodevices.”

Professor Chou is a prominent educator and researcher in nanotechnology and is widely recognized for developing a broad range of new nanofabrication methods. Key among this is his invention of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) in 1995. Professor Chou has received many awards for his work, and in 2007 he was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering.

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NTC Past-President Goodnick with Pioneer Award Winner Chou

Jarrahi won the Early Career Award “For contributions to the development of nano-plasmonic and nano-photonic devices and quantum well structures for advancement of terahertz technology.”

Professor Jarrahi has pioneered the use of plasmonic nanostructures inside of photoconductive terahertz devices, which has led to orders of magnitude enhancement in responsivity for applications including chemical sensing, security screening and medical imaging and diagnostics. Professor Jarrahi has received many Young Investigator awards, including the 2013 Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Award from the National Academy of Engineering.

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NTC Past-President Goodnick with Early Career Award Winner Jarrahi

 

2014 NTC Award Winners Announced

Friday, April 25th, 2014

The IEEE Nanotechnology Council Awards Committee has announced its 2014 award winners for the IEEE Nanotechnology Pioneer Award, and the IEEE NTC Early Career Award.   These awards will be presented at IEEE NANO 2014 in Toronto, Canada in August.

Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology

Stephen Y. Chou,
Joseph C. Elgin Professor of Engineering
Princeton University
chou@princeton.edu

“For seminal inventions, developments, and academic-industrial-impacts of new nanopatterning methods, especially nanoimprint; and new paradigm-shift electronic, optical, magnetic, biological nanodevices.”

Professor Chou is as prominent educator and researcher in nanotechnology and is widely recognized for developing a broad range of new nanofabrication methods. Key among this is his invention of nanoimprint lithography (NIL) in 1995. Professor Chou has received many awards for his work, and in 2007 he was inducted into the National Academy of Engineering.

Early Career Award in Nanotechnology

Mona Jarrahi
Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering
UCLA
mjarrahi@ee.ucla.edu

“For contributions to the development of nano-plasmonic and nano-photonic devices and quantum well structures for advancement of terahertz technology.”

Professor Jarrahi has pioneered the use of plasmonic nanostructures inside of photoconductive terahertz devices, which has led to orders of magnitude enhancement in responsivity for applications including chemical sensing, security screening and medical imaging and diagnostics. Professor Jarrahi has received many Young Investigator awards, including the 2013 Grainger Foundation Frontiers of Engineering Award from the National Academy of Engineering.

 

2013 Early Career Award Presented

Thursday, August 22nd, 2013

Beijing, China (8 August 2013) – The IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC) presented its 2013 awards at the 2013 International Nanotechnology Conference (NANO 2013) gala dinner held August 7 at the Shangi-La Hotel.

The 2013 NTC Pioneer Award winner is Professor Charles M. Lieber, the Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry in the Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology at Harvard University. The 2013 NTC Early Career Award winner is Professor Masahiro Nakajima of the Center for Micro-nano Mechatronics at Nagoya University in Japan.

NTC President Stephen Goodnick presented the Early Career Award to Professor Masahiro Nakajima. Professor Lieber was unable to attend and his award will be presented at a later time.

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NTC President Goodnick with awardee Masahiro Nakajima

Professor Nakajima won the Early Career Award “For achievements in bio-nanomanipulation systems.”

Dr. James Morris, NTC 2013 Awards Chair commented on the award: “Dr. Nakajima’s accomplishments in nanomanipulation have extended the capabilities of electron microscopy for the inspection of nanoscale artifacts of all kinds, including biological specimens at the cellular level. ”

Nakajima graduated from Shizuoka University in 2001, received the Master of Eng. degree from Nagoya University in 2003, and the Dr. Eng. degree from Nagoya University in 2006. He has been Assistant Professor of the Center for Micro-nano Mechatronics at Nagoya University since October 2009. His research interests are the applications of micro/nano-manipulation, nano-assembly, nano-fabrication, nano-devices, nano-mechanics, and nano-biology.

Dr. Nakajima’s awards include the Incentive Award of JSME Tokai (2007), Incentive Award of SICE Chubu (2008), two Best Paper Awards from the Micro-NanoMechatronics and Human Science Symposium (MHS) 2009 (2009), two Best Paper Awards in MHS 2010 (2010), ICRA 2011 Best Manipulation Paper Award (2011), Best Poster Award in MHS 2011 (2011), and Best Paper Award in MHS 2012 (2012).

 

2013 NTC Award Winners Announced

Wednesday, May 1st, 2013

The IEEE Nanotechnology Council Awards Committee has announced its 2013 award winners for the IEEE Nanotechnology Pioneer Award, and the IEEE NTC Early Career Award.   These awards will be presented at IEEE NANO 2013 in BEIJING, CHINA in August 2013.

  • Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology:

Charles M. Lieber
Mark Hyman Professor of Chemistry,
Department of Chemistry & Chemical Biology,
Harvard University, 12 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138

“For pioneering contributions to nanometer diameter wire synthesis and applications, and defining leadership in nanotechnology.”

  • Early Career Award in Nanotechnology:

Masahiro Nakajima
Center for Micro-nano Mechatronics,
Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8603 Japan

“For achievements in bio-nanomanipulation systems.”

Congratulations to Professors Lieber and Nakajima.

Call for Nominations for 2013 NTC Awards

Monday, August 27th, 2012

Nominations are being solicited for the Nanotechnology Council’S 2013 awards.

Nominations are due by OCTOBER 15, 2012.

See our Awards page for description, qualifications and nominations forms.

 

 

2012 Awards Presented

Thursday, August 23rd, 2012

Birmingham, UK (23 August 2012) – The IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC) presented its 2012 Awards at the 2012 International Nanotechnology Conference (NANO) gala dinner held August 22 at the University of Birmingham’s Great Hall.

NTC President Stephen Goodnick presented the Pioneer Award to Professor Joseph W. Lyding of the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, the Distinguished Service Award to Professor Ning Xi of Michigan State University, and the Early Career Award to Sayeef Salahuddin of the University of California at Berkeley.

Awardees Sayeef Salahuddin and Ning Xi; Stephen Goodnick (IEEE NTC President), Kyle Jiang (NANO 2012 Chair, University of Birmingham), and awardee Joseph Lyding

Professor Lyding received his award “For advances in atomic resolution nanofabrication and discovery of the giant deuterium isotope effect and its application to CMOS technology.” Lyding received his Ph.D. from Northwestern University in 1983. He is a professor in the University of Illinois  Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering and a full-time faculty member in the Nanoelectronics and Nanomaterials group. His fields of professional interest are scanning tunneling microscopy, nanofabrication, nanoelectronics, and IC chip reliability.

Dr. Lyding has received many honors: DARPA Excellent Performance Citation (1998); Philips Visiting Scholar, Haverford College (1998); University Scholar, UIUC (1997); Fellow of American Physical Society (1997); Associate, UIUC Center for Advanced Study (1996-97); IBM Partnership Award (1996-97); Fellow, UIUC Center for Advanced Study (1987-88); Arnold O. Beckman Award, UIUC (1988, 1985, 1984); Tau Beta Pi Outstanding Teaching Award (1984); ACS Arthur K. Doolittle Award (1983); IBM Postdoctoral Fellowship (1983).

Lyding’s research focus is on carbon nanoelectronics, based on carbon nanotubes and graphene for future semiconducting device applications and understanding their interactions with technological substrates at the atomistic level. This includes ultra-clean nanotube deposition and STM spectroscopic methodologies and modeling of subtle effects with first principles theory and simulations.

Professor Xi received his award “For dedicated and distinguished service to IEEE NTC as an Elected Officer”. Xi received his D.Sc. degree in Systems Science and Mathematics from Washington University in St. Louis, Missouri in December, 1993. He received his M.S. degree in Computer Science from Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, and the B.S. degree in Electrical Engineering from Beijing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics. Currently, he is the John D. Ryder Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Michigan State University.

Dr. Xi received the Best Paper Award in the IEEE/RSJ International Conference on Intelligent Robots and Systems in August, 1995. He also received the Best Paper Award in the 1998 Japan-USA Symposium on Flexible Automation. Dr. Xi was awarded the first Early Academic Career Award by the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society in May, 1999. In addition, he is also a recipient of National Science Foundation CAREER Award. He served as President of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council from 2010-2011, and prior to that President Elect and Vice President for Publications.

Xi’s research interests include robotics, manufacturing automation, micro/nano systems, and intelligent control and systems.

Professor Salahuddin received his award “For contributing to the understanding of the physics of hetero-interfaces in nanostructures and investigating their use for energy efficient applications”.  Salahuddin received his B.Sc. in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from BUET (Bangladesh University of Engineering and Technology) in 2003 and the Ph.D. in Electrical and Computer Engineering from Purdue University in 2007. He joined the faculty of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of California, Berkeley in 2008.

Dr. Salhuddin received the Kintarul Haque Gold Medal from BUET in 2003, the Meissner Fellowship from Purdue University, 2003-4, an IBM PhD Fellowship 2007-8, a MARCO/FCRP Inventor Recognition Award in 2007, a UC Regents Junior Faculty Fellowship in 2009, a Hellman Faculty Fellowship in 2010, a DOE NISE award in 2010, and the 2011 NSF CAREER award.

Salhuddin’s research interests are in the interdisciplinary field of electronic transport in nano structures, currently focusing on novel electronic and spintronic devices for low power logic and memory applications. Professor Salahuddin has championed the concept of using ‘interacting systems’ for switching, showing fundamental advantage of such systems over the conventional devices in terms of power dissipation.

2012 NTC Awards Announced

Tuesday, April 24th, 2012

The IEEE Nanotechnology Council (NTC) announces and congratulates the winners of our 2012 Awards approved at its February 2012 Executive Committee Meeting in Phoenix.

The awards and winners are:

Pioneer Award in Nanotechnology:

Joseph W. Lyding, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of Illinois

“For advances in atomic resolution nanofabrication and discovery of the giant deuterium isotope effect and its application to CMOS technology.”

Distinguished Service Award:

Ning Xi, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Michigan State University

“For dedicated and distinguished service to IEEE NTC as an Elected Officer”

Early Career Award in Nanotechnology:

Sayeef Salahuddin, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of California Berkeley

“For contributing to the understanding of the physics of hetero-interfaces in nanostructures and investigating their use for energy efficient applications”

The awards will be presented at the upcoming 12th International Conference on Nanotechnology 20-23 August 2012, in Birmingham England.