SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Tuesday, September 15, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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Please RSVP here.

 

 

TITLE: Emerging Non-volatile Memory, enabled by Carbon Nano-materials

SPEAKER: Dr. Ethan C. Ahn, Dept of Electrical Engineering, Stanford Nanoelectronics Lab
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
With the advent of so-called ‘big data’ era and the increasing need for greater storage capacity in various mobile and wearable devices, it is becoming more important to explore a new storage-class memory technology. As illustrated in recent research articles and papers, significant progress on emerging non-volatile memory (NVM) devices such as spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM), resistive or metal-oxide RAM (RRAM), or phase-change memory (PCM), made it possible to replace the mainstream NVM (NAND Flash) and even reach certain on-chip memory requirements (e.g., L2/L3 SRAM cache). This is important, as the energy efficiency of computing circuits/systems has been increasingly limited by the memory and storage devices. In this talk, a frontier research on the near- and long- term potential of emerging nanoscale memory devices and architectures will be discussed to replace ultimately scaled CMOS memory device technologies. The emerging 1TnR (one-transistor-n-resistors) array architecture with carbon nanotube field-effect transistor as one-dimensional selection device and thus reduced sneak leakage is demonstrated as a cost-effective and 3D-stackable solution. The integrated bipolar RRAM device, for example, exhibits self-compliance characteristics with high endurance and fast switching speed. It is pointed out that the carbon nanotube electrode brings the (lithography-free) critical dimension of the memory device down to a single-digit-nanometer. The novel thermal engineering technique for low-power NVM applications is also introduced using a monolayer graphene as an interfacial thermal barrier. The programming (RESET) current of the graphene-inserted PCM device is reduced by about 40% due to an improved thermal efficiency. The status, key challenges, and promising applications of the RRAM, PCM, and STT-MRAM technologies will be briefly discussed in the talk.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Ahn received the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (EE) at Stanford University in 2015, working under the supervision of Professor H.-S. Philip Wong. He joined Stanford University in 2010, after a 3-year research career on Spintronic devices (STT-MRAM) with the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) in Seoul, Korea. While at KIST, he initiated the collaborative research program with Michigan State University to study spin-dependent transports in magnetic multilayers and spinvalves. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in EE from the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in Daejeon, Korea. He is the author of over 10 peer-reviewed research journal papers in electrical engineering and applied physics, over 20 premier international conference papers, and one book chapter of Emerging Nanoelectronic Devices (ed. A. Chen, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Jan. 2015). His primary research interests include emerging non-volatile memory devices and architectures (including Metal-oxide RAM and Phase-Change Memory), beyond CMOS electronics (utilizing Carbon Nano-materials such as Carbon Nanotube and graphene), and various spintronic devices (including STT-MRAM and Spin-FET). Dr. Ahn has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including John Bardeen Student Research Award for Excellence in Nanodevice Research (2014), Best Summer Research Intern Award by T.-C. Chen at IBM T. J. Watson (2013), and GE Scholarships (2004).

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 

Please RSVP here to make sure we have enough lunch.


Tuesday, August 18, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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Please RSVP here.

 

 

TITLE: Electrostatic Functionalization of Carbon Based Nanomaterials
and Applications in Chemical, Gas and BioSensing

SPEAKER: Dr. Vasuda Bhatia, Professor, Amity Institute
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanomaterials based sensors have attracted a great deal
of research interest in last several years. Their unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties make them
very strong candidates for the development of the new generation of miniaturized, lowpower and highperformance
sensors. In this talk, I present a novel technology based on electrostatic charging for the functionalization of carbon based nanomaterials. The electrostatically functionalized surfaces provide oxygenated functional groups as anchoring sites for decoration with several nanoparticles to synthesize nanocarbon nanoparticles composites. Using selfassembled thermal embedding technique, thin films have been fabricated for the detection of chemical molecules as well as enzyme free detection of biomolecules.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Vasuda Bhatia is a professor at Amity Institute of Renewable and Alternative Energy and Amity Institute of Advanced Research and Studies, Amity University, India. She received her B.Tech. (Bachelors of Technology) in Materials and Metallurgical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur, India in 1995, MS in Materials Science from the University of Cincinnati in 1997 and the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University in 2001. She was research scientist at Stellar Micro Devices, Austin, Texas; visiting faculty at IIT
Kanpur, India and research associate at Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore, India. Her research interests include synthesis, characterization and device applications of nanomaterials; materials for renewable energy applications; field emission devices and materials and development of sensors and sensing devices for bio, chemical and gas applications.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 

Please RSVP here to make sure we have enough lunch.


Tuesday July 21, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: Interactions of Light and Charge with Nanoporous MetalOrganic
Frameworks

SPEAKER: Dr. Mark Allendorf, Senior Scientist, Sandia National Laboratories
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
MetalOrganic Frameworks (MOFs) are a recently created class of supramolecular materials in which metal ions are coordinated to rigid organic “linker” molecules, creating a nanoporous structure with an exceptional degree of synthetic versatility. The length scales in these materials make them appealing for a variety of optoelectronic applications. However, virtually all known MOFs are insulators as a result of the largely ionic nature of the metallinker bonds, which severely limits their use in other types of electronic devices. Recently, we demonstrated a route to MOFs that become electrically conducting by introducing guest molecules into their pores (Guest@MOF). This presentation will discuss the transport of energy and charge within MOFs, illustrated by examples from our research on chemical sensing, radiation detection, light harvesting, thermoelectrics, and device fabrication. Our results suggest that Guest@MOF represents a novel class of electronic materials with the potential to bridge the properties gap between inorganic and organic conductors, providing a high degree of electronic tailorability combined with longrange order for high charge mobility.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Mark D. Allendorf is a Senior Scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California and holds degrees in chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis (A.B.) and Stanford (Ph.D.). At Sandia, he leads efforts to develop the fundamental science and applications of metalorganic frameworks (MOFs) and related materials. Current research interests include chemical sensing, gas storage and separations, MOFs for electronic devices, and catalysts for biofuels production. His work has lead to over 170 publications. He is President Emeritus and Fellow of The Electrochemical Society and has received multiple awards for research, leadership, and teamwork, including a 2014 R&D100 Award for a novel approach to radiation detection.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 


Tuesday June 16, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: An introduction to the 3D Subnanometer Compositionally Sensitive Technique of Atom Probe Tomography

SPEAKER: Mr. Robert Ulfig, LEAP Product Manager, Cameca SAS
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
An introduction to the 3D subnanometer compositionally sensitive technique of atom probe tomography (using the Local Electrode Atom Probe – LEAP), especially how it has been used in semiconductor applications such as silicides, shHigh-k dielectrics, Si/SiGe[B], compound semiconductors, 3D device structures, and optoelectronics. The latest techniques to target single devices with novel sample preparation techniques will be highlighted as well as the advantages for yield and data quality of the latest instrumentation, the LEAP 5000X. Time will be reserved for discussion and the potential of the technique for specific semiconductor applications.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Robert M. Ulfig joined CAMECA Instruments Inc. (Previously Imago Scientific Instruments) in 2001 after working at Advanced Micro Device’s Submicron Development Center in Sunnyvale California where he worked as a Senior Process Engineer in the Lithography and Thin Films Groups. He completed his MS in Materials Science and Engineering in 1997 where his research projects included development of a plasma source ion implantation system for semiconductor research, including work with Oak Ridge National Labs investigating implanted silicon with Atom Probe Tomography.

At CAMECA Rob initially developed the manufacturing process for the local electrode for the Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) systems. He also developed key sample preparation procedures, including Microtip coupons and an automated electropolishing system. During his time at CAMECA, he has worked as the Applications Lab Manager, Technical Sales Engineer, and now works as the LEAP Product Manager where he oversees the customer training program, works to develop new applications with customers, and integrates the activities and requests from customers into the latest and greatest of CAMECA software and hardware.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 


IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council Chapter 11th Annual Full Day Symposium

“The Promise and Progress of Nanophotonics”

An International Year of Light event co-sponsored by IEEE SCV Photonics and EDS Chapters

May 19, 2015 8:30AM – 4:30PM

Texas Instruments Auditorium, Santa Clara CA map

 

Nanophotonics relates to nanostructures and materials which facilitate the generation, propagation, manipulation, and detection of light. This symposium will showcase the breadth of the exciting work being done in the Bay Area and beyond to reveal the promise of uniquely nanotechnology-enabled effects. It will also provide a forum for networking and exchange of information among local academics, engineers, early-stage venture capitalists and entrepreneurs who are moving nanophotonics into disruptive applications.
 

Silicon Photonics at Intel
– Dr. Andrew Alduino, Director, Silicon-Photonics Product Line Management, Intel Corporation
 
Silicon Photonics and the Datacenter

– Dr. Marco Fiorentino, Researcher, System Research Lab, HP Labs
 
Semiconductor Nanowire Nanophotonics and Optoelectronics
– Dr. Mark Brongersma, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
 
Carbon Nanotube Infrared and Terahertz Photodetectors
– Dr. François Léonard, Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore
 
Visualizing Chemical Reactions and Light-Matter Interactions with Nanometer-scale Resolution
– Dr. Jen Dionne, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
 
Mapping Optoelectronic Processes at the Native Length Scale in Organic & Inorganic Nano Composites
– Dr. Alexander Weber-Bargioni, Staff Scientist, Molecular Foundry Material Science Division LBNL
 
Quantum Noise in All-Optical Logic Circuits
– Dr. Charles Santori, Researcher, HP Labs
 
Nanoscale Optofluidics: On-Chip Infectious Disease and Cancer Diagnostics
– Dr. Ahmet Ali Yanik, Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz
 
Implement Smell and Taste with Nano-sensors
– Dr. Zhiyong Li, Principal Scientist, Foundational Technology Lab at HP Labs
 
Poster Presentations: work by students from local colleges and universities

Lunch and coffee/tea breaks are included.

On-line registration by May 16: https://www.123signup.com/register?id=yrskj
Fees:
   $20 Students with ID
   $30 Life Member/Between employment
   $40 Member
   $50 Non-member

>> Add $10 if you prefer pay-at-event attendance.
Please pre-register for pay-at-event attendance:


Tuesday April 21, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

 

 

TITLE: Nanoengineered Devices for Thermal Management and Solar Thermal Energy Conversion

SPEAKER: Dr. Evelyn N. Wang, Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, MIT

ABSTRACT:
Nanoengineered surfaces offer new possibilities to manipulate fluidic and thermal transport processes for a variety of applications including lab-on-a-chip, thermal management, and energy conversion systems. In this talk, I will first discuss how nanoengineered surfaces can be used to control wetting and bubble/droplet behavior for high flux heat dissipation of electronics. These surfaces can enhance both boiling and condensation heat transfer in two-phase pumped cooling systems. In the second half of the talk, I will discuss the opportunities with nanoengineered surfaces to increase efficiency in solar thermophotovoltaic (STPV) devices. The use of such surfaces allows us to engineer the spectral properties and to define the active area of the emitter with respect to the absorber. These studies provide insights into the complex physical processes underlying heat-structure interactions and offer a path to achieving increased efficiency in next generation thermal management and energy devices.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Evelyn N. Wang is an Associate Professor in the Mechanical Engineering Department at MIT. She received her BS from MIT in 2000 and MS and PhD from Stanford University in 2001, and 2006, respectively. From 2006-2007, she was a postdoctoral researcher at Bell Laboratories, Alcatel-Lucent. Her research interests include fundamental studies of micro/nanoscale heat and mass transport and the development of efficient thermal management, water desalination, and solar thermal energy systems. Her work has been honored with awards including the 2008 DARPA Young Faculty Award, the 2011 Air Force Office of Scientific Research Young Investigator Award, the 2012 Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, the 2012 ASME Bergles-Rohsenow Young Investigator Award in Heat Transfer, as well as best paper awards at 2010 and 2014 ITherm and 2012 ASME Micro and Nanoscale Heat and Mass Transfer International Conference.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 


Dr. Kayte FischerTuesday March 17, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: Harnessing Nano for Drug Delivery

SPEAKER: Dr. Kayte Fischer, CTO, Nano Precision Medical Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Nanoscale biomaterial interactions differ significantly from micro and macroscale interactions, enabling a variety of new technologies to address drug delivery challenges. This presentation will focus on nanoscale biological interactions and nano drug delivery technologies (apart from nanoparticles) in the larger drug delivery context. We will direct particular attention to the technology and history of Nano Precision Medical, a small startup in Emeryville that is utilizing titania nanoporous membrane technology to control the rate of drug delivery over the course of months.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Since founding Nano Precision Medical, Dr. Kayte Fischer has been the Chief Technology Officer, coordinating technical development and scientific research with a larger strategic vision for the company.

Kayte completed her Ph.D. in the Therapeutic Micro and Nanotechnology Laboratory at the UC San Francisco/UC Berkeley Joint Graduate Group in Bioengineering, Class of 2010. Her award-winning research focused on novel adhesive properties of nanostructured materials in the context of gastrointestinal drug delivery. During her time in graduate school, Kayte completed the Management of Technology program through the Haas School of Business and the College of Engineering. She also has a designated emphasis in Nanoscale Science and Engineering and served as the president of the Berkeley Nanotechnology Club. Prior to attending graduate school, Kayte graduated with honors from the California Institute of Technology with a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering. She has research experience in a variety of areas, from nanoscale biological interactions to biofluid mechanics and robotics.

Nano Precision Medical is developing a small, implantable device to improve treatment for people suffering from chronic diseases by providing sustained medication levels over several months without the need for injections.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

Presentation:
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Don GardnerTuesday February 17, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

 

 

 

TITLE: Integrated On-Chip Energy Storage Using Nano Porous-Silicon Electrochemical Capacitors

SPEAKER: Donald. S. Gardner, Principal Engineer, Intel Corp. and IEEE Fellow

ABSTRACT:
Capacitors are favored over batteries for many energy storage applications as well as suitable to work in synergy with batteries and energy harvesting devices because they can capture energy at high rates and lower voltages, as well as provide higher power. They also don’t degrade significantly over thousands of charging cycles. These properties follow because capacitors are electrostatic devices and do not rely on chemical reactions to store energy, as batteries do. Intel researchers built and studied electrochemical (EC) capacitors based on porous-silicon (P-Si) nanostructures coated with various atomic layer deposited (ALD) films. The devices were fabricated with conventional silicon technology, opening up the potential to integrate them on a single die with silicon CMOS circuits, sensors, or energy-harvesting systems like silicon solar cells. The talk will detail how they optimized the porous-silicon nanostructure and the surface-coating processes. Some of the porous-silicon electrochemical capacitors they built that had a TiN coating, exhibited stable capacitance even after 1,000 cycles at 50 mV/sec and with an energy density one to three orders of magnitude higher than electrolytic capacitors. A short video clip demonstrating a device with 1.2 Farads of capacitance on a 100mm silicon wafer will be shown.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Donald Gardner is currently a Principal Engineer at Intel. From 2001 until the present he created and co-developed high-frequency voltage converters that are in current use in the latest Intel “Haswell” microprocessors. He also created inductor structures using magnetic materials that met the needs of power delivery and RF circuit applications and resulted in the world’s first fully integrated voltage regulator. In addition he conceived and codeveloped electrochemical capacitor technology for energy storage. From 1991 to 2001 he invented embedded MIM capacitor structures as well as a reflow copper deposition technology.

Donald is a named inventor on 90 patents and has published 160+ electrical engineering and materials science papers in journals and conferences. He is a visiting scholar at Stanford University where he received his PhD in Electrical Engineering. He is an IEEE Fellow.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 


Ross_KozarskyTuesday January 20, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

 

 

TITLE: What’s Hot in Advanced Nanomaterials

SPEAKER: Ross Kozarsky, Senior Analyst, Lux Research Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Coating, composite, and metal technologies enhance the performance of today’s products, while emerging platform technologies like graphene, 3D printing, and metamaterials advance the frontier of tomorrow’s material capabilities. However, even the most remarkable materials won’t generate profits without properly crafted and informed strategies. This presentation will draw on years of Lux Research company profiles and analysis to try to answer questions like “What’s hot in advanced materials? and “When can we make money?” We’ll review key factors like the changing average momentum, technical value, and partnership scores of technology developers, in order to position various advanced materials technology families along their hype cycle and commercial trajectories, and identify leading innovators for potential collaboration opportunities.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Ross Kozarsky is a Senior Analyst who leads Lux Research’s Advanced Materials team. Ross’ primary responsibilities include providing strategic advice and on-going intelligence for emerging coating, composite, metal, and platform materials that serve as enabling technologies for new markets and applications in industries ranging from oil and gas to electronics. He has advised a wide array of entities from large multinational corporations to investment firms to government agencies on strategic innovation decisions in domains such as transportation lightweighting, energy security, and nanotechnology. Beyond his research engagements, Ross has presented at conferences in Asia, Europe, and North America on topics ranging from carbon fiber composites to 3D printing.

Prior to joining Lux Research, Ross worked as a chemical engineer at the Silicon Valley solar startup Solexant, developing flexible thin film photovoltaic cells using printable nanomaterial technologies.
Ross holds a Master’s degree in Advanced Chemical Engineering from the University of Cambridge and a B.S.E in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University, with certificates in Materials Science and Finance. He has research experience on a wide range of topics including photovoltaic device fabrication and characterization, thin film deposition and processing, sol-gel nanomaterial synthesis, piezoelectric sensors, microfluidic devices, and the electrochemical detection of hydrogen. Ross’ ongoing education includes extension courses at University of California (Berkeley) in Financial Accounting and Princeton University alumni courses on healthcare reform and America’s post-recession economy.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10

 


Join us for our 10th Annual Half Day Fall Symposium on Energy Storage

Tuesday Nov 18,2014
12:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Agenda:

12:15 Registration Begins
 
12:30 Networking and Lunch
 
1:00 Welcome and Introductions
 
1:10 Fueling the future: Safe, Dense, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Hybrid Nanomaterials
Dr. Jeff Urban

Staff Scientist, Materials Science Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Historical trends have shown gradual decarbonization of our fuel sources over hundreds of years, the ultimate endpoint of which is hydrogen. Hydrogen fuel cell applications offer safe, emissions-free energy and all of the major auto manufacturers have made commitments to the technology. However, despite this technological push, there remain fundamental scientific issues that have delayed widespread adoption of the technology. In this talk, I’ll discuss ongoing work in my group to develop hybrid nanomaterials approaches to safe, energy-dense, and reversible hydrogen storage in metallic Magnesium nanocrystals, with a focus on new work on 2D hybrid materials. This talk will specifically highlight new work which advances these materials toward room-temperature storage and the atomic limit of selective encapsulation.

1:45 Fuel Cell Mobile Lighting: A Hydrogen Technology Market Transformation Project
Dr. Lennie Klebanoff

Sandia National Laboratory

I report the results of a project aimed to introduce proton exchange membrane (PEM) hydrogen fuel-cell technology into aviation ground support equipment (GSE) and rental construction equipment. The purpose of the project was to design, build, field-test and then commercialize fuel-cell equipment to start the process of displacing diesel fuel use in aviation GSE and in mobile construction equipment, and to reduce GHG emissions. I describe a hydrogen fuel cell mobile lighting tower (H2LT) that combines hydrogen stored as a high pressure gas, PEM fuel cell technology, and advanced lighting into a single unit with uses in aviation and construction. Results from the field tests are discussed. The H2LT system is compared directly to a comparable diesel-fueled light tower with regard to size, performance and emissions.

2:20 Extending Battery Storage Now with Silicon and Software
Dania Ghantous

VP Technology, Qnovo
Extending Battery Storage Now with Silicon and Software

Lithium ion batteries have come a long way since they were first commercialized. The improvements in performance are based on materials innovation, design and optimization of the manufacturing process. However, with the ever increasing demands from consumer and automotive applications, lithium ion batteries are still lacking in performance. This presentation will provide an overview of the status and challenges of lithium ion batteries and introduce the audience to Qnovo’s unique approach to improving battery performance.

2:55 Networking & Break
 
3:10 Impact of Nano- and Meso-structure on the Performance of Capacitors
Dr. Michael Stadermann

Staff Scientist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

The morphology of supercapacitor electrodes can significantly affect their performance. The dimensions of pores on the nanoscale has been shown to affect the capacitance per area, while the dimensions of pores on the mesoscale can affects mass transport and power density. In this presentation, I will discuss modeling and experimental results on how pore dimensions can give rise to increased capacitance, and how altering of mesoscale pore dimensions by compressing the electrode affects energy and power density. Finally, I will show how hierarchical pore structures improve performance of capacitive desalination devices.

3:45 Monolithic Carbon Nanotube Electrodes: Technology and Energy Storage Applications
Dr. Phil Kraus

CEO Ultora

Ultora has developed a proprietary method to grow carbon nanotubes directly from a metal foil, providing a means of producing flexible, monolithic CNT electrodes in a single processing step. The novel growth method results in excellent adhesion and electrical contact between the CNTs and the metal foil. Ultora’s CNT electrodes comprise only materials – CNTs and metal foil – that are stable at high temperatures. When paired with ionic liquid electrolytes, supercapacitorsare made that are operable at very high temperatures – more than twice the typical maximum operating temperature of commercial supercapacitors. Applications of Ultora’s monolithic CNT-on-foil material,where low mass and thermal stability are important include: harsh environments, thermal interface materials, electromagnetic shielding, infrared absorption materials, and catalyst substrates.

4:20 He says fool’s cells, I say fuel cells
Dr. John Suh

Executive Director Hyundai Ventures
A CEO of a Silicon Valley car company has been vocal that he is not a fan of fuel cells. In fact he refers to them as fool’s cells. There remains significant technological and economic obstacles to make a fuel cell vehicle that is competitive to ICE vehicles. But then again, any alternative fuel vehicle has competitive disadvantages to ICEs. Hyundai Ventures is Hyundai Motor Groups corporate venturing arm in the US. We believe that exponential technologies of all types have the potential to make all cars more energy efficient and sustainable, including battery electric and fuel cell (hydrogen) cars. This talk will provide examples of startups with technologies that are using effects on the micro or nanoscale to enable more eco-friendly transportation.
4:55 Symposium concludes