SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Entrepreneurial Paths – Not Just Nanotech

Co-sponsors: IEEE Consumer Electronics Society , IEEE Technology and Engineering Management Society

Presentations, Panel Discussion, Q&A
Register: Here

Tuesday, November 14, 2017 – 12:45 PM to 4:45 PM
Cost: $10 – discounts for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed

Location: Texas Instruments Building E Conference Center
2900 Semiconductor Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95052
See the TI Building location map and directions

Programme:

12:45               Registration

  1:00               Welcome

                             Glenn Friedman, Chair, SFBA Nanotechnology Council

                             KRS Murthy, Event Chair, ExCom member, SFBA Nanotechnology Council

  1:10               Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Building Successful Companies

                             Dr. Srinivas Rao, President & CEO, Senova Systems;

                             Operating Partner, Phoenix Venture Partners

  1:45               Protecting Your Nanotech

                             Steven A. Swernofsky, Patent Attorney; Managing Director Los Altos Law

  2:20               Break

  2:30               SBIR Funds: A Startup’s Oasis in the Valley of Death

                             Spenser Hamilton, Business Advisor;

                             San Mateo Small Business Development Center

  3:05               Federal SBIRs as Vehicles for Small Businesses

                             Ryszard Pisarski, NASA Ames Research Center

                             Geetha R Dholakia, REI Systems, NASA Ames Research Center

  3:40               Panel Discussion – to include presenters and also:

                             Dr. Radoslav Danilak, CEO of Tachyum

                             Mr. Kameshwar Eranki, Founder & CEO of VajraSoft Inc.

  4:30               Networking: Attendees, Presenters, Panelists

  5:00               End

 

Abstracts & Biographies:

Innovation, Entrepreneurship, Building Successful Companies

     Dr. Srinivas Rao is an industry leader with a distinguished track record of material science technology development and commercialization. Until recently, he was Vice President of Corporate Technology at Flextronics International, Ltd. (NASDAQ: FLEX), a multi-billion dollar, global provider of vertically integrated advanced design and electronics manufacturing services. Earlier in his career, he was Vice President of Technology at Solectron Corporation, where he was responsible for engineering and product development, helping grow the company from $190 million to $22 billion in revenues and from one site to over 70 sites worldwide. Previously, Dr. Rao was a Senior Scientist at Raychem Corporation and held technology management and research positions at Eastman Kodak Research Laboratories and RCA Laboratories, where he received RCA’s Outstanding Achievement Award. Dr. Rao is a Distinguished Alumnus of Indian Institute of Technology Madras where he earned a B.Tech degree in Metallurgical Engineering, and an MS and PhD in Metallurgy and Materials Science from the Stevens Institute of Technology. He holds numerous patents and is the author of numerous papers and review chapters. He has also held distinguished positions in several technical organizations, including Chair of the Editorial Committee of Surface Mount Technology, Chair of the Electronic Materials Committee at the American Society for Metals, and Chair of the Electronic Manufacturing Services of IEEE’s CPMT. He has also served on the editorial board of the International Society for Hybrid Microelectronics, Future Circuits International, the International Review of Circuit Board Manufacturing Technology, and, in 2005, served on the Blue Ribbon Task Force on Nanotechnology for the State of California.

 

Protecting Your Nanotech

Nanotechnology is a rapidly growing field where legal protection can be key. In this presentation we will answer important questions like: what is the law that applies to new ideas? Who owns them? What value do they have? What can you do with them? Both startups and established companies have a serious interest in the care and protection of new ideas. How is it done? How do we know when we’ve done something patentable?

     Steven A. Swernofsky is a patent attorney with over 25 years experience obtaining and litigating patents. He focuses on maximizing the value clients obtain for their legal dollars. This includes advising on how to best protect new ideas, growing and managing patent portfolios, advising on litigation, and licensing intellectual property. He is Managing Director at Los Altos Law, which regularly teams with inventors and in-house legal departments, as well as key executives, investors, and other litigation counsel, to protect intellectual property and promote business interests. His patents have been successfully sued on by major companies for millions of dollars.

Mr. Swernofsky earned a BS from MIT, where he studied electrical engineering and computer science, with emphasis on computer networking, security, and artificial intelligence. He worked at MITRE and BBN in those fields before he attended law school at UCLA. His practice has led him to a wide range of high technology fields, including artificial intelligence and machine learning, augmented and virtual reality, bioinformatics and computations chemistry, wired and wireless computer networking, analog and digital circuit design, microprocessor design, semiconductor design and manufacturing, medical devices and instruments, and robotics. He is also enrolled as an arbitrator with FINRA.

 

SBIR Funds: A Startup’s Oasis in the Valley of Death

Many early-stage companies face a significant funding gap when trying to develop new technology, from the translational research to the proof of concept. This funding gap is sometimes referred to as the “valley of death”, a reflection of the vast number of companies that are unable to raise the needed capital to progress towards commercialization. The suggestion behind the “valley of death” phrase is that companies that should be able to attract investment do not get funded, because the technical risks inherent in technology development are high. Ultimately, the valley of death reflects the perceived imbalance of risk and reward for an investment at this stage as well as the resulting difficulty for a technology company of harder sciences in raising capital during this time. In an effort to bridge the gap, the Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program encourages domestic small businesses to engage in Federal Research/Research and Development (R/R&D) that has the potential for commercialization. Through a competitive awards-based program, SBIR enables small businesses to explore their technological potential and provides the incentive to profit from its commercialization. By including qualified small businesses in the nation’s R&D arena, high-tech innovation is stimulated, and the United States gains entrepreneurial spirit as it meets its specific research and development needs. The mission of the SBIR program is to support scientific excellence and technological innovation through the investment of Federal research funds in critical American priorities to build a strong national economy.

     Spenser Hamilton has expertise in areas including valuation, business strategy, operations efficiency, market research and new product development. He has advised or invested in companies with technologies ranging from mobile devices, clean tech, healthcare IT, and medical devices. Spencer’s prior work experience includes clinical settings, investment funds, and Corporate America. He holds a BA and an MBA from the University of Southern California and Johns Hopkins University, respectively. In addition, he has lectured on entrepreneurship, innovation, and R&D funding at forums and colleges in US and abroad.

 

NASA SBIR STTR Program

The Federal SBIR/STTR program is called the nation’s seed fund for entrepreneurs. The talk will focus on NASA’s contribution to the SBIR/STTR program. This will include the details of how the program is implemented at NASA, a description of how the technologies flow into NASA’s programs and will highlight some success stories from the program.

     Dr. Ryszard Pisarski is the SBIR/STTR Technology Infusion Manager for the NASA SBIR/STTR program management office. In this capacity he co-ordinates with all ten NASA centers and facilitates activities that lead to infusion of SBIR/STTR technology into NASA programs. Dr. Pisarski obtained his Ph.D. in Astrophysics from Columbia University in 1984 and his MBA from the Stern School of Business at NYU in 1999. He worked at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center developing flight and data analysis software for the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) and was a project manager for a joint US/German/UK astrophysics mission – ROSAT.  Dr. Pisarski was a branch head for the Astrophysical Data Facility at GSFC, responsible for managing a group of scientists developing software and analysis techniques for various astrophysics flight missions. In 2000 Dr. Pisarski moved to NASA Ames’s Research Center and worked in partnerships prior to the SBIR/STTR program management office.

 

Federal SBIRs as Vehicles for Small Businesses

The talk will focus on the NASA SBIR program, the technical and logistical planning required to submit a good proposal and some examples of successful nanotechnology awards.

     Geetha R Dholakia, REI Systems Inc. and NASA Ames Research Center, works at the NASA Ames SBIR/STTR program management office as the technology transfer specialist. She received a PhD in condensed matter physics from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, India. She has performed research in electronic transport in the nanoscale, soft condensed matter and nanomaterials synthesis at NASA Ames Research Center. She also has extensive experience in physics based instrumentation for scanning microscopy, miniaturization of instruments for NASA on-board planetary missions and in nanosatellite trade studies. Prior to joining the NASA SBIR program, she worked as a technology consultant with SmallTech Consulting and later in technical business development for the NASA Ames partnerships office.

 


TALK:  Semiconductor Nanowires for Optoelectronic and Energy Applications

Co-sponsor: IEEE Photonics Society

SPEAKER:

Professor Hoe Tan

Department of Electronic Materials Engineering, Research School of Physics and Engineering
The Australian National University

Monday, November 20, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  PM

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

The excitement of nanowire research is due to the unique electronic and optical properties of these nanostructures. Both axial and radial heterostructure nanowires have been proposed as nano-building blocks for the next generation devices, which are expected to revolutionise our technological world. Unique properties stem from nanowires’ large surface area-to-volume ratio, very high aspect ratio, and carrier and photon confinement in two dimensions. These nanowires are usually grown by the so-called vapor-liquid-solid mechanism, which relies on a metal nanoparticle to catalyze and seed the growth. An alternative technique to grow the nanowires is by selective area growth technique, where a dielectric mask is first patterned on the substrate prior to growth.

In this talk, I will present an overview of compound semiconductor nanowire research activities at The Australian National University. The optical and structural properties of binary and ternary III-V nanowires including GaAs, InGaAs, InP and GaAsSb nanowires grown by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy will be presented. Various issues such as tapering of the nanowires, compositional non-uniformity along nanowires, crystal structure, carrier lifetime and polarization effect will be discussed.

I will also present our results of III-V nanowires grown on Si substrates which are of great interests for the integration of nano-optoelectronic devices on Si platforms. Our results of enhancing the quantum efficiency of nanowires by using plasmonics are promising to improve the performance of nanowire devices.

Finally, the results from our nanowire lasers, photodetectors, solar cells and photoelectrodes for water splitting will be presented.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Prof. Tan is currently the Head of the Department of Electronic Materials Engineering at the Research School of Physics and Engineering, The Australian National University. Tan received his B.E. (Hons) in Electrical Engineering from the University of Melbourne in 1992, after which he worked with Osram in Malaysia as a quality assurance engineer. In 1997, he was awarded the PhD degree from the Australian National University for his dissertation on “Ion beam effects in GaAs-AlGaAs materials and devices”. He is a past recipient of the Australian Research Council Postdoctoral, QEII and Future Fellowships. He has published/co-published over 350 journal papers, including four book chapters. He is also a co-inventor in 4 US patents related to laser diodes and infrared photodetectors. His research interests include epitaxial growth of low-dimensional compound semiconductors, nanostructured optoelectronic devices and ion-implantation processing of compound semiconductors for optoelectronic device applications. Prof. Tan is a Senior Member of the IEEE and is the Distinguished Lecturer for IEEE Nanotechnology Council (2016) and IEEE Photonics Society (2016-2017).

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjournment
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

 


TALK: Triboelectric Nanogenerator for NASA Mars Mission, Space Manufacturing & Next Generation Mechanical Energy Harvesting

SPEAKER:

Myeong-Lok Seol

Research Scientist, NASA

Tuesday, October 17, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  PM

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

Demand for mobile power sources is increasing with the growth of wireless sensor network, mobile healthcare devices, and internet-of-things (IoT). Currently, most applications use a battery as the sole power source, but all the batteries have a limited lifetime and require costly replacement and recharging, limiting the application area. Energy harvesting is a process that converts various types of ambient energy sources into electrical energy. By implementing energy harvesters, small-electronic systems can extend lifetime, reduce maintenance cost, and become more sustainable. Triboelectric nanogenerator is a mechanical energy harvester based on triboelectricity created at the contact interface between two different materials. Triboelectric nanogenerators are light in weight, generate high output power, require low material and manufacturing costs, and have a strong development potential.

In this talk, the background and fundamental principles of the triboelectric nanogenerator will be introduced. In addition, recent research progress of triboelectric nanogenerators for interplanetary missions in NASA will be presented.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Myeong-Lok Seol is a Research Scientist at NASA Ames Research Center. His research interests include energy harvesting, nanotechnology-enabled electronics and sensors, functional nanostructures and nanomaterials. Currently, he is developing a triboelectric nanogenerator for interplanetary missions and all-printed energy harvester for autonomous manufacturing in space. He received his B.S. degree in 2010 and his Ph.D. degree in 2016 from Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Korea. He has published 55 international journals, 7 international conferences, and 8 patents.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjournment
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

 


Company Origin Stories – Exploring Entrepreneurship
Nanotech company founders explain how and why they started their enterprises
Register: Here

Tues Sept 19 – 5:30 PM to 9:15 PM
Cost: $17 – includes dinner – discounts for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed

Location: Texas Instruments Building E Conference Center
2900 Semiconductor Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95052
See the TI Building location map and directions

Presenting Companies include:

View Dynamic Glass – Architectural “smart glass” using electrochromism from nano-scale layers of metal oxides. Raised $650M and has completed installation at several hundred sites. Read More

Nano Precision Medical – Subdermal implants using nano-structured membranes to provide long-term therapeutics for the treatment of chronic diseases. Read More

 

Fibralign – Biomedical devices based on artificial nano-structured collagen. Read More


TITLE: 2D Materials Advantages and Challenges Towards Applications

SPEAKER:

Ching-Hua (Fiona) Wang, PhD. Student

Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University

Tuesday, August 15, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

Two-dimensional (2D) materials present unique opportunities for next generation ultra-thin electronics. However, practical 2D devices can only be realized after overcoming key challenges: contact resistance, stable doping, and uniform growth.
In this talk I will highlight the recent research our group has implemented to improve contact and doping in BP and MoS2 transistors.   I will then show our work beyond transistor applications using 2D materials, such as graphene-Cu interconnects and hBN-RRAM, that are promising for three-dimensional integrated electronics.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

TITLE: Giving Optical Vision to Nanorobots

SPEAKER: Dr. Wen J. Li

Chair Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Dept. of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering

City University of Hong Kong

Friday, July 21, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

The resolution of optical microscopes has been constrained by Ernst Abbe’s limit of diffraction to 200–250nm under visible light illumination since the 17th Century. The invention of the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) about 80 years ago and Scanning Tunneling Microscope/Atomic Force Microscope (STM/AFM) about 35 years have made tremendous breakthroughs in observing and analyzing sub-diffraction scale features. Although non-optical technologies such as the SEM can provide resolution much beyond the optical diffraction limit, they are still mostly not compatible with real-time and non-destructive imaging (especially for biological samples) requirements, and therefore, a non-invasive and non-destructive imaging technology that can break the diffraction limit is still in demand.

In this lecture, we will present a novel time-efficient and non-invasive microsphere-based scanning superlens microscopy (SSUM) method that enables the observation of biological and non-bioligical samples over a large area with sub-diffraction limited resolution.  This technology operates in both non-invasive and contact modes with approximately 200 times the acquisition efficiency of atomic force microscopy. Our method marks a path to visible light based non-invasive nanoscale resolution with foreseeable applications in integrated circuit defect detection and bio-molecular imaging.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

    Wen J. Li (BSc/MSc, Univ. of Southern California, and PhD, UCLA) is Chair Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the Dept. of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering of the City University of Hong Kong (CityU).  He is currently the President of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council and Director of the Institute for Intelligent Cyber Physical Sensing Systems of the Shenzhen Academy of Robotics, China. Prior to joining CityU, Dr. Li was with The Chinese University of Hong Kong (1997-2011), where he headed the Centre for Micro and Nano Systems. He held research positions at the NASA/CalTech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (1995-1997) and The Aerospace Corporation (1989-1995) before moving to Hong Kong in 1997.

Dr. Li’s team has published more than 300 technical papers related to MEMS, nanotechnology, and robotics; the team has received best conference/student paper awards from well-known conferences such as IEEE-ICRA, IEEE/ASME AIM, IEEE-ROBIO, and IEEE-NANO in the past 15 years.

Dr. Li served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine (2007 to 2013) and is an Editorial Board Member of Scientific Reports.   Dr. Li was elected IEEE Fellow in 2010 and ASME Fellow in 2011, and was a Distinguished Overseas Scholar of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.  He also held/holds honorary academic positions at the Shenyang Institute of Automation, Peking University, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, and Soochow University.

Dr. Li’s current research interest includes super-resolution nanoscopy, cyber physical sensors, and micro/nano robotics for biomedical applications.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

TITLE:  Engineering Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion

SPEAKER: Dr. Xiaolin Zheng, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University

Tuesday, June 20, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

 

 

ABSTRACT:

Nanomaterials are broadly studied and used in renewable energy and sustainability-focused science and technology. And yet, a key challenge is to develop scalable and economic synthetic routes for the mass production of nanomaterials. In this talk, I will present a new pathway of using flame as a scalable reactor to synthesis binary, ternary, doped and branched metal oxide nanowires with controlled physical morphology and chemical compositions. I will also report a combined solution-flame method that combines flame synthesis with sol-gel chemistry to modify existing nanomaterials with coatings, doping, reduction and oxidation. These new flame synthesis routes exhibit the unique advantages of self-purification process, ultrafast growth rate, atmospheric and continuous operation. These flame-synthesized nanomaterials are of high quality and when they are applied as key elements in photoelectrochemical (or solar) water-splitting devices that has led to the best performance to date. Finally, I will discuss a peel-and-stick method for manufacturing flexible and light weight thin film solar cells that could enable the attachment of solar cells to virtually any surface, ranging from existing building walls and windows, car roofs, light poles, backpacks and paper to portable electronics, significantly broadening the applications of solar cells.

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Xiaolin Zheng is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, she did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Her research interests include flame synthesis of nanomaterials and their applications in solar energy conversion, and developing manufacturing methods for flexible electronic devices. She is a member of MRS, ACS and the Combustion Institute. Her research has been honored with awards including the Resonant Energy Award from Caltech (2016), Nano Letters Young Investigator Lectureship (2015), MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Award from 3M (2013), Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from the White House (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008) and DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

For additional information: http://www.stanford.edu/group/zheng

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council Chapter 13th Annual Full Day Symposium

“Nanotechnology in : The Environment, Advanced Batteries, Clean Energy”

May 16, 2017 8:30AM – 4:30 PM

SEMI Global Headquarters, 673 South Milpitas Boulevard, Milpitas, CA 95035

Register here

This symposium brings together leading academic, government and industry experts to discuss the innovation opportunities and technical challenges associated with the deployment of nanotechnology in the  above areas. Presentation Topics and Speakers include:

Nano Material Toxicity

Marie-Noele Croteau, USGS

Regulating Nano Toxicity

Jeffrey Wong, California Environmental Protection Agency

Hydrogen Storage

Jen Dionne, Stanford University

Carbon Dioxide Capture

Robert Aines, Livermore

Nanostructured, Bio-Derived Materials for Next-Generation Li-ion Batteries

Brennan Campbell, NexTech Batteries && Robert Ionescu, HP Labs

Carbon Nanotube Batteries for Solar Grid Storage & Electric Vehicles

John Wong, CTO, Magi Scitech

Job Seeker assistance will be available at this event, including a table with CVs and resumes available for people to pick up and an “Announcement Slide” which will be projected during the initial networking portion of the day. Job seekers, please bring your resumes to display on said table, send a one line description to be displayed on the “Announcement Slide” to SFBA.Nano.Jobs@gmail.com by May 14.

Register here

 Sponsors Include:


TITLE: Fully Inkjet-Printed RRAM Memory Circuits for Solution-Processed Electronics

SPEAKER: Jeremy Smith, PhD., U.C. Berkeley

Tuesday, April 18, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

Inkjet printing provides a convenient, digital, additive manufacturing process to demonstrate the compatibility of solution-processed electronic materials suitable for flexible electronics, roll-to-roll processing, and large-area electronics.

This study also highlights some of the challenges of controlling film formation, nanoparticle ink development, and materials interactions in a realistic situation. I will discuss the use of sol-gel oxides and metal nanoparticle inks in a 3D printer for fabricating novel transistors and RRAM memory devices. In particular, using fully printed thin-film transistors (TFT),

I have studied several interface effects that are critical for device operation both in terms of the print morphology and also electrical injection and back surface effects. The dielectric, in this case ZrO2, was found to be very sensitive to the sol-gel drying conditions, which are not always well controlled during printing.

In the case of memory devices, resistive switching was employed in the Ag/ZrO2/Au system to fabricate printable RRAM memory arrays. These arrays can be operated as content addressable memory, which has many applications in pattern matching, image recognition, and synaptic-like memory behavior. However, controlling the uniformity of switching, especially in printed devices, is an important challenge. In conclusion, we show that knowledge of component materials, processing effects, and interactions of materials within a device are all critical to advancing the field of printed electronics.

Image by A13ean Use licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Jeremy Smith received his MSci degree in Materials Science from the University of Cambridge in 2007 and his PhD in the Physics Department at Imperial College London. His research, under the supervision of Prof. Thomas D. Anthopoulos, was focused on the development of high mobility organic field-effect transistors with a particular interest in the links between thin-film morphology and charge transport.

He then worked in Prof. Tobin Marks’s group at Northwestern University on solution processed amorphous oxide semiconductors for printable, thin-film electronics, before conducting research with Prof. Vivek Subramanian at UC Berkeley also in the area of printed electronics.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.