SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Sept 19th2nd annual “Company Origin Stories – Exploring Entrepreneurship” – Nanotech company founders explain how and why they started their enterprises. Photos from last year posted: Here

In Council News: SF Bay Area Nanotech Council wins worldwide Nanotech Chapter of the Year award  Past Chair Nick Massetti wins Distinguished Service Award for “organizing and facilitating educational and networking events”

For our August 15th event, please see details below.


TITLE: 2D Materials Advantages and Challenges Towards Applications

SPEAKER:

Ching-Hua (Fiona) Wang, PhD. Student

Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University

Tuesday, August 15, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

Two-dimensional (2D) materials present unique opportunities for next generation ultra-thin electronics. However, practical 2D devices can only be realized after overcoming key challenges: contact resistance, stable doping, and uniform growth.
In this talk I will highlight the recent research our group has implemented to improve contact and doping in BP and MoS2 transistors.   I will then show our work beyond transistor applications using 2D materials, such as graphene-Cu interconnects and hBN-RRAM, that are promising for three-dimensional integrated electronics.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

TITLE: Giving Optical Vision to Nanorobots

SPEAKER: Dr. Wen J. Li

Chair Professor of Biomedical Engineering

Dept. of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering

City University of Hong Kong

Friday, July 21, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

The resolution of optical microscopes has been constrained by Ernst Abbe’s limit of diffraction to 200–250nm under visible light illumination since the 17th Century. The invention of the Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) about 80 years ago and Scanning Tunneling Microscope/Atomic Force Microscope (STM/AFM) about 35 years have made tremendous breakthroughs in observing and analyzing sub-diffraction scale features. Although non-optical technologies such as the SEM can provide resolution much beyond the optical diffraction limit, they are still mostly not compatible with real-time and non-destructive imaging (especially for biological samples) requirements, and therefore, a non-invasive and non-destructive imaging technology that can break the diffraction limit is still in demand.

In this lecture, we will present a novel time-efficient and non-invasive microsphere-based scanning superlens microscopy (SSUM) method that enables the observation of biological and non-bioligical samples over a large area with sub-diffraction limited resolution.  This technology operates in both non-invasive and contact modes with approximately 200 times the acquisition efficiency of atomic force microscopy. Our method marks a path to visible light based non-invasive nanoscale resolution with foreseeable applications in integrated circuit defect detection and bio-molecular imaging.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

    Wen J. Li (BSc/MSc, Univ. of Southern California, and PhD, UCLA) is Chair Professor of Biomedical Engineering in the Dept. of Mechanical and Biomedical Engineering of the City University of Hong Kong (CityU).  He is currently the President of the IEEE Nanotechnology Council and Director of the Institute for Intelligent Cyber Physical Sensing Systems of the Shenzhen Academy of Robotics, China. Prior to joining CityU, Dr. Li was with The Chinese University of Hong Kong (1997-2011), where he headed the Centre for Micro and Nano Systems. He held research positions at the NASA/CalTech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (1995-1997) and The Aerospace Corporation (1989-1995) before moving to Hong Kong in 1997.

Dr. Li’s team has published more than 300 technical papers related to MEMS, nanotechnology, and robotics; the team has received best conference/student paper awards from well-known conferences such as IEEE-ICRA, IEEE/ASME AIM, IEEE-ROBIO, and IEEE-NANO in the past 15 years.

Dr. Li served as the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Nanotechnology Magazine (2007 to 2013) and is an Editorial Board Member of Scientific Reports.   Dr. Li was elected IEEE Fellow in 2010 and ASME Fellow in 2011, and was a Distinguished Overseas Scholar of the Chinese Academy of Sciences.  He also held/holds honorary academic positions at the Shenyang Institute of Automation, Peking University, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, and Soochow University.

Dr. Li’s current research interest includes super-resolution nanoscopy, cyber physical sensors, and micro/nano robotics for biomedical applications.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

TITLE:  Engineering Nanomaterials for Energy Conversion

SPEAKER: Dr. Xiaolin Zheng, Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Stanford University

Tuesday, June 20, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

 

 

ABSTRACT:

Nanomaterials are broadly studied and used in renewable energy and sustainability-focused science and technology. And yet, a key challenge is to develop scalable and economic synthetic routes for the mass production of nanomaterials. In this talk, I will present a new pathway of using flame as a scalable reactor to synthesis binary, ternary, doped and branched metal oxide nanowires with controlled physical morphology and chemical compositions. I will also report a combined solution-flame method that combines flame synthesis with sol-gel chemistry to modify existing nanomaterials with coatings, doping, reduction and oxidation. These new flame synthesis routes exhibit the unique advantages of self-purification process, ultrafast growth rate, atmospheric and continuous operation. These flame-synthesized nanomaterials are of high quality and when they are applied as key elements in photoelectrochemical (or solar) water-splitting devices that has led to the best performance to date. Finally, I will discuss a peel-and-stick method for manufacturing flexible and light weight thin film solar cells that could enable the attachment of solar cells to virtually any surface, ranging from existing building walls and windows, car roofs, light poles, backpacks and paper to portable electronics, significantly broadening the applications of solar cells.

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Xiaolin Zheng is an Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. She received her Ph.D. in Mechanical & Aerospace Engineering from Princeton University (2006), B.S. in Thermal Engineering from Tsinghua University (2000). Prior to joining Stanford in 2007, she did her postdoctoral work in the Department of Chemistry and Chemical Biology at Harvard University. Her research interests include flame synthesis of nanomaterials and their applications in solar energy conversion, and developing manufacturing methods for flexible electronic devices. She is a member of MRS, ACS and the Combustion Institute. Her research has been honored with awards including the Resonant Energy Award from Caltech (2016), Nano Letters Young Investigator Lectureship (2015), MIT Technology Review (2013), one of the 100 Leading Global Thinkers by the Foreign Policy Magazine (2013), 3M Nontenured Faculty Award from 3M (2013), Presidential Early Career Award for Scientists and Engineers (PECASE) from the White House (2009), Young Investigator Awards from the ONR (2008) and DARPA (2008), Terman Fellowship from Stanford (2007), and Bernard Lewis Fellowship from the Combustion Institute (2004).

For additional information: http://www.stanford.edu/group/zheng

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council Chapter 13th Annual Full Day Symposium

“Nanotechnology in : The Environment, Advanced Batteries, Clean Energy”

May 16, 2017 8:30AM – 4:30 PM

SEMI Global Headquarters, 673 South Milpitas Boulevard, Milpitas, CA 95035

Register here

This symposium brings together leading academic, government and industry experts to discuss the innovation opportunities and technical challenges associated with the deployment of nanotechnology in the  above areas. Presentation Topics and Speakers include:

Nano Material Toxicity

Marie-Noele Croteau, USGS

Regulating Nano Toxicity

Jeffrey Wong, California Environmental Protection Agency

Hydrogen Storage

Jen Dionne, Stanford University

Carbon Dioxide Capture

Robert Aines, Livermore

Nanostructured, Bio-Derived Materials for Next-Generation Li-ion Batteries

Brennan Campbell, NexTech Batteries && Robert Ionescu, HP Labs

Carbon Nanotube Batteries for Solar Grid Storage & Electric Vehicles

John Wong, CTO, Magi Scitech

Job Seeker assistance will be available at this event, including a table with CVs and resumes available for people to pick up and an “Announcement Slide” which will be projected during the initial networking portion of the day. Job seekers, please bring your resumes to display on said table, send a one line description to be displayed on the “Announcement Slide” to SFBA.Nano.Jobs@gmail.com by May 14.

Register here

 Sponsors Include:


TITLE: Fully Inkjet-Printed RRAM Memory Circuits for Solution-Processed Electronics

SPEAKER: Jeremy Smith, PhD., U.C. Berkeley

Tuesday, April 18, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

Inkjet printing provides a convenient, digital, additive manufacturing process to demonstrate the compatibility of solution-processed electronic materials suitable for flexible electronics, roll-to-roll processing, and large-area electronics.

This study also highlights some of the challenges of controlling film formation, nanoparticle ink development, and materials interactions in a realistic situation. I will discuss the use of sol-gel oxides and metal nanoparticle inks in a 3D printer for fabricating novel transistors and RRAM memory devices. In particular, using fully printed thin-film transistors (TFT),

I have studied several interface effects that are critical for device operation both in terms of the print morphology and also electrical injection and back surface effects. The dielectric, in this case ZrO2, was found to be very sensitive to the sol-gel drying conditions, which are not always well controlled during printing.

In the case of memory devices, resistive switching was employed in the Ag/ZrO2/Au system to fabricate printable RRAM memory arrays. These arrays can be operated as content addressable memory, which has many applications in pattern matching, image recognition, and synaptic-like memory behavior. However, controlling the uniformity of switching, especially in printed devices, is an important challenge. In conclusion, we show that knowledge of component materials, processing effects, and interactions of materials within a device are all critical to advancing the field of printed electronics.

Image by A13ean Use licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Jeremy Smith received his MSci degree in Materials Science from the University of Cambridge in 2007 and his PhD in the Physics Department at Imperial College London. His research, under the supervision of Prof. Thomas D. Anthopoulos, was focused on the development of high mobility organic field-effect transistors with a particular interest in the links between thin-film morphology and charge transport.

He then worked in Prof. Tobin Marks’s group at Northwestern University on solution processed amorphous oxide semiconductors for printable, thin-film electronics, before conducting research with Prof. Vivek Subramanian at UC Berkeley also in the area of printed electronics.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

TITLE: Why STT-MRAM Will Soon Make A Major Market Impact


dong-il-moonSPEAKER:

Barry Hoberman, CEO and Chairman of the Board,

Spin Transfer Technologies, Inc.

Tuesday, March 21, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

 

ABSTRACT:

Thin film magnetics has been the heart of high density, high latency data storage for decades.  Semiconductor memory has filled the province of high throughput, low latency data storage.  Advances in semiconductor memory, particularly Flash, have enabled SSD’s to  encroach on the disk storage world.  Conversely, a technology from the historical disk drive domain of thin film magnetics will soon drive a new segment of semiconductor memory.  The magnetic tunnel junction, or MTJ, implemented with perpendicular magnetic orientation, and leveraging ‘spin transfer torque’ switching, will soon emerge to enable a significant new position in the semiconductor memory market.  New techniques for improving the switching characteristics of pMTJ devices will advance the state of the industry.

Image by A13ean Use licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Barry Hoberman has served as CEO and Chairman of Spin Transfer Technologies since 2012.  He has over 35 years of management and engineering expertise in the semiconductor industry. Prior to his current role, he served as chief marketing officer at Crocus Technology, a semiconductor company.

Earlier, Hoberman was the founder and CEO of inSilicon, a leading semiconductor IP supplier, which was acquired by Synopsys in 2002. His leadership experience also includes CEO positions with Virtual Silicon and T-Zero Technologies. Earlier in his career, Hoberman held management positions at AMD and Monolithic Memories.

Hoberman holds B.S. degrees in Electrical Engineering and Biology from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and over 30 US patents.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

TITLE: Self Healing Nano-Electronics for Nano-Spacecraft in Deep Space Missions


dong-il-moonSPEAKER:

Dr. Dong-Il Moon, NASA Ames Research Center
Mountain View, CA

Tuesday, February 7, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

ABSTRACT:
Small satellites consisting of a set of integrated circuits (IC), i.e., nano-spacecraft, have been introduced recently to solve challenges such as propulsion cost and launch weight. The conventional spaceship takes 18,000 years from Earth to a nearest star, i.e., Alpha Centauri, but the spacecraft-on-a-chip technology dramatically reduces the travel time to 20 years due to its light weight and great energy efficiency. However, high risks of radiation induced damages and mission period over 20 years (longer than usual lifetime of IC) are considered as technology barriers. It is intrinsically impossible to avoid unexpected radiation exposure. The shielding metal adds significant weight, which nullifies the fundamental advantage of the nano-spacecraft. In this talk, self-healing process is introduced for sustainable space electronics. Degradation and recovery mechanisms for total ionizing dose, single event effect, hot carrier, and tunneling stress are discussed in silicon nanowire gate-all-around FETs. Dual contact pads of the gate allow current flow creating heat for on-chip annealing, which recovers interface states and bulk traps in the gate dielectric. The effect of the self-healing is examined for practical applications such as a logic transistor, high-speed DRAM, and non-volatile Flash memory. Therefore, the lifetime of devices can be extended, which opens an opportunity for nano-spacecraft sustainable for more than 20 years of deep space exploration. The technology will have an impact on terrestrial applications with critical requirements as well.

 

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dong-Il Moon is a postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Nanotechnology at NASA Ames Research Center. He was previously a senior engineer of Device & Process Integration Technology Group at SK Hynix (2015). He received Ph.D. (2015) and M.S. (2010) in EE from KAIST, and B.S. (2008) in EECS from Kyungpook National University. His honors include the best Ph.D. thesis award in Department of EE at KAIST (2015), grand prize for thesis award from Lam Research Korea (2014), the best research student award in EE from KAIST twice (2012, 2014). His research includes fundamental and applied aspects of nano devices. He has explored the emerging nanoscale devices in layout, mask fabrication, wafer processing, simulation, and modeling. Especially, he led a research team responsible for developing the suspended silicon nanowire on a bulk silicon substrate, which is used as a basic building block for a nano-scale circuit. Based on the developed novel process, advanced MOSFETs such as a gate-all-around FET, a tri-gate FinFET, and an independently controlled double-gate FET were fabricated, which were utilized for various applications such as a logic transistor, a memory cell, and a biosensor. He has authored or coauthored one book chapter, 70 articles in peer-reviewed scientific journals, and 16 proceeding papers for international conferences.

 

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

 

Please register here.


 

TITLE: Toward realization of a silicon-based qubit system for quantum computing


malcolm-carroll-headshot
SPEAKER:
Dr. Malcolm Carroll, Principal Investigator for research on quantum computing at Sandia National Laboratories,
Albuquerque, NM

Thursday, Dec. 8th, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

 

ABSTRACT (extended here):
A qubit is a unit of quantum information—the fundamental currency of quantum computing, which is predicted to be hugely more efficient for solving problems that are challenging for traditional computers, such as breaking secret codes. This presentation will describe a path to development of a practical qubit design based on silicon CMOS processing technology. The qubit device is an electrostatic silicon quantum dot (QD) with an implanted donor. We demonstrate for the first time coherent two-axis control of a two-electron spin logical qubit that evolves under QD-donor exchange interaction as well as interaction with the donor nucleus, with decoherence as good as that of competing systems.

 

carroll-graphic

malcolm-carroll-pictures

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY (extended here):
Malcolm Carroll is the Principal Investigator for research on silicon quantum computing at Sandia National Laboratories, including development of quantum dots, cryoelectronics and quantum error correction schemes for future quantum circuitry. In 2001 he received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University and joined Bell Labs/Lucent Technologies at Murray Hill, NJ. In 2003 and 2006 he became a senior and then principal member of the technical staff at Sandia National Laboratories. Dr. Carroll was a Fulbright Fellow and has been an author on over 50 peer reviewed articles and 3 patents. He co-founded and is an organizing committee member of the Silicon Quantum Computing Workshop series and is an external advisor for the Australian Centre for Quantum Computing Technology.

 

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

 

Please register here.


Please register for the fall symposium here.

Scroll down to see schedule of talks.

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