IEEE
August 14th, 2014

Prof. Radha Basu

Speaking on:

The Impact of Frugal Innovation on Emerging Markets through

Social Enterprises

radha-basu


 Speaker: Prof. Radha Basu, Director of the Frugal Innovation Lab at Santa Clara University

 VenueSanta Clara UniversityFrugal Innovation Lab
Frugal Innovation Lab is on the bottom floor of the Bannan Engineering Lab building

Map to: Santa Clara Univ. Frugal Innovation Lab with parking   

CostDonation basis: Thanks to Promex Industries in Santa Clara. In support of Innovation, they are providing the pizza for tonight’s event so that proceeds can go to future Humanitarian Technology projects.

Donation Basis, Suggestion: IEEE Members:$8; non-IEEE Members: $10; Retired Members & Students: $5

 

Click here for Eventbrite Registration 

Talk Summary: Prof. Basu will speak about Frugal Innovation Lab’s mission to develop accessible, affordable, adaptable, and appropriate technologies, products and solutions for emerging markets.

About the Speaker: Prof. Radha Basu   – Radha  has over 30 years experience in executive management. She is widely recognized as a leading woman entrepreneur in technology companies and as a pioneer in the Indian software business.

Radha held the position of Chairman & CEO of SupportSoft, a Nasdaq-listed company, from July 1999 to May 2006. She led the company through initial and secondary public offerings in 2000 and 2003, and built it into a worldwide market leader in support automation software. SupportSoft’s customers include General Electric, Cisco Systems, Bank of America, Comcast, British Telecom, BellSouth, Procter & Gamble, Verizon, IBM and Bharti Telecom. SupportSoft is today considered a leader in the activation of consumer broadband offerings.

Prior to SupportSoft, Radha spent 20 years at Hewlett Packard with her most recent position being Senior General Manager of the Electronic Business Software Organization, which she grew to a global $1.5 billion business.

Radha joined HP in 1978 as an R&D engineer in HP Laboratories, working in the field of ultrasound imaging. In 1983 she moved to Germany as European Sales & Marketing Manager of diagnostic medical products. In 1985 she set up HP’s Sales and R&D operations in India, including the India Software Operation, where she served as Managing Director. In 1989 Radha returned to the US to become General Manager of HP’s International Software Organization with responsibility for eight offshore software centers around the world. Radha has had significant impact on two groups during her career. First is the Indian software industry. In the mid-1980s she set up HP’s software center in Bangalore and the HP-TCS joint venture in Chennai. While today many high-tech companies have software subsidiaries or development groups in India, the HP India software operation with its first satellite data link was truly ground-breaking. Radha has also had strong influence on women in technology as a whole. In addition to blazing a trail for other women executives, she makes an effort to mentor young girls in science and woman professionals in the technology industry.

Radha was born and raised in Chennai. She holds a bachelors degree in Electronics & Communications from the University of Madras, a master’s degree in Computer Science from the University of Southern California, and is a graduate of the Stanford Executive Management program.

Radha has won numerous awards including Excelsior Leadership, Top25 Women of the Web, CEO of the Year 2000, Leader of the Millennium, and has been profiled in the Wall Street Journal, Business Week, Upside Magazine and Economic Times. She has featured as a guest speaker at Wharton School, MIT Sloan School, Stanford Business School, Santa Clara University, and the Forbes Executive Summit. She is currently serving as Entrepreneur-in-Residence at Simmons School of Management and on the boards of Interplast, MIT Global Climate Change Consortium, Center for Science Technology and Society and C.E.O. Women.

After retiring as CEO of SupportSoft, Radha and her husband Dipak created a global social enterprise, the Anudip Foundation. The goal of Anudip is to generate livelihoods for the unemployed and marginalized poor of India through rural centers for development of entrepreneurs and their empowerment with access to markets and capital. It is now a well established social enterprise in economic empowerment of youth and women. www.anudip.org

Need to drive: http://www.scu.edu/map/parking/directions.cfm

How about Caltrain? Santa Clara Station is right there!  http://www.caltrain.com/stations/santaclarastation.html

 

 

June 4th, 2014

Thomson-Nguyen

 Societal Change for Good Using Data Science

  With Thomson Nguyen of Framed Data

  Date and Time: Monday, June 9th at 6:30pm-8:30pm
  Registration, Pizza, Cookies & Drinks, Networking: starting at 6:30 PM 

  VenueLinkedIn Corporation:
             2025 Stierlin Ct Mountain View, CA 94043

Eventbrite   Click here for Eventbrite Registration 

Sponsor: IEEE SCV Young Professionals
Co-Sponsor:
IEEE-SCV-Special Interest group in Humanitarian Technology (SIGHT)

 

 

Abstract

The Harvard Business Review calls the modern Data Scientist “the Sexiest Job of the 21st Century.” The advent of a number of technologies, methods, and processes to filter, mine, and represent large amounts of data have given us the unique ability to intuit real insight from aggregate chaos. And yet, “the best minds of [our] generation are thinking about how to make people click ads.” Never has there ever been a more prudent time to use our abilities in machine learning and information processing to affect positive change in society. This talk will cover examples of men and women who use data science for good: in for-profit corporations that align corporate social responsibility with collective action  in non-profit organizations that seek to implement lasting technical and infrastructural solutions for municipal governments, and NGOs that use data to apply evidence-based policies to reach millennium development goals.

Speaker Bio

Thomson Nguyen is the co-founder and CEO at Framed Data, where he works on all kinds of data problems in analytics, infrastructure, and machine learning. He is also a visiting scholar at the Courant Institute for Mathematical Sciences at NYU, where his research interests lie in malicious malware behavior and parallelized decision trees. He is currently writing a book on common but useful data science recipes for startups, and is also re-learning Spanish (slowly). He studied Mathematics at the University of California, Berkeley, and Computational Biology at the University of Cambridge.

 

April 27th, 2014

GHTC-2014-Banner

IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference

The Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) is the flagship IEEE conference for presenting, discussing, and developing technological solutions to global humanitarian challenges. GHTC attracts presenters and attendees who work to meet the needs of populations affected by poverty, disaster, conflict, environmental change, and other impacts resulting in their needs being unmet or underserved. The technical focus of the Conference is complemented by an integrated understanding of broader contexts—economics, policy, culture, environment—to create and promote sustainable holistic solutions. GHTC welcomes participation by individuals and organizations from technical and non-technical backgrounds, including engineers, scientists, academics, small-businesses, corporations, philanthropists, foundations, and government and non-government organizations. The Conference theme of “Technology for the Benefit of Humanity” is presented in five tracks:

1. Energy: infrastructure and off-grid power, renewable, transportation, lighting, cooking & heating 2. Health: medical technology, telemedicine, mobile care, primary care 3. Disaster, connectivity, and communication: disaster warning & avoidance, disaster response, disaster management, networks, remote communication, communication technologies 4. Humanitarian challenges and opportunities: education, housing, supply chain & distribution, business development 5. Water and agriculture: clean water, sanitation, irrigation, farming practices & agricultural technologies

 

March 13th, 2014

Disaster Response Communications: What Works & What Doesn’t. Are you ready?

 

Date and Time: Thursday April 10, 2014 at 6-8pm

Registration, Networking, Pizza, Cookies & Drinks: 6-6:45 pmCatherine_Nelson  

Presentation: 6:45-7:45 pm

SpeakerCatherine Blackadar Nelson of Intel and GHTC

VenueSanta Clara UniversityFrugal Innovation Lab
Frugal Innovation Lab is on the bottom floor of the Bannan  Engineering Lab building

Map to: Santa Clara Univ. Frugal Innovation Lab with parking

Sponsor: IEEE SCV Special Interest Group for Humanitarian Technology (SIGHT)
Co-Sponsor: IEEE-SCV-WiE

Cost: $12 for IEEE members, $15 for Public, $5 for students, retirees, and unemployed

Eventbrite

Click here for Eventbrite Registration 

 

 

Talk Summary:  Learn about deploying mission critical networks for humanitarian and disaster response communications. The presentation will cover current challenges with disaster communications. It will showcase the different types of technologies used from networks, to radio, voice, video and  social media as well as best practices and pitfalls. There will be real case examples from Haiti, Katrina, Sandy and others. The presentation will also cover factors beyond technology that need to be addressed in order to be effective.

About the Speaker: Catherine Blackadar Nelson is an expert in security, Internet technologies, and communications and is currently a Sr. Security Researcher at Intel.  She is also an advisor to multiple organizations, including the UN, USAID and FEMA providing guidance in Cyber security, disaster and remote communications. In addition, Catherine is involved in the development of the Rapid Technology Assessment Team Initiative launched out of the US Naval Post Graduate School, which provides communications assessments in disasters to the humanitarian community.  Her past experience includes being instrumental in building the Cisco TacOps Disaster Response Team which specialized in disaster/mobile communications, and technology solutions for austere environments. In her career, she has over 20 years’ experience in disaster response and has been involved in responses to Hurricane Katrina, the Haitian earthquake, and the Japan 2011 earthquake/tsunami.

Believing in giving back, she is the current Chair of the IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference – which specializes in bringing together technologists from all over the world to share best practices. She is a member of the Anita Borg Institute’s NetHope Women’s TechConnect Mentor program.

Contact information: catherine.nelson@ieee.org | twitter:@CathBNelson

Need to drive -Parking garage is next to the Bannan Engineering Buildings:  http://www.scu.edu/map/parking/directions.cfm

How about Caltrain? Santa Clara Station is right there!  http://www.caltrain.com/stations/santaclarastation.html

February 9th, 2014

IEEE Global Humanitarian Technology Conference
Call for Papers

Updated:  Abstracts Due April 7, 2014
http://www.ieeeghtc.org/

The Global Humanitarian Technology Conference (GHTC) is the flagship IEEE conference for presenting,
discussing, and developing technological solutions to global humanitarian challenges. GHTC attracts
presenters and attendees who work to meet the needs of populations affected by poverty, disaster,
conflict, environmental change, and other impacts resulting in their needs being unmet or underserved.
The technical focus of the Conference is complemented by an integrated understanding of broader
contexts—economics, policy, culture, environment—to create and promote sustainable holistic solutions.
GHTC welcomes participation by individuals and organizations from technical and non-technical
backgrounds, including engineers, scientists, academics, small-businesses, corporations, philanthropists,
foundations, and government and non-government organizations.
The Conference theme of “Technology for the Benefit of Humanity” is presented in five tracks:

1. Energy: infrastructure and off-grid power, renewable, transportation, lighting, cooking & heating
2. Health: medical technology, telemedicine, mobile care, primary care
3. Disaster, connectivity, and communication: disaster warning & avoidance, disaster response,
disaster management, networks, remote communication, communication technologies
4. Humanitarian challenges and opportunities: education, housing, supply chain & distribution,
business development
5. Water and agriculture: clean water, sanitation, irrigation, farming practices & agricultural
technologies

Submission Schedule: Authors may submit content in the form of a technical paper, a lightning talk, a poster, or a special session such as a panel or workshop. All submissions require an abstract, draft, and final submission.Key dates include:

March 31 Abstract submission
May 27 Draft submission for review
July 18 Final submission for review
August 21 Final revised submission (if required)

More information on sessions, submission requirements and deadlines, registration for the conference,
hotel reservations and exhibiting is available on the GHTC website www.ieeeghtc.org. Please note:

  • At least one author of the submission must attend and present at the Conference
  • All submissions must be posted online at www.ieeeghtc.org/author-central
  • All submissions must follow content & length guidelines available at www.ieeeghtc.org/author-central
  •  Necessary revisions must be completed before final acceptance
  • Notification of acceptance or rejection will be sent via email
  • International attendees are responsible for obtaining the proper Visas

Accepted papers will be published and included in IEEE Xplore. Accepted presentations will be posted on the GHTC website with the author’s consent. Electronic media containing all accepted GHTC abstracts and papers will be distributed to registered attendees.

February 9th, 2014

Santa Clara University ACM and ACM-W student groups are hosting a Hackathon that is meant to make a difference.

Creative Apps can, if put in the hands of those who need it, can help to find shelter, food or medical care. Do you love to code? Are you up for the challenge? If so, check out this link for SCU’s Hackathon on February 27th!

http://acm.engr.scu.edu/hack/index.html