SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

TITLE: Metrology in Nanotechnology

SPEAKER:
Dr. Min Yang, Director of Applications Development at Bruker Nano Surfaces

min-yang-headshot

Tuesday, October 18th, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

We are now in a very exciting period of time when many new and destructive technologies emerge across a wide range of industries, making the existing technologies obsolete faster than anyone could anticipate. The new products with emerging technologies are generally smaller, lighter, stronger, more reliable and cheaper. To achieve all these, process control has becoming more important than ever, which gives good opportunities for various metrology tools to be incorporated into the advanced manufacturing processes. This leads to new challenges to integrate the metrology tools into the manufacturing tools. In this talk, I will review and compare several metrology tools and their applications in nanotechnology, and discuss about some of the challenges in integrating the tools into the manufacturing process.

min-yang-graphic

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Dr. Min Yang joined Bruker Nano Surfaces as Director of Applications Development, responsible for developing new applications for tribology, optical and stylus metrology, and optical coordinate measurement. Min has over 20 years of experience in tribology, metrology and failure analysis, mostly in the data storage business in Silicon Valley. She started her career as a tribology integration engineer for head/disk interface designs and held a number of positions at IBM and Western Digital in tribology and failure analysis. Prior joining Bruker, Min was an Engineering Director at Western Digital, responsible for the development of tribology and failure analysis testing on a wide variety of instruments including, SEM/EDX, AFM, FIB, TOF-SIMS, FTIR, Raman, optical analysis tools, and test chambers. Min holds a BSEE from Beijing University of Technology, a Masters in Materials Science from Beijing Aeronautical Materials Institute, and both a Masters in Mechanical Engineering and a PhD in System Engineering from UC San Diego.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.


TITLE: Electronic, Thermal, and Unconventional Applications of 1D and 2D Materials

SPEAKER:
Prof. Eric Pop, Stanford University, Electrical Engineering

EricPop_Headshot

Tuesday, September 20th, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

One-dimensional (1D) materials like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and two-dimensional (2D) materials like graphene have potential applications in low-power electronics and energy-conversion systems. These are also rich domains for fundamental discoveries as well as technological advances. This talk will present recent highlights from our research on CNTs, graphene, and MoS2. As an example, we used CNTs to enable the most energy-efficient phase-change memory (PCM) devices to date. We have also studied graphene from basic transport measurements, to the recent wafer-scale demonstration of analog dot product nanofunctions. We are presently evaluating the unusual thermal and thermoelectric properties of other 2D materials (like MoS2) which could lead to unconventional applications in energy harvesters and thermal circuits. Our studies ultimately reveal fundamental limits and new applications that could be achieved through the co-design and heterogeneous integration of 1D and 2D nanomaterials. For more info please visit http://poplab.stanford.edu.

EricPop_Graphic

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Eric Pop (epop@stanford.edu) is an Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering (EE) at Stanford, where he leads the SystemX Heterogeneous Integration Focus Area. He was previously on the faculty of the University of Illinois Urbana- Champaign (2007-13) and worked at Intel (2005-07). His research interests are at the intersection of electronics, nanomaterials, and energy. He received his PhD in EE from Stanford (2005) and three degrees from MIT (MEng and BS in EE, BS in Physics). His honors include the 2010 PECASE from the White House, and Young Investigator Awards from the ONR, NSF CAREER, AFOSR, and DARPA. He is an IEEE Senior member, he served as the General Chair of the Device Research Conference (DRC), and on program committees of the VLSI, IRPS, MRS, IEDM, and APS conferences. In a past life, he was a DJ at KZSU 90.1 from 2001-04.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.


TITLE: There’s pleProf. Tsu-Jae King Liunty of room at the Bottom- and at the Top

SPEAKER:
Prof. Tsu-Jae King Liu
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences
University of California, Berkeley

Tuesday, August 16th, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

The virtuous cycle of integrated-circuit (IC) technology advancement has been sustained for over 50 years, resulting in the proliferation of information and communication technology with dramatic economic and social impact. Industry experts predict that the pace of increasing transistor density will slow down dramatically within the next 5 years, however, due to fundamental limits of the conventional photolithographic patterningprocess. Scaling of IC feature sizes beyond the resolution limit of lithography has been enabled by multiple-patterning techniques, but at significant incremental cost. In the first part of this seminar, I will describe a more cost-efficient approach for defining sub-lithographic features, to help extend the era of Moore’s Law.

TsuJaeLu_Device_Schematic             TsuJaeLu_Device_SEM

 
Beyond Moore’s Law,the proliferation of mobile electronic devices and the emergence of applications such as wireless sensor networks and the Internet of Things have brought energy consumption to the fore of challenges for future information-processing devices. The energy efficiency of a digital logic integrated circuit is fundamentally limited by non-zero transistor off-state leakage current. Mechanical switches have zero leakage current and potentially can overcome this fundamental limit. In the second part of this seminar, I will describe recent progress toward realizing the promise of ultra-low-power mechanical computing.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Tsu-Jae King Liu received the B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical Engineering from Stanford University. From 1992 to 1996 she was a Member of Research Staff at the Xerox Palo Alto Research Center (Palo Alto, CA). In August 1996 she joined the faculty of the University of California, Berkeley, where she currently holds the TSMC Distinguished Professorship in Microelectronics in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences and serves as Associate Dean for Academic Planning and Development in the College of Engineering.

Dr. Liu’s research awards include the DARPA Significant Technical Achievement Award (2000) for development of the FinFET, the IEEE Kiyo Tomiyasu Award (2010) for contributions to nanoscale MOS transistors, memory devices, and MEMs devices, the Intel Outstanding Researcher in Nanotechnology Award (2012), and the Semiconductor Industry Association Outstanding Research Award (2014). She has authored or co-authored close to 500 publications and holds over 90 U.S. patents, and is a Fellow of the IEEE. Her research activities are presently in advanced materials, process technology and devices for energy-efficient electronics.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.


TITLE: Towards lab-on-a-chip for milk adulteration detection

SPEAKER: Viktor Shkolnikov, HP Labs


Viktor Shkolnikov

 

Tuesday, July 19st, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

Economic adulteration of milk is a serious issue that has caused illness in 0.3 million people in 2008 alone. This is made possible by the fact that milk quality is assessed solely on its nitrogen content. Currently only a small amount of milk is checked for adulteration as small molecule adulterants are detected via HPLC-MS and GC-MS systems in centralized laboratories, at significant cost in terms of resources, time, and product useful shelf-life. Thus portable, field-deployable systems are strongly needed for detection of milk adulteration. This talk will focus on directions and challenges of designing such systems and using nano-structures for performing sensing from real samples such as milk. The talk will also discuss efforts at HP Labs to enable such sensing via a nano structured surface enhanced Raman sensor (SERS).

Shkolnikov nano fingers

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Dr. Viktor Shkolnikov is a researcher at HP Labs, where he leads several microfluidics for life sciences projects. His research interests include experimental fluid dynamics and transport phenomena (especially micro/nano-fluidics), electrokinetics and electrohydrodynamics, microscale cooling, Lab-on-a-Chip and drug delivery devices, and fluid mechanics as applied to health care and life sciences. Viktor Shkolnikov received his Ph.D., M.S., and B.S. all in Mechanical Engineering and all from Stanford University.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.


TITLE: Transforming Nanodevices to Nanosystems

SPEAKER: Max M. Shulaker, Stanford University

Dr.Max M. Shulaker

Tuesday, June 21st, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

The computing demands of future data-intensive applications far exceed the capabilities of today’s electronics, and cannot be met by isolated improvements in transistor technologies or integrated circuit (IC) architectures alone. Transformative nanosystems, which leverage the unique properties of emerging nanotechnologies to create new IC architectures, are required to deliver unprecedented performance and energy efficiency. However, emerging nanomaterials and nanodevices suffer from significant imperfections and variations. Thus, realizing working circuits, let alone transformative nanosystems, has been infeasible.

As a case-study for realizing nanosystems, I will present my work on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs), a leading candidate for energy-efficient and high-performance digital systems. Unfortunately, substantial imperfections and variations inherent to carbon nanotubes (CNTs), combined with low current densities, restricted demonstrations to stand-alone transistors or logic gates, with severely limited performance, yield, and scalability. I will describe techniques to overcome these major challenges through a combination of new CNT process techniques and CNFET circuit design solutions. This imperfection-immune paradigm transforms CNTs from solely a scientifically-interesting material into working nanosystems such as the first microprocessor [Nature 2013] and the first digital sub-systems [ISSCC 2013, JSSC 2014, ACS Nano 2014] built entirely using CNFETs. These are the first system-level demonstrations among promising emerging nanotechnologies for high-performance and highly energy-efficient digital systems. This approach also enables high-performance CNFETs with the highest current-drive to-date (which are, for the first time, competitive with comparably-sized silicon-based transistors from commercial foundries [IEDM 2014]). All of the fabrication and design techniques are VLSI-compatible, and can be applied to arbitrary technology nodes; to illustrate, I will describe recent results from a 14 nm-node CNFET [IEDM 2015].

talk_image_Shulaker_CNT

Beyond specific CNT technologies, I will also present my work on building new architectures to achieve high degrees of energy efficiency for emerging data-intensive applications. Such new architectures are naturally enabled by a range of beyond-silicon emerging nanotechnologies (including CNTs). I will demonstrate the first monolithically-integrated three-dimensional (3D) nanosystem architectures [VLSI Tech. 2014, IEDM 2014] with vertically-integrated layers of logic, memory, and sensing circuits. These include the largest nanosystem yet fabricated using beyond-silicon emerging nanotechnologies, with over 2 million CNFETs and over 1 million Resistive Random Access Memory (RRAM) cells, all integrated vertically over a conventional silicon substrate with over 1 million silicon transistors (all fabricated at the Stanford Nanofabrication Facility). With dense and fine-grained connectivity between sensing, storage and computation, such nanosystems can capture terabytes of data from the outside world every second, and produce “processed information” by performing in-situ classification of the sensor data using on-chip accelerators designed using CNFET logic.

I will conclude by giving my vision for how the ubiquitous computing technology that is critical for meeting society’s challenges in the 21st century can be realized by harnessing the capabilities of multiple nanomaterials and nanodevices in complex nanosystems.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Max Shulaker will be joining MIT in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science as a faculty member, having finished his PhD in Electrical Engineering at Stanford University under the supervision of Professor Subhasish Mitra and co-advised by Professor Philip Wong. He received his B.S. from Stanford University in Electrical Engineering. Max’s current research interests are in the broad area of nanosystems. His research results include the demonstration of the first carbon nanotube computer (highlighted on the cover of Nature, Sept. 2013), the first digital sub-systems built entirely using carbon nanotube FETs (awarded the ISSCC Jack Raper Award for Outstanding Technology-Directions Paper, 2013), the first monolithically-integrated 3D integrated circuits combining arbitrary vertical stacking of logic and memory (IEDM 2014), the highest-performance CNFETs to-date (IEDM 2014), and the first highly-scaled CNFETs fabricated in a VLSI-compatible manner (IEDM 2015). He was a Fannie and John Hertz Fellow and a Stanford Graduate Fellow.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.


IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council Chapter 12th Annual Full Day Symposium

“Nanotechnology in Biosystems, Medicine and Health”

May 17, 2016 8:30AM – 5:45 PM

Texas Instruments Conference Center, Bldg. E-1, 2900 Semiconductor Drive, Santa Clara, CA map

Register here

Nanomedicine in the 21st Century

Prof. Folarin Erogbogbo, Biomedical Engineering, San Jose State University, and Conference Chair

Building micro/nano interfaces to cells and organisms

Prof. Michel M. Maharbiz, Electrical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

Nanoscale devices as smart biomaterials for surface-cell interactions

Prof. Nicolas A. Melosh, Materials Science, Stanford University

Nanoweave – Proprietary Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

Mr. Greg King, CEO, Fibralign

Cancer Nanotechnology : Opportunities and Challenges

Prof. Demir Akin, Deputy Director, Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Stanford University

Enabling Safe, Effective and Non-Viral Genetic Nanomedicine

Mr. Andre Watson, Founder, Ligandal

Nanodiamonds for sentinel lymph node mapping

Dr. Ambika Bumb, CEO and Founder, Bikanta

Nanodiamonds for Neuroimaging

Prof. Abraham Wolcott, Physical Chemistry, San Jose State University

Theranostic nanoparticles

Prof. Zhen Cheng, Director of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Lab, Stanford School of Medicine

Also: Student Poster Sessions and Networking

Register here

Sponsors

        http://www.7men.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/IBM-banner.jpg               emblogo


TITLE: Materials Studies of New High Efficiency Perovskite Solar Absorbers

SPEAKER: Dr. Mike Toney, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory & Stanford UniversityDr.Mike Toney

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

Cosponsored by IEEE Santa Clara Valley Photovoltaic Section and IEEE Santa Clara Valley Photonics Society

ABSTRACT:

Organic-inorganic halide perovskite films (e.g., methylammonium lead iodide  xrd3 or CH3NH3PbI3) were first employed as light absorbing layers in photovoltaic (PV) devices in 2009, and produced relatively modest power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 3.8%.Since then, the development of perovskite solar cells has been meteoric, with PCEs increasing from 3.8% to over 21% in just over five years.

The combination of high extinction coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and compatibility with low cost, solution-based fabrication processes gives these materials enormous commercial potential.

A significant appeal of CH3NH3PbI3 is their facile synthesis using solution processes. Typically a low temperature anneal (about 100 °C) is involved in film synthesis with subsequent cooling through the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition near 65 °C. Since the transition temperature is within the range expected in real world device applications, it is therefore important to understand the structural behavior at this transition and its impact on the device performance.

In order to better understand this phase transition in CH3NH3PbI3 thin films, we have developed the capability for operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction by designing a sample stage for simultaneous, temperature dependent measurement of J-V curves and diffraction. This has allowed us to obtain X-ray diffraction data during the operation of CH3NH3PbI3 devices.

 Here I will present detailed structural characterization of the perovskite crystal structure with increasing temperature, including the tetragonal lattice distortion, octahedral rotations associated with the room temperature tetragonal phase, and thermal (disorder) parameters. The impact of these structural changes on the device J-V characteristics will be described and we comment on potential implications for material and device properties.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Michael Toney is head of the Materials Sciences Division and a distinguished staff scientist at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), part of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He is a pioneer in the use of X-ray diffraction and small angle scattering for the determination of molecular and mesoscale structure of organic and polymeric thin films and for the determination of atomic structure of electrode-electrolyte interfaces. Toney received his BS from Caltech in 1979 and his PhD from the University of Washington in 1983, both in physics. He spend one year as a postdoc at the Risoe National Lab (now DTU) in Denmark, where he participated in some of the first surface X-ray diffraction experiments. He then began working at IBM Almaden Research in materials sciences. He left IBM in 2003 to join SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford, where he starting programs in sustainable energy materials.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.


Tuesday, March 15th, 2016 Mamin enhanced 11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

TITLE: Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging- the Quest for a Molecular Structure Microscope
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SPEAKER: Dr. John Mamin, IBM

Cosponsored by the Santa Clara Valley Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
ABSTRACT:
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has had a huge impact in the biomedical field, with its ability to image the body non-destructively in three dimensions. A number of groups around the world are working to develop nanoMRI, applying the principles of MRI to perform three dimensional microscopy, with the ultimate goal of imaging individual biological molecules such as protein. Because nuclear magnetism is such a weak effect, any such technique will require a magnetic sensor that is both extremely sensitive and nanometer scale. In the past our group has used ultrasensitive force detection to sense the minute forces (~10-18 N) between a magnetic tip and small ensembles of hydrogen nuclei. More recently, we have explored the use of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond as quantum magnetometers for detecting nuclear magnetic resonance. I will describe both recent progress and the considerable challenges that lay ahead.

 

Mamin abstract enhanced

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
John Mamin graduated from Stanford with a B.S. in physics and did his Ph.D. and postdoc in physics at UC Berkeley, working in superconductivity and the then emerging field of scanning tunneling microscopy. He has been a Research Staff Member at IBM ever since, working in areas ranging from magnetic force microscopy to probe- based data storage to pushing the limits of force detection. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and co-recipient of the 2009 Cozzarelli and the 2011 Gunther Laukien Prize for work in nanoscale magnetic resonance.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.



Tom Albrecht PSTuesday, February 16, 2016 

11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE. Please register here.

TITLE: Nanoscale Chemical Imaging with Photo-induced Force Microscopy
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SPEAKER: Dr. Tom Albrecht, Molecular Vista, Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Infrared Photo-induced Force Microscopy (IR PiFM) is based on an atomic force microscopy (AFM) platform that is coupled to a widely tunable mid-IR laser.  PiFM measures the dipole induced at or near the surface of a sample by an excitation light source by detecting the dipole-dipole force that exists between the induced dipole in the sample and the mirror image dipole in the metallic AFM tip.  This interaction is strongly affected by the optical absorption spectrum of the sample, thereby providing a significant spectral contrast mechanism which can be used to differentiate between chemical species.  Due to its AFM heritage, PiFM acquires both the topography and spectral images concurrently and naturally provides information on the relationship between local chemistry and topology.  Due to the steep dipole-dipole force dependence on the tip-sample gap distance, PiFM spectral images have spatial resolution approaching  the topographic resolution of AFM,  demonstrating sub 10 nm spatial resolution on a variety of samples.

The capabilities of PiFM are highlighted by studies on various self-assembled block copolymer systems.  The results consist of PiFM spectral images associated with several absorption bands of different polymeric blocks along with broad spectra associated with nano-spots on sample surfaces.   Images of fingerprint patterns and parallel lamellae (prepared via directed self-assembly) for both poly (styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) and poly (styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) show clear spectral contrast between the two blocks of each material system.  For poly (styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine), PiFM contrast between blocks was far greater than is generally available by scanning electron microscopy without staining.  By enabling imaging at the nm-scale with chemical specificity, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials and facilitating technological applications of such materials.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Thomas Albrecht received a B.A. in physics from Carleton College in 1985 and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University in 1989.  His thesis work on atomic force microscopy (AFM) included the first microfabricated cantilevers for AFM and the first demonstration of atomic resolution by AFM.  After completing graduate school, Tom worked briefly for Park Scientific Instruments to transfer the fabrication process for microcantilevers and to help develop Park’s first AFM product.

In 1989, Tom joined the IBM Almaden Research Center (San Jose, CA) where his contributions included frequency modulation detection for AFM, and a variety of contributions to magnetic recording technology, such as a track following servo system that became the industry standard for tape drives, load/unload technology for disk drives, and the “Microdrive” – a tiny 1-inch drive that was used in consumer electronics devices such as the Apple iPod Mini.  From 2002 to 2004, Tom worked on assignment at the IBM Zurich Research lab (Switzerland), where he contributed to and briefly managed the “Millipede” micromechanical data storage project.

In 2004, Tom joined Hitachi Global Storage Technologies (HGST, San Jose) where he led the company’s patterned media research team for 10 years.  The patterned media project involved an ambitious combination of nanofabrication technologies, including e-beam, self-assembly, double patterning, and nanoimprint lithography.  In 2013, he was named an HGST Fellow for lifetime contributions to the magnetic data storage industry.

In 2015, Tom joined Molecular Vista (San Jose) to bring to market a promising new technology combining AFM with optical spectroscopy to provide chemical imaging with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

Tom has 148 issued U.S. patents and numerous publications.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

Please register here.
Also, visit our Meetup Group.


Anne SakdinawatTuesday, January 19, 2016 
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE. Please register here.

 

TITLE: Imaging at Very Short Wavelengths Using Nanotechnology

 

SPEAKER: Dr. Anne Sakdinawat, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

 

ABSTRACT:
The field of X-ray imaging has not only contributed to a wide range of basic sciences, but also many industries, such as medical imaging, non-destructive testing, and security. Due to the ability to image through thick objects with high resolution and in some cases, with elemental identification and femtosecond time resolution, x-ray imaging in biological, chemical, and physical sciences is a very powerful tool. Examples of this include tomography of whole unstained cells, in-situ nanoscale imaging of battery components with elemental specificity, and imaging of magnetic domains. While sophisticated x-ray instrumentation has been developed for use with synchrotron radiation, translation to lab-based use still remains a challenge. A major goal in x-ray imaging is to be able to develop new lab-based technologies with improved imaging capabilities that currently exist at synchrotrons.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Anne Sakdinawat is currently a scientist at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory where she serves as a group leader in x-ray optics and imaging. Her research interests include the development of new x-ray imaging, optics, nanofabrication techniques and translational research for biomedical and materials applications. She received her doctorate in bioengineering from the University of California at Berkeley and San Francisco and has received the Werner Meyer-Ilse Award for Excellence in X-ray Microscopy and the Department of Energy Early Career Award.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

Please register here.
Also, visit our Meetup Group.