SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Join us for our 10th Annual Half Day Fall Symposium on Energy Storage

Tuesday Nov 18,2014
12:30 AM – 4:30 PM
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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Agenda:

12:15 Registration Begins
 
12:30 Networking and Lunch
 
1:00 Welcome and Introductions
 
1:10 Fueling the future: Safe, Dense, Reversible Hydrogen Storage in Hybrid Nanomaterials
Dr. Jeff Urban

Staff Scientist, Materials Science Division
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

Historical trends have shown gradual decarbonization of our fuel sources over hundreds of years, the ultimate endpoint of which is hydrogen. Hydrogen fuel cell applications offer safe, emissions-free energy and all of the major auto manufacturers have made commitments to the technology. However, despite this technological push, there remain fundamental scientific issues that have delayed widespread adoption of the technology. In this talk, I’ll discuss ongoing work in my group to develop hybrid nanomaterials approaches to safe, energy-dense, and reversible hydrogen storage in metallic Magnesium nanocrystals, with a focus on new work on 2D hybrid materials. This talk will specifically highlight new work which advances these materials toward room-temperature storage and the atomic limit of selective encapsulation.

1:45 Nanomaterials Enabled Hydrogen Storage Technology & Its Role In Mitigating Climate Change
Dr. Lennie Klebanoff

Sandia National Laboratory

A “big picture” presentation of the need for hydrogen technology to deal with global climate change, with some technical discussion of how nanomaterials can influence hydrogen storage together with some recent R&D results.

2:20 Extending Battery Storage Now with Silicon and Software
Dania Ghantous

VP Technology, Qnovo
Extending Battery Storage Now with Silicon and Software

Lithium ion batteries have come a long way since they were first commercialized. The improvements in performance are based on materials innovation, design and optimization of the manufacturing process. However, with the ever increasing demands from consumer and automotive applications, lithium ion batteries are still lacking in performance. This presentation will provide an overview of the status and challenges of lithium ion batteries and introduce the audience to Qnovo’s unique approach to improving battery performance.

2:55 Networking & Break
 
3:10 Impact of Nano- and Meso-structure on the Performance of Capacitors
Dr. Michael Stadermann

Staff Scientist, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

The morphology of supercapacitor electrodes can significantly affect their performance. The dimensions of pores on the nanoscale has been shown to affect the capacitance per area, while the dimensions of pores on the mesoscale can affects mass transport and power density. In this presentation, I will discuss modeling and experimental results on how pore dimensions can give rise to increased capacitance, and how altering of mesoscale pore dimensions by compressing the electrode affects energy and power density. Finally, I will show how hierarchical pore structures improve performance of capacitive desalination devices.

3:45 Monolithic Carbon Nanotube Electrodes: Technology and Energy Storage Applications
Dr. Phil Kraus

CEO Ultora

Ultora has developed a proprietary method to grow carbon nanotubes directly from a metal foil, providing a means of producing flexible, monolithic CNT electrodes in a single processing step. The novel growth method results in excellent adhesion and electrical contact between the CNTs and the metal foil. Ultora’s CNT electrodes comprise only materials – CNTs and metal foil – that are stable at high temperatures. When paired with ionic liquid electrolytes, supercapacitorsare made that are operable at very high temperatures – more than twice the typical maximum operating temperature of commercial supercapacitors. Applications of Ultora’s monolithic CNT-on-foil material,where low mass and thermal stability are important include: harsh environments, thermal interface materials, electromagnetic shielding, infrared absorption materials, and catalyst substrates.

4:20 The impact of Battery and Fuel Cell Storage on the Automotive Marketplace
John Suh

Executive Director Hyundai Ventures
4:55 Symposium concludes
 

Advance Registration Fees (Lunch included):

  • IEEE members & unemployed: $10
  • Non-Members: $15
  • Students: $5

Signup and pay here before November 16. (Saves $5 from at-the door price.)

At the door payments (cash and check only) – $5 additional. Please RSVP here


mateusz_bryning
Tuesday October 21, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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Please RSVP here.

TITLE: Low-cost, Flexible Displays using Nanoscale Droplets

SPEAKER: Dr. Mateusz Bryning, CTO, Zikon

ABSTRACT:
Zikon’s display technology uses nano-droplets of colored ink to create images on paper like substrates. Images can be changed by application of low voltages, which move the polarizable nano-droplets within the “paper” substrate under a combination of dipolar and/or electrophoretic forces. Unlike traditional electrophoretic e-paper displays, the technology requires no microencapsulation of the droplets, and is amenable to reflective as well as transmissive/transparent displays. Additional benefits include low-voltage operation and simplified “print-shop” display module manufacturing. The technology is particularly well suited to the needs of the $20B electronic shelf label market by offering a low cost, low voltage, low power consumption display that also has a sharp, paperlike appearance. The talk will describe our growing understanding of nano-droplet properties and the complex behaviors they can exhibit in electric fields, as well as progress toward manufacturing of low-cost shelf label displays.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Mateusz Bryning, Chief Technology Officer of Zikon, is a physicist with ten years of experience in discovering, developing and transferring new technology into application. He specializes in emerging technologies in nanotechnology, complex fluids, and advanced materials. He is Principal Investigator on NSF SBIR Phase II grant that partly supports Zikon’s development efforts. Dr. Bryning is also a Core Team consultant with SmallTech Consulting and serves as Adjunct Faculty at San Jose State University, where he teaches laboratory courses in MEMS and microfluidics and co-advises several students. Dr. Bryning holds a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Pennsylvania, where his research focused on carbon nanotube networks.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: Free! Just RSVP.

Please RSVP here.


Robert Miller
Tuesday September 16, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: Nanogel star polymers as interesting soft colloid materials for biomedical applications

SPEAKERS: Dr. Robert D. Miller, IBM Almaden Research Center

ABSTRACT:
Polymers have numerous biomedical applications including delivery of therapeutic materials, imaging applications, tissue regeneration, antimicrobial action and others. We have developed a route to nanogel core star polymer amphiphiles with control over size, functionality, end groups and molecular architecture. These particles can either be biostable or biodegradable depending on the desired application. These materials encapsulate hydrophobic materials such as dyes at the 10-15% level without covalent bonding. The outer shell also sequesters magnetic particles for MRI studies and ligates ions such as copper 64 for PET. The outer shell can also be used to generate a functional silica shell or catalyze the electroless deposition of a gold shell. The later leads to a surface plasmon resonance absorption shifted into the near IR suitable for inducing hyperthermic processes in cells upon irradiation. We have also studied the antimicrobial properties of suitable substituted nanogel star polymers derivatives.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Robert D. Miller received his PhD in Organic Chemistry from Cornell University. He joined IBM at the T.J. Watson Research Laboratories in Yorktown Heights NY after his postdoctoral year and moved to the San Jose Research laboratory in 1972. He currently manages the Advanced Organic Materials Department at the IBM Almaden Research Laboratory.His research activities have included a wide range of technologies from: basic photochemical processes and mechanisms, radiation sensitive polymers and microlithography, controlled polymerization techniques, to nanoporous thin films for Bioscience, Optics and Photonics, photovoltaic materials and structures, sublithographic self assembly using block copolymers, air bridge dielectrics, radiation definable dielectrics, solution and CVD precursors for low-k applications, and others.

He is a member of the American Chemical Society and the Materials Research Society and currently serves on the editorial advisory boards of Chemical Reviews and Advanced Functional Materials. During his career, he has received five IBM awards for outstanding technical achievements, 31 invention plateau awards and is a member of the IBM Academy of Technology. Dr Miller was elected a Fellow of the Division of Polymeric Materials Science and Engineering (PMSE) in 2006 , the Materials Research Society (MRS) in 2007 and the American Chemical Society in 2011. In 2009, he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering and is the recipient of the 2010 American Chemical Society award for Chemistry of Materials Dr. Miller is a co-inventor on more than 70 patents and patent publications and has published more than 350 articles in refereed technical journals.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

RajadasTuesday August 19, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: In-Situ Soft Nano Particles for Targeted Drug Delivery

SPEAKERS: Dr. Jayakumar Rajadas, Director of Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory, Stanford University School of Medicine

ABSTRACT:
Pre-Designed nanosomes, self-assembled liposome shells used to protect and help active molecules penetrate cells, interact with biofluids such as blood and intestine secretions to develop into structures of desired patterns. We have shown these soft particles can recognize endothelial linings of the blood capillaries that are proximal to the affected tissues in the heart, brain and liver. We have used these structures to stabilize and target the fragile peptides, proteins and water insoluble therapeutic molecules to different organs. We use various biophysical approaches such as AFM, fluorescence, and NMR to understand the structural details of these molecules

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Jayakumar Rajadas is the Founding Director of the Biomaterials and Advanced Drug Delivery Laboratory at Stanford University as well as Assistant Director Cardiovascular Pharmacology Division, Stanford Cardiovascular Institute. He is also a Lecturer in the Department of Neurology and Neurological Sciences. His research has involved transforming nano science ideas into biomaterial and drug delivery technologies. Before moving to Stanford, he served as the founding chair of the Bio-organic and Neurochemistry Division at one of India’s national laboratories. He is a recipient of several awards including Young scientist award in chemistry for the year 1996 from the Government of India. He has also won the best scientist award from the Tamilnadu State Government India in the year 1999. He is also co-recipient of nine SPARK translational awards in Stanford University. He has published over 150 papers with numerous patent disclosures. He received his MS in Chemistry at the University of Madras and his Ph. D in Biophysical Chemistry at the Indian Institute of Technology.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

holger_schmidtTuesday July 29, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: Nanoscale Optofluidic Devices

SPEAKERS: Prof. Holger Schmidt, Department of Electrical Engineering, UC Santa Cruz

ABSTRACT:
Integrated photonic devices have traditionally been designed for data communications using exclusively solid-state materials. However, a vast area of potential applications, in particular in the life sciences, involve interactions of light with liquids and gases. Recently, a number of optofluidic approaches have been considered that are aimed at integrating such non-solid media with chip-scale photonic structures. We have developed a versatile, planar photonic platform based on hollow-core optical waveguides. I will describe the physical foundations and optical characteristics of this platform and a broad range of devices and capabilities that are made possible by this approach. In particular, I will discuss the incorporation of nanoscale features for enhanced chip-scale particle detection, manipulation and trapping. I will outline a path to a fluidically and optically integrated “optofluidic” platform that enables direct detection of single nucleic acids and proteins for a new generation of photonics-based molecular diagnostic instruments.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Holger Schmidt received his PhD degree in electrical and computer engineering from the University of California, Santa Barbara. After serving as a Postdoctoral Fellow at M.I.T., he joined the University of California, Santa Cruz in 2001 where he is Narinder Kapany Professor of electrical engineering and Director of the W.M. Keck Center for Nanoscale Optofluidics. His research interests cover a broad range in photonics and integrated optics, including optofluidic devices, atom photonics, nano-magneto-optics, nonlinear optics, and ultrafast optics. He has over 200 publications and co-edited the CRC Handbook of Optofluidics. He is an OSA Fellow and the recipient of an NSF Career Award and a Keck Futures Nanotechnology Award.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

Wei-WuTuesday June 10, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: Sub-5 nm Patterning Using Helium Ion Beam and Nanoimprint Lithography

SPEAKERS: Prof. Wei Wu, Department of EE, University of Southern California

ABSTRACT:
Helium ion beam lithography (HIBL) is a recently developed nanolithography technology. It uses a He ion beam to direct write patterns in the same fashion as electron beam lithography (EBL). Due to its advantages, such as smaller focusing spot and less proximity effects than electron beam, it can go beyond the resolution of EBL. We have demonstrated patterning of various nano-patterns using HIBL. For example, we achieved dense lines with half-pitch down to 4 nm. Moreover, we also achieved sub-5 nm patterning using nanoimprint lithography (NIL) with molds fabricated by HIBL. The combination of NIL and HIBL mitigates the two major drawbacks of HIBL: low throughput and the tendency to damage substrates. We also used HIBL as a direct milling tool to pattern metal and Graphene with dense lines down to 4 nm half-pitch. Our Raman spectra show that the HIBL patterned Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) have lower line-edge roughness than reported GNRs patterned by EBL.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Wei Wu graduated from Peking University with a BS in Physics in 1996, and received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 2003. He joined the Ming Hsieh Department of Electrical Engineering at the University of Southern California as an associate Professor January, 2012. Before joining USC, he worked as a senior scientist at HP labs. His work includes high-resolution nano-fabrication and applications in nano-photonics, nano-electronics, renewable energy harvesting and chemical sensing. He coauthored 80 peer reviewed journal papers, 1 book chapter and more than 80 conference presentations. He has 64 granted US patents and 52 pending applications. He is co-editor of Applied Physics A.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

Koropachinskiy (L) & PredtechenskyTuesday May 20, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: Low-cost scalable production and applications of single-walled carbon nanotubes

SPEAKERS: Prof Mikhail Predtechensky, CTO, & Mr Yuri Koropachinsky, President, OCSiAl Group

ABSTRACT:
The closure by Bayer and Showa Denko of their large-scale facilities for the production of multi-walled CNT (MWCNT) is a benchmark event in the CNT industry. The reason for the scaling down of the production of MWCNT is that, regardless of the low price of MWCNT, their agglomerated form significantly hampers their introduction into the matrix, and what is especially important, in order to achieve similar properties of materials one needs to introduce into the material incomparably higher concentrations of MWCNT, than if one were to use SWCNT. There are two barriers for the broad application of SWCNT – their high price (tens of thousands of $ per kg) and the absence of scalable technologies for their synthesis. In order for industrial applications to become possible their price needs to be reduced to single digit $ per kg, and there have to be reactors producing at least tons of SWCNT per annum. This presentation announces the creation by OCSiAl of a new technology for the production of single wall carbon nanotubes and demonstrates the possibilities for improving the properties of different materials through the addition of such nanotubes. The presentation demonstrates some results of the above-mentioned applications of SWCNT including conductive composites which can be painted electrostatically, flexible transparent conductive film with high transparency and low resistance. lithium-ion batteries with increased power and cycle life, and many others Thus, the mass availability of low cost SWCNT has the potential to cause very significant impact on a variety of industries.

SPEAKERS BIOGRAPHIES:
Mikhail Predtechensky is a member of the Board of Directors and one of the founders of OCSiAl, also Chief Technology Officer of the company. He is the author of the technology for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes, implemented by OCSiAl. He also leads R&D projects related to various applications of CNT. Mr Predtechensky is an acknowledged specialist in the areas of the synthesis of nano materials, energetics, mechanics, thermal physics and plasma physics. His key inventions include the plasma-chemical reactor, the solder jet technology, a method of coal preparation, solid oxide fuel cells and others. Mr Predtechensky is a graduate of the Novosibirsk Electro-Technical Institute (Novosibirsk State Technical University). He is Doctor of Physical and Mathematical Sciences. Member of the Russian Academy of Sciences. Author of more than 200 scientific publications and patents.

Yuri Koropachinskiy is one of the founders and Chairman of the Board of OCSiAl, Prior to his business career, Yuri was involved in scientific research in Biophysics, while working for the Siberian branch of Academy of Science of the USSR.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council 10th Anniversary Full Day Symposium

“The Promise and Progress of Nanotech Enabled 2D Devices and Materials”

Friday April 18, 2014
8:30 AM – 4:30  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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Co-Sponsored by IEEE SCV Electron Devices Chapter

Devices derived from atomically thin sheet crystalline materials are among the latest revolutions to come out of the past decade’s focus on Nanotechnology. These so-called 2D materials hold the promise of vastly improved electrical, thermal, optical, structural and piezoelectric properties. They may be arriving just in time to shore up the slowing pace of 3D silicon based advances. They go by the now familiar names Graphene and Germanene as well as the emerging names Stanene, Silicene, and Moly disulfide. The IEEE San Francisco Bay Area Nanotechnology Council Chapter will devote its 10th Anniversary Fall Symposium to showcase the breadth of the exciting work being done in the Bay Area and beyond to reveal the promise of these uniquely nanotechnology enabled structures.

The symposium will provide a forum for networking and exchange of information among local academics, engineers, early stage venture capitalists and entrepreneurs who are moving nanotechnology beyond single dimension applications and into the world of 2D where cooperation is again shown to magnify beneficial results.

Presentations will cover:

  • Research and commercialization of one or a few atom thick materials or surface effects.
  • Materials like Graphene, Stanene, Silicene, Germanene, Moly disulfide, Boron Nitrice, etc.
  • Dramatic improvements in electrical, thermal, optical, structural and piezoelectric properties.
  • Applications such as batteries, super capacitors, sensors, integrated circuits, optical & piezoelectric devices.

Agenda
8:30-9:10    Registration and Networking

9:10-9:15    Welcome: Nick Massetti, 2014 Chair, IEEE SFBA Nanotech Council

9:15-9:55    Opening Remarks by Rep Mike Honda, 17th US Congressional District
NNI’s legacy, Mature technologist’s employment, Immigration,…

9:55-10:05   Coffee Break

10:05-12:05 Session 1: Graphene Growth, Doping, Characteristics

10:05-10:45 Prof. Oscar Dubon, UC Berkeley
Growth Behavior of Graphene on Metal Substrates

10:45-11:25 Dr. Nan Liu, Stanford University
Graphene-Organic Interface & Rational Control of Electronic Properties
Adobe_PDF_Icon.svgDownload presentation here.

 

11:25-12:05 Prof. Jeanie Lau, UC Riverside
1, 2, 3… Ripples, Gaps and Transport in Graphene Membranes
Adobe_PDF_Icon.svgDownload presentation here.

 

12:05-1:20  Lunch and Poster Session

1:20-2:40    Session 2: 2D Enabled Devices and Applications

1:20-2:00    Prof. Min Hwan Lee, UC Merced
Graphene-based Air Electrodes for Solid Oxide Electrochemical Cells
Adobe_PDF_Icon.svgDownload presentation here.

 

2:00-2:40    Prof. Sayeef Salahuddin, UC Berkeley
Electronics with 2D semiconductors and their heterostructures

2:40-2:55    Break-Refreshments

2:55-4:15    Session 3: Near 2D Effects and Applications

2:55-3:35    Prof. Jiang Wei, Tulane University
2D Binary Transition Metal Chalcogenide and Beyond

3:35-4:15    Prof. Xiaogan Liang, University of Michigan
MoS2-Based Multi-Bit Memories Fabricated by Plasma-Induced Self-Formation of Charge Storage Layers

 

Registration Fee (Lunch Included):
IEEE Members: $50
Non-Members: $65
Students & Between employment & Life Members: SPECIAL $20 (normally $35)


RavilisettyTuesday March 18, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
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TITLE: Nanophosphors in Cancer Diagnosis, Therapeutics and Drug Delivery

SPEAKER: Dr. P. R. Ravilisetty, President Specialty Phosphors Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Mammography is considered to be the best tool for the detection of breast cancer, and high-resolution images can detect cancer more accurately than other systems, particularly with computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Current digital mammography systems use needle shape CsI:Tl phosphor pixels <100 μm in size. The stability and life span of these phosphor needles are limited due to their hygroscopic and fragile nature. Our approach to avoid current limitations in digital mammography is to grow micron-size pillars of very stable scintillator materials using novel nanophosphors.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used clinically where a photosensitizer such as Photofrin is activated with laser light to produce oxygen radicals that kill cancer cells. Visible light only penetrates few millimeters into tissue. IR light penetrates much deeper, but does not activate photo sensitizers. Upconverting phosphors (UCPs) absorb infrared photons and emit visible photons. Due to low conversion efficiency, UCPs do not deliver enough visible light. X-ray excitable nanophosphors are good candidates to deliver higher flux visible light to sensitize PDT drug. Currently, we are investigating the possibility of adopting inorganic nanophosphors as a biological contrast agent for medical imaging in X-ray/optical combo. We are also working on X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), a new molecular imaging modality with medical research groups at Stanford University. This combined modality may yield an increase in the utility of omnipresent X-ray imaging by enabling concurrent molecular imaging. Nanophosphors with magnetic properties are being explored at SPI in drug delivery.

Nanophosphors synthesis, characterization, and possibilities of using in early detection of breast cancer, X-ray PDT, medical imaging in a combined X-ray/optical instrument and drug delivery will be presented.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Ravilisetty is a President of Specialty Phosphors Inc., a startup company dedicated to development and manufacturing of nanophosphors for medical, display, lighting and security applications. Dr. Ravilisetty spent five years in CECRI (Government Lab.), India developing optically stimulated dosimetry and color TV phosphors. At Panasonic Plasma Display Lab, he spent more than 12 years developing novel, highly efficient, and small size particle phosphors for plasma display panels (PDP). He continued his development of phosphors at Sarnoff Research Institute (SRI) International for display and lighting applications. During his 35 years career, Dr. Ravilisetty published his research and development findings extensively as journal publications (96), books (2), & patents (19) He is Fellow/Senior/active member of SID, IEEE, Luminescence Soc of India, ISI, etc. He obtained his Ph. D. degree in Materials Science from Indian Institute of Technology.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

Gold Ribbon canstockphoto2647524The IEEE Region 6 2014 Outstanding Chapter Award was just awarded to our own IEEE San Francisco Bay Area Nanotechnology Council Chapter. (The highest award for IEEE Chapters.)

Region 6 has 228 IEEE Chapters in 12 States. It is the largest IEEE Region and holds about 60,000 members out of the IEEE worldwide total of 430,000 members.

Many of our current Executive Committee have been helping to build this Chapter for the last 10 years and we are pleased to share this recognition with our event attendees, many of whom have participated over that entire time and also contributed in many ways.

Thank you and congratulations to us all.

Nick Massetti
2014 Chair, Executive Steering Committee