SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE
  • IEEE San Francisco Bay Area Nanotechnology Council is the nanotechnology leader for the IEEE's San Francisco / Oakland Eastbay / Santa Clara Valley Joint Section.

    Regular events include a monthly lunch presentation (typically the 3rd Tuesday) and annual symposiums.

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Archive for the ‘Past Events’ Category

Nanophosphors in Cancer Diagnosis, Therapeutics and Drug Delivery

Friday, February 21st, 2014

RavilisettyTuesday March 18, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map


 


 

TITLE: Nanophosphors in Cancer Diagnosis, Therapeutics and Drug Delivery

SPEAKER: Dr. P. R. Ravilisetty, President Specialty Phosphors Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Mammography is considered to be the best tool for the detection of breast cancer, and high-resolution images can detect cancer more accurately than other systems, particularly with computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems. Current digital mammography systems use needle shape CsI:Tl phosphor pixels <100 μm in size. The stability and life span of these phosphor needles are limited due to their hygroscopic and fragile nature. Our approach to avoid current limitations in digital mammography is to grow micron-size pillars of very stable scintillator materials using novel nanophosphors.

Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is currently used clinically where a photosensitizer such as Photofrin is activated with laser light to produce oxygen radicals that kill cancer cells. Visible light only penetrates few millimeters into tissue. IR light penetrates much deeper, but does not activate photo sensitizers. Upconverting phosphors (UCPs) absorb infrared photons and emit visible photons. Due to low conversion efficiency, UCPs do not deliver enough visible light. X-ray excitable nanophosphors are good candidates to deliver higher flux visible light to sensitize PDT drug. Currently, we are investigating the possibility of adopting inorganic nanophosphors as a biological contrast agent for medical imaging in X-ray/optical combo. We are also working on X-ray luminescence computed tomography (XLCT), a new molecular imaging modality with medical research groups at Stanford University. This combined modality may yield an increase in the utility of omnipresent X-ray imaging by enabling concurrent molecular imaging. Nanophosphors with magnetic properties are being explored at SPI in drug delivery.

Nanophosphors synthesis, characterization, and possibilities of using in early detection of breast cancer, X-ray PDT, medical imaging in a combined X-ray/optical instrument and drug delivery will be presented.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Ravilisetty is a President of Specialty Phosphors Inc., a startup company dedicated to development and manufacturing of nanophosphors for medical, display, lighting and security applications. Dr. Ravilisetty spent five years in CECRI (Government Lab.), India developing optically stimulated dosimetry and color TV phosphors. At Panasonic Plasma Display Lab, he spent more than 12 years developing novel, highly efficient, and small size particle phosphors for plasma display panels (PDP). He continued his development of phosphors at Sarnoff Research Institute (SRI) International for display and lighting applications. During his 35 years career, Dr. Ravilisetty published his research and development findings extensively as journal publications (96), books (2), & patents (19) He is Fellow/Senior/active member of SID, IEEE, Luminescence Soc of India, ISI, etc. He obtained his Ph. D. degree in Materials Science from Indian Institute of Technology.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

Nano-Justified: Why Nano Matters for Silicon Thermoelectrics

Thursday, January 30th, 2014

Akram_Boukai_300x370Tuesday February 18, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map


 


 

TITLE: Nano-Justified: Why Nano Matters for Silicon Thermoelectrics

SPEAKER: Akram Boukai, CEO and Co-Founder, Silicium Energy

ABSTRACT:
Nano has been an overhyped buzz word for more than a decade and yet it’s difficult to point to a product that benefits from the nanoscale. The field of thermoelectrics, however, benefits tremendously from nanostructuring due to dissimilar length scales between heat and electron transport. Silicon in particular has very different length scales for heat and electron transport. Recently, silicon based thermoelectric devices that utilize a finely tuned nanostructure have delivered high performance in the lab. This discovery culminated in the formation of Silicium Energy in 2011 with funding from Khosla Ventures. Silicium Energy is developing next-generation thermoelectric devices with unprecedented performance designed to revolutionize markets for waste heat recovery and refrigeration. Silicium’s platform has the potential to achieve high ZT across a wide range of temperatures at low cost. Silicium leverages technology created at Caltech and the University of Michigan, which utilizes a “fab-less” approach for high performance thermoelectrics using off the shelf silicon wafers.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Akram Boukai obtained his PhD from the California Institute of Technology in 2008. His research focused on the thermoelectric properties of nanostructured silicon where he produced and measured high efficiency thermoelectrics. He then went on to become an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan in the Materials Science and Engineering Department. There his group made a breakthrough in the manufacture of nanostructured silicon thermoelectrics, which resulted in the formation of a Khosla Ventures funded startup, Silicium Energy. Akram now serves full-time as the co-founder and CEO of Silicium Energy and is continuing his dream of taking his laboratory discovery on silicon thermoelectrics to market.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

Searching for Profits at the Intersection of Nanotech and Electronics

Tuesday, December 17th, 2013

kozarsky_200x200Tuesday January 28, 2014
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map


 


 

TITLE: Searching for Profits at the Intersection of Nanotech and Electronics

SPEAKER: Ross Kozarsky, Senior Analyst, Lux Research Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Despite massive media attention and investments, nanotechnology has yet to live up to the hype, and many are still confused as to the best context for examining “nano” for the purpose of business-minded analyses. Rather than regarding nano as its own industry, it is best considered an enabling technology that fits into and enhances the value chains of already existing industries. The nanotechnology value chain – namely, the distinction between nanomaterials, nanointermediates, and nano-enabled products – is a very useful tool for conducting such an analysis. After a discussion of this value chain, this presentation will review some of Lux’s key tools for assessing both a company’s technical value and business execution. It will then explore key electronics application spaces of nanotechnology – including transparent conductive films, conductive composites, imaging, and in vitro diagnostics – which will serve as case studies for solidifying common themes of what it takes to be successful as a nanotech developer.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Ross Kozarsky is a Senior Analyst who leads Lux Research’s Advanced Materials team. Ross’ primary responsibilities include providing strategic advice and on-going intelligence for emerging coating, composite, metal, and platform materials that serve as enabling technologies for new markets and applications in industries ranging from oil and gas to electronics. He has advised a wide array of entities from large multinational corporations to investment firms to government agencies on strategic innovation decisions in domains such as transportation lightweighting, energy security, and nanotechnology. Beyond his research engagements, Ross has presented at conferences in Asia, Europe, and North America on topics ranging from carbon fiber composites to 3D printing.

Prior to joining Lux Research, Ross worked as a chemical engineer at the Silicon Valley solar startup Solexant, developing flexible thin film photovoltaic cells using printable nanomaterial technologies.

Ross holds a Master’s degree in Advanced Chemical Engineering from the University of Cambridge and a B.S.E in Chemical Engineering from Princeton University, with certificates in Materials Science and Finance. He has research experience on a wide range of topics including photovoltaic device fabrication and characterization, thin film deposition and processing, sol-gel nanomaterial synthesis, piezoelectric sensors, microfluidic devices, and the electrochemical detection of hydrogen. Ross’ ongoing education includes extension courses at University of California (Berkeley) in Financial Accounting and Princeton University alumni courses on healthcare reform and America’s post-recession economy.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10

 

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Conductive-bridge memory (CBRAM) with excellent high-temperature retention and tolerance to high levels of Gamma Radiation

Friday, November 22nd, 2013

gopinathTuesday December 17, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map


 


 

TITLE: Conductive-bridge memory (CBRAM) with excellent high-temperature retention and tolerance to high levels of Gamma Radiation

SPEAKER: Dr. Venkatesh P. Gopinath, V.P. of CBRAM Technology at Adesto Technologies

ABSTRACT:
Development activities in resistive memories have undergone explosive growth in the past several years. Conductive-Bridge RAM (CBRAM) is a family of resistive memory that offers significant advantages of performance, cost, scaling and power as compared to today’s non-volatile memory technologies. While several implementations of RRAM technology have demonstrated excellent potential as next generation memory technology, the barriers to achieve commercial success remain rooted in overcoming process integration challenges as well as market and application requirements. Further, reliability and functional requirements for memory products vary depending on the end application for which they will be utilized.
This talk will focus on a family of fully CMOS integrated CBRAM technology that not only shows excellent performance and power advantages over today’s technologies but also demonstrates excellent high temperature (>200ºC) retention and tolerance to very high levels (5Mrad) of Gamma radiation. These features allow CBRAM to replace conventional NVM technology for traditional applications as well as solutions for operations under harsh operating conditions like automotive, medical (sterilization) and space applications.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Venkatesh (“P.G.”) Gopinath is the V.P. of CBRAM Technology at Adesto Technologies. His responsibilities include R&D and transferof CBRAM technologyto volume manufacturing. He has over 17 years of industry experience working on discrete and embedded memory technologies.He has held technical and managerial roles at LSI Logic, Sun Microsystems and Innovative Silicon. P.G.’s industrial experiences cover development and commercialization of conventional CMOS technologies as well as floating gate FLASH and floating body memory cells.He has over 30 granted patents and publications in various areas of semiconductor manufacturing.P.G. has a Ph. D. in Electrical Engineering from Michigan State Universityand an MBA from Santa Clara University.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

Fall Symposium: Nanoengineered Biomedical Devices

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

Tuesday November 19, 2013
8:30 AM – 4:15 PM
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

 

The IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Ninth Annual Fall Symposium:
Nanoengineered Biomedical Devices

Join colleagues from industry and academia to learn from speakers at the frontier of nanotechnology enabled medical devices, diagnostics, and medical research.

AGENDA
08:30 AM — Registration & Networking
09:10 AM — Welcome – Dr. Geetha R. Dholakia

09:15 AM — KEYNOTE
Prof. David Deamer, Biomolecular Engineering UC Santa Cruz
Nanopore Analysis of Nucleic Acids: From an Idea to a Working Instrument

09:55 AM — Coffee Break

10:05 AM — SESSION 1 – Diagnostics
Dr. Mehdi Javanmard, Senior Research Engineer, Stanford Genome Technology Center
Ultrasensitive Electrofluidic Technologies for Point-of-Care Diagnostics

Dr. Tom Peyser, Vice President, Science and Technology, Dexcom
The Dexcom G4 PLATINUM: Ten Years of Progress in Commercialization of Glucose Monitoring Systems

Dr. Adam Seger, Electrical Engineer, MagArray, Inc. Post-doctoral Researcher UC Santa Cruz
Magnetic nano-sensors for sensitive protein detection

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12:05 PM — LUNCH and Poster Session

01:20 PM — SESSION 2 – Nanoscale Tools for Biology
Prof. Erkin Seker, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, UC Davis.
Gold foams for biomedical devices.

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Prof. Demir Akin, Deputy Dir, Ctr for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence. Stanford School of Medicine.
Cancer Nanotechnology: Opportunities and Challenge

02:40 PM — Break – Refreshments

02:55 PM — SESSION 3 – Nanomaterials
Dr. Dominik Ziegler, Researcher, Molecular Foundry, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Scuba Dive to the Nanoscale: New Probes for Low-Noise Mass and Force Sensing in Liquids

Prof. Tao Ye, School of Natural Sciences, UC Merced
Nanoscience Tools for Positioning, Measuring, and Activating Individual Biomolecules

04:15 PM — ADJOURN

 

University Mini-Symposium: Energy Generation & Storage: Possibilities and Realities

Wednesday, September 18th, 2013

Saturday November 9, 2013
12:30 pm – 5 pm
Stanford University
350 Serra Mall, Packard 101
Stanford, CA 94305

 

Energy Generation & Storage: Possibilities and Realities
The 2nd Annual University Mini-Symposium
Sponsored by
IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council & Stanford Energy Club

Join colleagues from industry and academia to learn from speakers at the frontier of energy storage materials and devices followed by a networking reception.

SPEAKER / TOPICS:

Dr. Daniel Hirleman, Dean, School of Engineering, University of California, Merced
Opportunities for collaborative university – industry research for sustainable energy

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Dr. Yi Cui, Associate Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
Designing & fabricating nanostructured materials for energy storage and generation

Dr. Latika Menon, Associate Professor, Department of Physics, Northeastern University
Development of nanomaterials for energy related applications

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J. R. Gaines, Technical Director, Kurt J. Lesker Company
Revolutionary thin film micro-batteries – creating new products and markets

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Craig Jacobsen, Co-founder and CEO/CFO, Point Source Power, Inc.
Nanoparticle enabled super electrodes for solid oxide fuel cells
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Students $5 (refundable at the door with on-line registration receipt)
IEEE Members: $25, Non-members:$35, Unemployed: $15
Includes reception.

 

Conducting Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) at Statistically Relevant Scale for Rapid Assessment of Non-Volatile Memory Materials and Devices

Tuesday, September 17th, 2013

Kumar VirwarniTuesday October 15, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map


 


 

TITLE: Conducting Atomic Force Microscopy (C-AFM) at Statistically Relevant Scale for Rapid Assessment of Non-Volatile Memory Materials and Devices

SPEAKER: Dr. Kumar Virwani, Research Staff Member at the IBM Almaden Research Center

ABSTRACT:
Over the past few years we have investigated applications of Mixed-Ionic-Electronic–Conduction (MIEC) materials as access devices for various non-volatile memory candidates, including Resistive RAM (RRAM). In this talk we describe the role of conducting atomic force microscopy in the discovery of new mixed ionic electronic conductors, and in the optimization and monitoring of fabrication processes for both MIEC and RRAM devices. For more on Storage Class Memory at Almaden see this project page.

C-AFM measurements on MIEC and RRAM devices yield fast, reliable and statistically relevant information that can be applied towards the optimization of materials, electrodes, anneal conditions and a host of other parameters relevant for ultimate device performance. From an instrumentation perspective, we show how thousands of I-V (current vs. voltage) measurements can be both repeatable and reliable. We describe how to overcome C-AFM challenges such as set-up inconsistency, non-repeatable I-V performance, probe life and lack of large statistics.

Establishment of short-loop fabrication procedures allow devices to be delivered for C-AFM testing rapidly, allowing quick turnaround in the assessment of myriad processing choices. Yet by validating an exact subset of the full fabrication procedure needed for fully integrated devices, such short-loop devices also provide for maximal efficiency in yield learning. One-to-one correlations between data from automated probe testing and C-AFM measurements, and unique fabrication knowledge and extensive device scaling data obtained via C-AFM will be presented.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Kumar Virwani is a Research Staff Member at the IBM Almaden Research Center in San Jose, California. He obtained Bachelor of Engineering (BE) degree from the University of Mumbai, India and MS and PhD degrees (in 2007) from the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville, USA. Dr. Virwani joined IBM Almaden Research Center in 2008 where his research activities include application of electrical SPM techniques to analyze mixed ionic electronic conduction materials and devices, non-volatile memory materials, nanoindentation of low-k dielectrics and Auger spectroscopy. Prior to joining IBM he worked at Bruker Nano (formerly Veeco Instruments) on various aspects of scanning probe microscopy.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

Thermal Management At The Extremes

Wednesday, September 11th, 2013

goodson_200x200Tuesday September 17, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map


 

TITLE: Thermal Management At The Extremes

SPEAKER: Ken Goodson, Professor & Department Chair, Stanford University, Mechanical Engineering

ABSTRACT:
The semiconductor industry is pushing many technological boundaries, and this motivates thermal management research at extreme lengthscales, timescales, and power densities. At Stanford we are grappling with several related questions: Are there thermal scaling limits for nanotransistors below 10 nm? What exotic cooling methods are needed for highly integrated 3D chips and power electronics? Can we convert waste heat to electrical power for appliances, sensor arrays, and efficient vehicles?

This talk covers these challenges and describes the rapidly evolving thermal management toolset from picosecond lasers and submicron infrared imaging to Monte Carlo simulations that is helping to sort them out. The talk also highlights the enormous help we receive from semiconductor companies, in particular here in Silicon Valley.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Ken Goodson is Professor and Department Chair of Mechanical Engineering at Stanford. His lab (nanoheat.stanford.edu) has graduated 40 PhDs including twelve professors from MIT and Stanford to UC Berkeley and numerous engineering staff at high-tech companies. Goodson studied at MIT (BS89, PhD93) and has co-authored 32 US patents, 170 archival journal articles, and 210 conference papers. Goodson is a Fellow with ASME and IEEE. Recognition includes the ASME Kraus Medal, the 2013 THERMI Award, plenary lectures at INTERPACK, ITHERM, PHONONS, SEMITHERM, and THERMINIC, and best/outstanding paper awards at SEMITHERM, ITHERM, and the IEDM. Goodson co-founded Cooligy, which built microfluidic cooling systems for computers (including the Apple G5) and was acquired by Emerson in 2006.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

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Co-sponsored Event: Semiconducting Nanowire Arrays Grown Directly on Graphene: Towards Precision Placement of Wafer Scale Nanowire Arrays with Improved Electrical Contact for Energy Storage and Harvesting

Monday, September 9th, 2013

CPMTThe IEEE SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council is please to be a co-sponsor of:

“Semiconducting Nanowire Arrays Grown Directly on Graphene: Towards Precision Placement of Wafer Scale Nanowire Arrays with Improved Electrical Contact for Energy Storage and Harvesting” John Alper, PhD Candidate, UC-Berkeley

Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Optional Buffet Dinner starts at 6 PM
Presentation starts at 6:45 PM

For more details or to register please see the IEEE Santa Clara Valley CPMT Society Chapter’s event page.

 

A Multiview Backlight for Mobile 3D Displays

Tuesday, July 16th, 2013

HP Labs team members (L to R): David Fattal - Principal Scientist, Sonny Vo - post-doc, Zhen Peng - Principal Scientist

HP Labs team members (L to R): David Fattal – Principal Scientist, Sonny Vo – post-doc, Zhen Peng – Principal Scientist

Tuesday August 20, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

TITLE: A Multiview Backlight for Mobile 3D Displays

SPEAKER: Dr. Zhen Peng, Research Scientist, HP Laboratories

ABSTRACT:
Multiview three-dimensional (3D) displays can project the correct perspectives of a 3D image in many spatial directions simultaneously. They provide a 3D stereoscopic experience to many viewers at the same time with full motion parallax and do not require special glasses or eye tracking. None of the leading multiview 3D solutions is particularly well suited to mobile devices (watches, mobile phones or tablets), which require the combination of a thin, portable form factor, a high spatial resolution and a wide full-parallax view zone (for short viewing distance from potentially steep angles). Our technology relies on the external modulation of a multidirectional backlight that allows the projection of independent images in hundreds of different spatial directions, allowing any number of viewers to experience the 3D stereo effect without the need for glasses and with a continuous sense of motion parallax in a very wide view zone, at an observation distance of up to a meter. The key to our design is a guided-wave illumination technique based on light-emitting diodes that produces wide-angle multiview images in color from a thin planar transparent lightguide. To illustrate the capabilities of this technology, we use simple ink masks or a high resolution commercial liquid-crystal display unit to demonstrate passive and active (30 frames per second) modulation of a 64-view backlight, producing 3D images with a spatial resolution of 88 pixels per inch and full-motion parallax in an unprecedented view zone of 90 degrees. We also present several transparent hand-held prototypes showing animated sequences of up to six different 200-view images at a resolution of 127 pixels per inch. The resulting display is power efficient, ultra-compact, low-cost and optionally transparent.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Zhen Peng is a Research Scientist at HP Laboratories in Palo Alto, California. His current research interests include mobile 3D display, nanophotonics and its novel applications in human life. He received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southern California in 2007, and a B.S. in Electronic Engineering from Tsinghua University, China, in 2001. He has authored and coauthored over 40 journal and conference papers, including a recent cover article in Nature.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10