Reef Industries

Dragan Jovcic

jan-lecturer-1Dragan Jovcic obtained a Diploma Engineer degree in Control Engineering from the University of Belgrade, Serbia in 1993 and a Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Auckland, New Zealand in 1999. In the period 2000-2004 he was a lecturer at University of Ulster, UK. Since 2004 he has been with the University of Aberdeen, UK, where he is currently a professor. In 2008 he held a visiting professor post at McGill University, Canada. Prof Jovcic is a senior member of IEEE and IEEE PES Distinguished Lecturer. He is editor of IEEE Transactions on Power Delivery, and guest Editor in Chief of two special issues in IEEE transactions on power delivery and IET power electronics.

Professor Jovcic is a member of CIGRE, chairman of B4.76 and member of 3 other CIGRE working groups (B4.52, B4.58 and B4.64). He is founder and director of Aberdeen HVDC research centre. Prof Jovcic has around 120 publications and he is author of a book on HVDC: “High Voltage Direct Current Transmission: Converters, Systems and DC Grids”, Wiley, 2015.

His areas of expertise include: DC transmission grids, HVDC and FACTS.

Distinguished lecturer seminars

Prof Jovcic has been IEEE PES distinguished lecturer since July 2016, and he held his first distinguished lecturer seminar in Novi Sad, Serbia, sponsored by IEEE Serbia and Montenegro PES Chapter, on 13th September 2016. The seminar was titled: DC TRANSMISSION GRIDS: COMPONENTS, MODELLING, CONTROL AND PROTECTION CHALLENGES, and was attended by 30 engineers, researchers and students. There was great interest in the seminar which was followed by long questions and answers session.

IEEE PES Distinguished lecturer seminar, Novi Sad, September 2016. From left: Mr D. Kotur, Prof P. Stefanov, Prof Z. Radojevic, Prof D. Jovcic, Prof A. Saric.

IEEE PES Distinguished lecturer seminar, Novi Sad, September 2016. From left: Mr D. Kotur, Prof P. Stefanov, Prof Z. Radojevic, Prof D. Jovcic, Prof A. Saric.

 Seminar abstract

High Voltage DC Transmission has seen rapid technology advances in the last 20 years driven by the implementation of VSC (Voltage Source Converters) at MW and GW powers and in particular introduction of MMC (Modular Multilevel Converters). The development of interconnected DC transmission grids will require significant further advance from the existing point-to-point HVDC links, but it is widely believed that complex DC power grids can be built with comparable performance, reliability, flexibility and losses as traditional AC grids. The primary motivation for DC grid development is the need to interconnect multiple DC lines located in close proximity, and to enable power trading between many DC terminals, as an example in the proposed North Sea DC grid, or EU-wide overlay DC grid.