SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

Archive for 2012

Commercializing Nanoelectronics: Opportunities in Material and Life Sciences

Tuesday, December 4th, 2012

January 15, 2013 Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

 

TITLE: Commercializing Nanoelectronics: Opportunities in Material and Life Sciences

SPEAKER: Mark Bunger, Research Director, Lux Research Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Printed electronics promises the ability to manufacture devices through low-cost, high-throughput manufacturing with novel materials and inks. Three materials areas – opaque conductive inks and pastes, transparent conductors, and semiconductors — present a total opportunity of nearly $3 billion in 2017. Opaque conductive inks are a leading segment, with medical and RFID among the fastest-growing applications; ITO replacement transparent conductive films will come from a single application: smartphone touch screens. In healthcare, this presentation will assess emerging sensor, treatment, and electrode technologies across eight markets to uncover business opportunities for printed, flexible, and organic electronics.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Mark Bünger is a Research Director at Lux Research. Based in the firm’s San Francisco office, Mark currently leads the Alternative Fuels, Bio-based Materials and Chemicals and Targeted Delivery practices. He joined Lux Research with 14 years of business strategy experience, both as a management consultant and technology analyst. Previously, Mark was a Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, an International Engagement Manager at European consultancy Icon Medialab, and a Managing Director of Icon Medialab’s U.S. office. The first six years of Mark’s career were spent at Accenture in the U.S., U.K., and Sweden.
Mark’s education includes International Marketing at Mälardalen Polytechnic in Sweden, and Market Research at the University of Texas in the U.S. He also studied biochemistry through the University of California at Berkeley’s extension program and currently works in the Center for Quantitiatve Biology at the University of California, San Francisco.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

Presentations slides are available on Lux Research’s website


 


 

Atomistic aspects of the resistive switching characteristics in RRAM devices

Friday, November 9th, 2012

December 4, 2012 Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

 

 

 

 

 

 

TITLE: Atomistic aspects of the resistive switching characteristics in RRAM devices

SPEAKER: Blanka Magyari-Köpe, Senior Research Engineer, EE Department, Stanford

ABSTRACT:
Recently, numerous experimental and theoretical investigations are undertaken in academia as well as various product-oriented efforts are going on in industry for resistives witching memory. The rapid rise in publications for RRAM have mostly dealt with resistive switching mechanism, electronic conduction mechanisms for both “ON” and “OFF” state, formation and annihilation of conductive paths, and addressing scalability, retention and endurance issues. Perhaps still the major “unknown” is how we can reach clearer understanding of resistive switching mechanism by a rigorous physics based modeling which can serve for materials and structural optimization of RRAM cell, followed by selection devices and memory array configurations. This talk will discuss (1) progress made for switching mechanisms for resistive switching in terms of “ON” and “OFF” state formation energies, which has implications to switching power scaling coupled with retention characteristics, (2) physical mechanism of the “ON” conduction by using ab-initio simulation techniques which delineate the role of oxygen vacancies in forming a conductive filament in transition metal oxides, (3) investigation of various metal electrodes and dopants effects, to assess the scalability and endurance in terms of programming power reduction as well as variability improvement and retention characteristics.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Blanka Magyari-Köpe received her Ph.D. degree in physics from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, in 2003. Since 2006, she has been an engineering Research Associate and from 2011 a Senior Research Engineer in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Prior to this position she was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles.
Her research interests include adapting and applying high-precision, accurate and efficient quantum mechanical modeling to real applications. She had been working on the analysis and fundamental understanding of electronic properties of novel and technologically relevant materials, i.e., perovskites, metal alloys, hydrogen storage materials, metal gate/high-k MOS structures and RRAM device materials. Currently, she is involved in projects that involve understanding the RRAM switching mechanism and the role and control of nanointerfaces between metallic, insulating, and semiconducting materials, seeking solutions for how to design and manipulate them at the atomic level to achieve increased performance in electronic devices.. She has given over 24 invited talks and has published more than 40 scientific papers.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10

NanoMEMS – Dr. Héctor J. De Los Santos, Distinguished Lecturer

Tuesday, November 6th, 2012

Tuesday, November 13, 2012 Noon – 1  pm
TI Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

 

The IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council has teamed up with the IEEE Electron Devices Society SCV Chapter to bring you Distinguished Lecturer Hector De Los Santos from Los Angeles to talk about NanoMEMS and its role as an enabler of ubiquitous wireless connectivity.

 

 

TITLE: NanoMEMS
NanoMEMS exploits the convergence between nanotechnology and microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) brought about by advances in the ability to fabricate nanometer-scale electronic and mechanical device structures. While the “Nano” aspect of this field is in its infancy, and is not expected to reach maturity until well into the 21st century, its “MEMS” aspect is a topic of much current and near-term impact in, for instance, inertial sensing, biomedicine, optical and RF/Wireless communications. In this context, we will begin this talk by discussing the fundamentals of NanoMEMS, in particular, as it relates to its most speculative and futuristic paradigms and applications, and then will focus on the RF/Wireless MEMS aspect, specifically in its role as enabler of ubiquitous wireless connectivity. We conclude by pointing out potential pitfalls to be encountered in its development, in particular, by addressing the subjects of stiction and pull-in in the contexts of varactors (Casimir effect) and switches.

SPEAKER: Dr. Héctor J. De Los Santos, NanoMEMS Research, LLC, Irvine, Ca

Héctor J. De Los Santos received the Ph.D. degree from the School of Electrical Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN, in 1989. Prior to founding NanoMEMS in 2002, he spent two years as Principal Scientist at Coventor, Inc., Irvine, CA, and eleven years at Hughes Space and Communications Company, Los Angeles, where he served as Principal Investigator and Director of the Future Enabling Technologies IR&D Program where he pursued research in the areas of RF MEMS, Quantum Functional Devices and Circuits, and Photonic Bandgap Devices and Circuits. He holds over 20 US and European patents, and is author of bestseller textbooks, including Introduction to Microelectromechanical (MEM) Microwave Systems (1999), and RF MEMS Circuit Design for Wireless Communications (2001). His most recent book, Principles and Applications of NanoMEMS Physics, was published in 2005.

Dr. De Los Santos is a member of Tau Beta Pi, Eta Kappa Nu, and Sigma Xi. From 2001-2003 he lectured worldwide as an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer of the Microwave Theory and Techniques Society. Since 2006 he is an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer of the Electron Devices Society. His current research interests include, discovery, conception, theory, physics, computational modeling, simulation, analysis, design and applications (electronic, microwave and mm-waves, photonics, etc.) of devices and circuits enabled by exploiting physical phenomena occurring down to nanometer length scales, including, plasmonics, photonic crystals, RF MEMS, and mechanical systems in the quantum regime.

Dr. De Los Santos serves as a reviewer for several technical journals, including, JMEMS, T-ED, T-MTT, T-NANO, and APL, and funding agencies, in particular, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the European Science Foundation, the Australian Research Council (ARC), and the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council (NSERC) of Canada. He is an IEEE Fellow.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10

Fall Symposium: Nanovation: From Science to Startups

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

IEEE SF Bay Nanotechnology Council Presents
8th Annual Fall Symposium

“Nanovation: From Science to Startups”

Saturday October 27th 2012, 9 AM – 5 PM
Location: Stanley Hall, University Drive, UC Berkeley Campus, Berkeley CA

In association with Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science (E3S), National Science Foundation (NSF), and Berkeley Nano Club (BNC).

Since its conceptualization by Dr. Richard Feynman, Nanotechnology has come a long way in its development and the Nanotechnology Age is the likely successor of the Information Age. Its penetration in electronics, medicine, textiles etc. has been disruptive in many arenas of science and technology. Due to its enormous potential Researchers, Entrepreneurs, and Investors have shown tremendous interest in Nanotechnology and invested significantly each in their own way. This symposium is focused on bringing together the unique perspectives of these three groups and reviewing the progress so far and the ever widening landscape of Nanotechnology. Centered on the current activities of students and recent graduates this event will include a poster session.

Confirmed Speaker List:
• Keynote: Carol Mimura, Assistant Vice Chancellor for Intellectual Property & Industry Research Alliances UC, Berkeley
• Mark Bunger, Director of Research, LUX Research
• Shadi A. Dayeh, Prof, Dept of ECE, UCSD. Fellow, Center for Integrated Nanotechnologies at Los Alamos National Lab
• Jessica Koehne, Nano-bio sensing systems Scientist at NASA Ames Research Center
• Zvi Or-Bach, Founder & CEO of MonolothICTM 3D, Chairman of the Board of Zeno Semiconductor, Serial Entrepreneur
• Zachary Smith, Project Scientist and Fellow, Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology, UC Davis Medical Center
• Robert Walters, President and CEO Integrated Plasmonics Corporation
• Ben Wang, Founder and Vice President of Svaya Nanotechnologies
• Eli Yablonovitch, Prof, Dept of EECS UCB, Director NSF Center for Energy Efficient Electronics Science

Registration Fees (Light breakfast and Lunch included)

  • IEEE Members: $50, Non-members: $75
  • Students: Must register to attend at no cost
  • (A generous but limited number of no cost admissions is available)

Register by October 23rd at early bird rates and save $10!
For Pay at door registration add $10.

Special thanks to our event sponsors: Applied Materials and Svaya Nanotechnology.

Event materials


 


 


 

Novel Thermal Interface Materials for 3D Chip Stacks

Wednesday, October 3rd, 2012

 

 

 

 

October 16, 2012 Noon-1PM
TI Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive. Santa Clara, CA

 

 

TITLE: Novel Thermal Interface Materials for 3D Chip Stacks

SPEAKER: Srilakshmi Lingamneni,
Ph.D Candidate, Stanford Nanoheat Laboratory, Stanford University

ABSTRACT:

This talk will present an overview of the broad spectrum of research work being carried out at ‘Stanford Nanoheat Laboratory’, the state of the art thermal characterization tools at our lab and the novel mechanical characterization tools that are being developed. It will discuss in detail the past work, latest developments and future directions of research in nanostructured interface materials. The talk will then explore the thermal challenges of 3D IC integration and new material requirements for thermal management in 3D packaging and discuss the novel interface materials that are being developed.

SPEAKER BIO:

Srilakshmi Lingamneni received her B.Tech in Mechanical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology, Madras in 2008 and M.S. in Mechanical Engineering from Stanford University in 2010. She is currently pursuing Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering at Stanford University. She was a Stanford Mechanical Engineering department teaching assistant for the academic years, 2008-2010. Her research interests include development of various thermal interface materials for thermal management in electronics, with a particular focus on materials for 3D integrated chips.

AGENDA: Registration & light lunch 11:30am. Presentation & Q/A 12:00 to 1pm

COST:FREE

PRESENTATION: Srilakshmi Lingamneni IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology council Chapter Talk.PDF

Nanotechnology Enabled Redox Flow Batteries Give the Smart Grid a High IQ.

Tuesday, September 18th, 2012

September 18, 2012, Noon-1PM
TI Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive. Santa Clara, CA

TITLE: Nanotechnology Enabled Redox Flow Batteries Give the Smart Grid a High IQ.

SPEAKER: (UPDATE)Bret Adams Director of business Development will replace Dr. Craig Horne, Founder and CEO EnerVault Corporation

ABSTRACT:
Megawatt scale Redox Flow Batteries (RFB) can be a safe, reliable and cost effective and clean solution to utility distributed scale energy storage. The demands of peak loading and fast EV charging are immediate applications and enabling the smart grid is on the near horizon. Nanotechnology applied to separators and chemicals is enabling this disruptive technology to be the just in time disruptive solution to a major energy storage problem. Sunnyvale’s EnerVault Corporation has exploited this and is bringing fully integrated modular systems to provide an economical solution.

SPEAKER BIO:
Craig Horne is a renewable energy technology and start-up veteran in areas of, fuel cells, batteries, telecom, and nanotechnology. With more than 20 years of experience working with renewable energy technologies overlapping with 9 years in nanotechnology the majority of his career has been spent in ground-level projects (synchrotron radiation spectroscopy of Li-ion materials, nanoscale material based Li-ion components, nanoscale material and processes for telecom components, disruptive manufacturing of fuel cell stacks, new system designs for flow batteries). Among others he’s worked at nanotechnology firms like Nanogram Corporation, Kainos and NeoPhotonics Corporation. He has 19 US patents awarded, over 14 US applications pending, and numerous international patents.
He received his Ph.D. in Material Science and Engineering, Univeristy of California Berkeley

Broadband Light Management Using Low-Q Whispering Gallery Modes in Spherical Nanoshells

Sunday, August 5th, 2012

 

August 21, 2012 Noon-1PM
Texas Instruments Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive. Santa Clara, CA

 

 

 

TITLE: Broadband light management using low-Q whispering gallery modes in spherical nanoshells

SPEAKER: Jie Yao, Post-doctoral Researcher, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford

 

ABSTRACT:

Light trapping across a wide band of frequencies is important for applications such as solar cells and photodetectors. Here, we demonstrate a new approach to light management by forming whispering-gallery resonant modes inside a spherical nanoshell structure. The geometry of the structure gives rise to a low quality-factor, facilitating the coupling of light into the resonant modes and substantial enhancement of the light path in the active material, thus dramatically improving absorption. Using nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) as a model system, we observe broadband absorption enhancement across a large range of incident angles. The absorption of a single layer of 50-nm-thick spherical nanoshells is equivalent to a 1-μm-thick planar nc-Si film. This light-trapping structure could enable the manufacturing of high-throughput ultra-thin film absorbers in a variety of material systems that demand shorter deposition time, less material usage and transferability to flexible substrates.

SPEAKER BIO:

Dr. Jie Yao is a Post-doctoral Researcher in the Materials Science and Engineering Department at Stanford University. He works within the group of Professor Yi Cui which investigates a broad range of nanoscale properties including electronic, photonic, electrochemical, mechanical, catalytic and interfacial properties. His research interests include light management for energy conversion, material optical property tuning, metamaterials and optical nano-cavities. He has demonstrated non-resonant negative refraction in metamaterials, which is a milestone in the exploration of transformational optics. He also designed and demonstrated the world’s smallest three-dimensional indefinite optical cavities. He completed his PhD at UC Berkeley, his MS at the University of Southern California and BS at Nanjing University, China.

AGENDA: Registration & light lunch 11:30am. Presentation & Q/A 12:00 to 1pm

COST: IEEE Members and Students $5. Non-Members $10

 

 

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Energy Materials with Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy

Tuesday, July 17th, 2012

 

July 17, 2012 Noon-1PM
Texas Instruments Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive. Santa Clara, CA

 

 

 

TITLE:
Nanoscale Chemical Imaging of Energy Materials with Full-field Transmission X-ray Microscopy

SPEAKER:
Dr. Joy C. Andrews, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

ABSTRACT:

Correlation of chemistry and morphology in hierarchical functional materials such as battery electrodes, fuel cells and catalysts can drive design of more efficient materials. Full-field nanoscale chemical imaging has been used to collect single-pixel XANES (~1E6 spectra per energy stack; acquired in minutes) at down to 30 nm resolution. The full-field transmission X-ray microscope (TXM) on beam line 6-2 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource combines large field of view (tens to hundreds of microns) with high resolution imaging from ~4.5 to 14 keV (ΔE/E < 1E-4), for XANES chemical speciation. Custom software (TXM Wizard; available free for public use) is used to produce chemical and morphological maps of various composite systems in 2D and 3D. In situ and ex situ results from full-field XANES microscopy of Li-ion battery electrodes and other catalytic materials, rendering insight into performance and structure, will be presented.

SPEAKER BIO:

Dr. Joy C. Andrews is a Staff Scientist, Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource, SLAC. She performs interdisciplinary research in nanoscience on energy-related materials, correlating nanostructure and chemical state ex situ, in situ and in operando, for improvement of performance and uptake and transformation of metals and nanoparticles in environmental samples. She also studies speciation of heavy metals using X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS), scanning x-ray fluorescence and full field hard x-ray transmission microscopy as well as other methods. At SLAC, she leads the development of spectroscopic imaging, and in situ imaging of energy materials and catalytic systems. She obtained her PhD from the University of California Berkeley. Prior to SLAC, she was a full professor at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, CSU East Bay, CA and is currently the Professor Emeritus.

Implementing Smell and Taste with Nano-sensors

Tuesday, January 24th, 2012

January 24, 2012 Noon-1PM
Texas Instruments Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive. Santa Clara, CA

TITLE: Implementing Smell and Taste with Nano-sensors

SPEAKER: Zhiyong Li / HP Labs

ABSTRACT:

The well-being of people and a safe, secure and sustainable world around them demand ultra-sensitive “smell and taste” equivalent sensory to connect the physical world and people through innovative technologies. Inexpensive and real-time detection, identification and even quantification of the trace amount of unusual molecules, in the water you drink, in the food you eat, in the air you breathe, or even disease indicator in your body, will be an indispensible part of the future world. I will describe a novel nanosensor platform that can lead to molecular sensing with high performance, and ease of use, in a palm-size system, at a low cost. The technology is based on rationally designed nanoplasmonic structures to reveal the unique fingerprint of a molecule, also widely known as Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). I will show the demonstration of such technology for food contaminant detection, and illustrate the potential for applications ranging from food safety, water and environmental monitoring, anti-counterfeiting, drug discovery and quality assurance, homeland security, healthcare needs and other emerging markets.

SPEAKER BIO:

Dr. Zhiyong Li is the Principle Investigator of SERS project jointly funded by DARPA and HP. Dr. Li leads a team of world-class researchers to develop nanosensors that will define the physical limit of the sensitivity and enable the future implementation of smell and taste sensory for environmental, health, food, homeland security, and safety monitoring applications. His team is part of the big bet research at HP labs with the vision to deploy billions or even trillions of inexpensive, ultrasensitive sensor nodes around the earth, also known as Central Nervous System for the Earth (CeNSE). Dr. Li joined HP since 2001 and pioneered the nanosensor research at HP Labs. Dr. Li graduated with a PhD degree in Chemistry from University of Notre Dame, 2001, a MS degree in Inorganic Materials from Chinese Academy of Science, 1996, and a BS degree in Chemistry from University of Science and Technology of China, 1993. He has published more than 60 peer-reviewed journal articles, and has more than 40 US patents granted.

PRESENTATION: 2012-Jan-Zhiyong_Li-IEEE_talk_012412-ForPosting.PDF