IEEE Schenectady Section

IEEE

Superconducting Synchronous Machines for Electric Ship Propulsion – June 13, 2019

IEEE Schenectady Section would like to invite you to a talk which outlines a notional design for a 36MW, 120r/min motor for ship propulsion

Please contact Supriya Tawde, at tawdessupriya@ieee.org by Wednesday, June 12th, 2019 to reserve. This event is free for IEEE members.  There is a $10 fee for non-members.

TOPIC:  Superconducting Synchronous Machines for Electric Ship Propulsion

ABSTRACT: The 36MW, 120r/min synchronous motor uses low temperature superconducting (LTS) field coils to create a 2.5T magnetic field in the air gap of the motor. Because of the high air gap magnetic field, an air core armature is designed. The space within the armature normally used for ferromagnetic teeth is used for insulation, cooling, and structure. The notional motor design exhibits high torque density (66Nm/kg) and high efficiency (99%). The LTS motor is enabled by thermosyphon technology developed for the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) systems used in the health care industry. A significant feature of the LTS motor is reduction in radial forces between the field and armature, representing a reduction by two orders of magnitude in the radial forces of a conventional motor. The LTS motor is compared against motors of comparable rating based on high temperature superconducting (HTS) technology. The LTS motor is substantially lighter, more compact, and far more cost effective

PRESENTED BY: Dr David Torrey

DATE and TIME: June 13th, 2019, Thursday, 12 to 1:00 PM

LOCATION: Niskayuna Reformed Church Room, 3041 Troy Schenectady Rd, Niskayuna, NY 12309

SPONSORED BY: IEEE Industry Applications Society, IEEE Schenectady Section

LUNCH: Lunch will be provided.

RESERVATIONS:

Please contact Supriya Tawde, at tawdessupriya@ieee.org by Wednesday, June 12th, 2019 to reserve. This event is free for IEEE members.  There is a $10 fee for non-members.

THE SPEAKER: Dr David Torrey is a Senior Principal Engineer within the electric machines team in the Electric Power organization at GE’s Research Center in Niskayuna, NY.  David received his Ph.D. in electrical engineering from MIT (Cambridge, MA, USA); he received his B.S. in electrical engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute (Worcester, MA, USA).  He has been with GE Global Research since 2012 advancing electric machine design for applications to Oil & Gas, Aviation, Appliances, Transportation, and Renewable Energy.  This work has involved reluctance, permanent magnet, induction, and superconducting machines and their associated controls.  Prior to joining GE Research, he was involved with a couple of start-up companies.  He has held faculty positions at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Worcester Polytechnic Institute.  He currently teaches as an adjunct faculty member at Clarkson University’s Capital Region Campus in Schenectady, NY.  He is a fellow of the IEEE and IET, and serves as an associated editor for the IET Proceedings on Electric Power Applications.

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