SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

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Archive for the ‘Past Events’ Category

September 19th, 2017: Company Origin Stories – Exploring Entrepreneurship

Sunday, September 10th, 2017

Company Origin Stories – Exploring Entrepreneurship
Nanotech company founders explain how and why they started their enterprises
Register: Here

Tues Sept 19 – 5:30 PM to 9:15 PM
Cost: $17 – includes dinner – discounts for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed

Location: Texas Instruments Building E Conference Center
2900 Semiconductor Dr., Santa Clara, CA 95052
See the TI Building location map and directions

Presenting Companies include:

View Dynamic Glass – Architectural “smart glass” using electrochromism from nano-scale layers of metal oxides. Raised $650M and has completed installation at several hundred sites. Read More

Nano Precision Medical – Subdermal implants using nano-structured membranes to provide long-term therapeutics for the treatment of chronic diseases. Read More

 

Fibralign – Biomedical devices based on artificial nano-structured collagen. Read More

August 15th 2017: 2D Materials Advantages and Challenges Towards Applications

Saturday, July 29th, 2017

TITLE: 2D Materials Advantages and Challenges Towards Applications

SPEAKER:

Ching-Hua (Fiona) Wang, PhD. Student

Electrical Engineering Department, Stanford University

Tuesday, August 15, 2017  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm

Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA  map

Cost $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed. Please register here.

ABSTRACT:

Two-dimensional (2D) materials present unique opportunities for next generation ultra-thin electronics. However, practical 2D devices can only be realized after overcoming key challenges: contact resistance, stable doping, and uniform growth.
In this talk I will highlight the recent research our group has implemented to improve contact and doping in BP and MoS2 transistors.   I will then show our work beyond transistor applications using 2D materials, such as graphene-Cu interconnects and hBN-RRAM, that are promising for three-dimensional integrated electronics.

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: $6, discount for IEEE Members, Students & Unemployed.

Materials Studies of New High Efficiency Solar Absorbers

Monday, March 21st, 2016

TITLE: Materials Studies of New High Efficiency Perovskite Solar Absorbers

SPEAKER: Dr. Mike Toney, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory & Stanford UniversityDr.Mike Toney

Tuesday, April 19th, 2016  11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE ($5 donation requested). Please register here.

Cosponsored by IEEE Santa Clara Valley Photovoltaic Section and IEEE Santa Clara Valley Photonics Society

ABSTRACT:

Organic-inorganic halide perovskite films (e.g., methylammonium lead iodide  xrd3 or CH3NH3PbI3) were first employed as light absorbing layers in photovoltaic (PV) devices in 2009, and produced relatively modest power conversion efficiencies (PCEs) of 3.8%.Since then, the development of perovskite solar cells has been meteoric, with PCEs increasing from 3.8% to over 21% in just over five years.

The combination of high extinction coefficients, long charge carrier diffusion lengths and compatibility with low cost, solution-based fabrication processes gives these materials enormous commercial potential.

A significant appeal of CH3NH3PbI3 is their facile synthesis using solution processes. Typically a low temperature anneal (about 100 °C) is involved in film synthesis with subsequent cooling through the cubic-to-tetragonal phase transition near 65 °C. Since the transition temperature is within the range expected in real world device applications, it is therefore important to understand the structural behavior at this transition and its impact on the device performance.

In order to better understand this phase transition in CH3NH3PbI3 thin films, we have developed the capability for operando synchrotron X-ray diffraction by designing a sample stage for simultaneous, temperature dependent measurement of J-V curves and diffraction. This has allowed us to obtain X-ray diffraction data during the operation of CH3NH3PbI3 devices.

 Here I will present detailed structural characterization of the perovskite crystal structure with increasing temperature, including the tetragonal lattice distortion, octahedral rotations associated with the room temperature tetragonal phase, and thermal (disorder) parameters. The impact of these structural changes on the device J-V characteristics will be described and we comment on potential implications for material and device properties.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:

Michael Toney is head of the Materials Sciences Division and a distinguished staff scientist at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL), part of the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He is a pioneer in the use of X-ray diffraction and small angle scattering for the determination of molecular and mesoscale structure of organic and polymeric thin films and for the determination of atomic structure of electrode-electrolyte interfaces. Toney received his BS from Caltech in 1979 and his PhD from the University of Washington in 1983, both in physics. He spend one year as a postdoc at the Risoe National Lab (now DTU) in Denmark, where he participated in some of the first surface X-ray diffraction experiments. He then began working at IBM Almaden Research in materials sciences. He left IBM in 2003 to join SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford, where he starting programs in sustainable energy materials.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.

Bringing Better Pixels to UHD with Quantum Dots

Thursday, November 19th, 2015

 

Tuesday, December 15, 2015 151215 Charlie Hotz Nanosys Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

This seminar is being cosponsored by the Santa Clara Valley Chapter of the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society.

 

TITLE: Bringing Better Pixels to UHD with Quantum Dots
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SPEAKER: Dr. Charlie Hotz, Vice President of R&D, Nanosys

 

 

ABSTRACT:
Advances in Quantum Dot chemistry and synthesis have made them an ideal emitter for backlight units in LCDs, with over 25 retail SKUs using Quantum Dots now available ranging from 7” tablet size up to 85” TV size. The next wave of technology innovation in displays is upon us now with Ultra-High Definition, whose most well-known benefit is an increase in resolution from HD to 4K, but there is much more to this new broadcast specification. High dynamic range (HDR) and wide color gamut (WCG) bring more perceptible benefits to users in terms of an improved viewing experience than improved resolution alone.
The ultra-high color gamut standard adopted for UHD broadcast, known as Rec. 2020, was originally defined for laser-based projectors where the color primaries are on the color locus of the CIE diagram. Due to the deeply saturated color coordinates, Rec. 2020 is beyond the capabilities of OLEDs and conventional LED backlit LCDs. So is the Rec. 2020 color standard reachable for consumer displays or is it only for high-end laser-based projection systems? This presentation will explore the capability of using quantum dots in LCDs to reach the ultra-high color gamut of Rec. 2020.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Charlie Hotz sets the vision for Nanosys’ design, invention of new products and development of existing products. Dr. Hotz has been with Nanosys for 2 years and has developed the company’s large-scale QD synthesis processes and equipment, including working with all the regulatory bodies such as the EPA and local jurisdictions.

Prior to Nanosys, Dr. Hotz was Vice President, R&D for 6 years at Solexant, a QD based photovoltaics company where he develop the first ever high efficiency QD solar cells.  Dr. Hotz also served as Vice President of R&D for 7 years at Quantum Dot Corporation, where he developed many QD products for diagnostic and biological applications which are still in use today at Thermo-Fischer, who acquired Quantum Dot Corporation.  Charlie has a Ph.D. in Chemistry from Michigan.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

Please RSVP here by Monday December 14 at 5PM.

November 17 Half-Day Fall Symposium: Biomimetic Nanotechnology

Wednesday, October 21st, 2015

Join us for our 11th Annual Half Day Fall Symposium on Biomimetic Nanotechnology

Tuesday Nov 17, 2015
Registration opens: 12:00 PM
Conference: 1:00 PM – 4:30 PM
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

biomimetic-banner

Everywhere in nature, nanoscale features enable macro-scale phenomena.
• How is it that geckos can cling to smooth vertical surfaces and never lose their grip?
• What makes butterfly wings iridescent?
• How do chameleons change their hue?
• What keeps lily pads dry in a rainstorm?
The answer is specialized nanostructures!
Come on Nov. 17 and learn about fascinating examples of biomimicry on the nanoscale.

The symposium will also provide a forum for networking and the exchange of information among local academics, students, scientists, engineers, early stage venture capitalists and entrepreneurs who share an interest in nanotechnology and its biomimetic applications.

Speakers Panel

Biomimicry-speakers

Nanostructured Interfaces for Therapeutic Delivery–Tejal Desai, UC San Francisco

Lessons from Brain Connectivity for Next Gen 3D NanoICs–Jan Rabaey, UC Berkeley

Nanopore Sequencing of DNA Comes of Age–Hugh Olsen and Miten Jain, UC Santa Cruz

A Chameleon-Inspired Stretchable Electronic Skin–Ho-Hsiu Chou, Stanford University

There will also be a student poster session displaying student research in nanotechnology.

Fees (online registration):
IEEE Members: $25
Non-IEEE Members: $35
Unemployed/Between Jobs: $20
Students (with ID): $15
Save $5 with early registration — by November 10th
Add $10 for Registration at the door

Please register here.
Also, visit our Meetup Group.

Agenda:

12:00 Registration Begins
12:30 Networking and Lunch
1:00 Symposium begins

Emerging Non-volatile Memory, enabled by Carbon Nano-materials

Tuesday, August 18th, 2015

Tuesday, September 15, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

TITLE: Emerging Non-volatile Memory, enabled by Carbon Nano-materials
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SPEAKER: Dr. Ethan C. Ahn, Dept of Electrical Engineering, Stanford Nanoelectronics Lab
 

ABSTRACT:
With the advent of so-called ‘big data’ era and the increasing need for greater storage capacity in various mobile and wearable devices, it is becoming more important to explore a new storage-class memory technology. As illustrated in recent research articles and papers, significant progress on emerging non-volatile memory (NVM) devices such as spin-transfer-torque magnetic random access memory (STT-MRAM), resistive or metal-oxide RAM (RRAM), or phase-change memory (PCM), made it possible to replace the mainstream NVM (NAND Flash) and even reach certain on-chip memory requirements (e.g., L2/L3 SRAM cache). This is important, as the energy efficiency of computing circuits/systems has been increasingly limited by the memory and storage devices. In this talk, a frontier research on the near- and long- term potential of emerging nanoscale memory devices and architectures will be discussed to replace ultimately scaled CMOS memory device technologies. The emerging 1TnR (one-transistor-n-resistors) array architecture with carbon nanotube field-effect transistor as one-dimensional selection device and thus reduced sneak leakage is demonstrated as a cost-effective and 3D-stackable solution. The integrated bipolar RRAM device, for example, exhibits self-compliance characteristics with high endurance and fast switching speed. It is pointed out that the carbon nanotube electrode brings the (lithography-free) critical dimension of the memory device down to a single-digit-nanometer. The novel thermal engineering technique for low-power NVM applications is also introduced using a monolayer graphene as an interfacial thermal barrier. The programming (RESET) current of the graphene-inserted PCM device is reduced by about 40% due to an improved thermal efficiency. The status, key challenges, and promising applications of the RRAM, PCM, and STT-MRAM technologies will be briefly discussed in the talk.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Ahn received the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering (EE) at Stanford University in 2015, working under the supervision of Professor H.-S. Philip Wong. He joined Stanford University in 2010, after a 3-year research career on Spintronic devices (STT-MRAM) with the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) in Seoul, Korea. While at KIST, he initiated the collaborative research program with Michigan State University to study spin-dependent transports in magnetic multilayers and spinvalves. He received the B.S. and M.S. degrees in EE from the Korean Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) in Daejeon, Korea. He is the author of over 10 peer-reviewed research journal papers in electrical engineering and applied physics, over 20 premier international conference papers, and one book chapter of Emerging Nanoelectronic Devices (ed. A. Chen, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd, Jan. 2015). His primary research interests include emerging non-volatile memory devices and architectures (including Metal-oxide RAM and Phase-Change Memory), beyond CMOS electronics (utilizing Carbon Nano-materials such as Carbon Nanotube and graphene), and various spintronic devices (including STT-MRAM and Spin-FET). Dr. Ahn has been the recipient of numerous awards and honors, including John Bardeen Student Research Award for Excellence in Nanodevice Research (2014), Best Summer Research Intern Award by T.-C. Chen at IBM T. J. Watson (2013), and GE Scholarships (2004).

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 

Please RSVP here to make sure we have enough lunch.

Electrostatic Functionalization of Carbon Based Nanomaterials and Applications in Chemical, Gas and BioSensing

Tuesday, July 21st, 2015

Tuesday, August 18, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Please RSVP here.

 

 

TITLE: Electrostatic Functionalization of Carbon Based Nanomaterials
and Applications in Chemical, Gas and BioSensing

SPEAKER: Dr. Vasuda Bhatia, Professor, Amity Institute
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanomaterials based sensors have attracted a great deal
of research interest in last several years. Their unique electrical, optical and mechanical properties make them
very strong candidates for the development of the new generation of miniaturized, lowpower and highperformance
sensors. In this talk, I present a novel technology based on electrostatic charging for the functionalization of carbon based nanomaterials. The electrostatically functionalized surfaces provide oxygenated functional groups as anchoring sites for decoration with several nanoparticles to synthesize nanocarbon nanoparticles composites. Using selfassembled thermal embedding technique, thin films have been fabricated for the detection of chemical molecules as well as enzyme free detection of biomolecules.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Vasuda Bhatia is a professor at Amity Institute of Renewable and Alternative Energy and Amity Institute of Advanced Research and Studies, Amity University, India. She received her B.Tech. (Bachelors of Technology) in Materials and Metallurgical Engineering from Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur, India in 1995, MS in Materials Science from the University of Cincinnati in 1997 and the Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Texas A&M University in 2001. She was research scientist at Stellar Micro Devices, Austin, Texas; visiting faculty at IIT
Kanpur, India and research associate at Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Bangalore, India. Her research interests include synthesis, characterization and device applications of nanomaterials; materials for renewable energy applications; field emission devices and materials and development of sensors and sensing devices for bio, chemical and gas applications.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 

Please RSVP here to make sure we have enough lunch.

Interactions of Light and Charge with Nanoporous MetalOrganic Frameworks

Tuesday, June 16th, 2015

Tuesday July 21, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

 

TITLE: Interactions of Light and Charge with Nanoporous MetalOrganic
Frameworks

SPEAKER: Dr. Mark Allendorf, Senior Scientist, Sandia National Laboratories
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
MetalOrganic Frameworks (MOFs) are a recently created class of supramolecular materials in which metal ions are coordinated to rigid organic “linker” molecules, creating a nanoporous structure with an exceptional degree of synthetic versatility. The length scales in these materials make them appealing for a variety of optoelectronic applications. However, virtually all known MOFs are insulators as a result of the largely ionic nature of the metallinker bonds, which severely limits their use in other types of electronic devices. Recently, we demonstrated a route to MOFs that become electrically conducting by introducing guest molecules into their pores (Guest@MOF). This presentation will discuss the transport of energy and charge within MOFs, illustrated by examples from our research on chemical sensing, radiation detection, light harvesting, thermoelectrics, and device fabrication. Our results suggest that Guest@MOF represents a novel class of electronic materials with the potential to bridge the properties gap between inorganic and organic conductors, providing a high degree of electronic tailorability combined with longrange order for high charge mobility.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Mark D. Allendorf is a Senior Scientist at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California and holds degrees in chemistry from Washington University in St. Louis (A.B.) and Stanford (Ph.D.). At Sandia, he leads efforts to develop the fundamental science and applications of metalorganic frameworks (MOFs) and related materials. Current research interests include chemical sensing, gas storage and separations, MOFs for electronic devices, and catalysts for biofuels production. His work has lead to over 170 publications. He is President Emeritus and Fellow of The Electrochemical Society and has received multiple awards for research, leadership, and teamwork, including a 2014 R&D100 Award for a novel approach to radiation detection.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 

An introduction to the 3D Subnanometer Compositionally Sensitive Technique of Atom Probe Tomography

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

Tuesday June 16, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

 

 

TITLE: An introduction to the 3D Subnanometer Compositionally Sensitive Technique of Atom Probe Tomography

SPEAKER: Mr. Robert Ulfig, LEAP Product Manager, Cameca SAS
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
An introduction to the 3D subnanometer compositionally sensitive technique of atom probe tomography (using the Local Electrode Atom Probe – LEAP), especially how it has been used in semiconductor applications such as silicides, shHigh-k dielectrics, Si/SiGe[B], compound semiconductors, 3D device structures, and optoelectronics. The latest techniques to target single devices with novel sample preparation techniques will be highlighted as well as the advantages for yield and data quality of the latest instrumentation, the LEAP 5000X. Time will be reserved for discussion and the potential of the technique for specific semiconductor applications.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Robert M. Ulfig joined CAMECA Instruments Inc. (Previously Imago Scientific Instruments) in 2001 after working at Advanced Micro Device’s Submicron Development Center in Sunnyvale California where he worked as a Senior Process Engineer in the Lithography and Thin Films Groups. He completed his MS in Materials Science and Engineering in 1997 where his research projects included development of a plasma source ion implantation system for semiconductor research, including work with Oak Ridge National Labs investigating implanted silicon with Atom Probe Tomography.

At CAMECA Rob initially developed the manufacturing process for the local electrode for the Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP®) systems. He also developed key sample preparation procedures, including Microtip coupons and an automated electropolishing system. During his time at CAMECA, he has worked as the Applications Lab Manager, Technical Sales Engineer, and now works as the LEAP Product Manager where he oversees the customer training program, works to develop new applications with customers, and integrates the activities and requests from customers into the latest and greatest of CAMECA software and hardware.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 

11th Annual Full Day Symposium – Nanophotonics

Sunday, April 5th, 2015

IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council Chapter 11th Annual Full Day Symposium

“The Promise and Progress of Nanophotonics”

An International Year of Light event co-sponsored by IEEE SCV Photonics and EDS Chapters

May 19, 2015 8:30AM – 4:30PM

Texas Instruments Auditorium, Santa Clara CA map

 

Nanophotonics relates to nanostructures and materials which facilitate the generation, propagation, manipulation, and detection of light. This symposium will showcase the breadth of the exciting work being done in the Bay Area and beyond to reveal the promise of uniquely nanotechnology-enabled effects. It will also provide a forum for networking and exchange of information among local academics, engineers, early-stage venture capitalists and entrepreneurs who are moving nanophotonics into disruptive applications.
 

Silicon Photonics at Intel
– Dr. Andrew Alduino, Director, Silicon-Photonics Product Line Management, Intel Corporation
 
Silicon Photonics and the Datacenter

– Dr. Marco Fiorentino, Researcher, System Research Lab, HP Labs
 
Semiconductor Nanowire Nanophotonics and Optoelectronics
– Dr. Mark Brongersma, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
 
Carbon Nanotube Infrared and Terahertz Photodetectors
– Dr. François Léonard, Researcher, Sandia National Laboratories, Livermore
 
Visualizing Chemical Reactions and Light-Matter Interactions with Nanometer-scale Resolution
– Dr. Jen Dionne, Professor, Materials Science and Engineering, Stanford University
 
Mapping Optoelectronic Processes at the Native Length Scale in Organic & Inorganic Nano Composites
– Dr. Alexander Weber-Bargioni, Staff Scientist, Molecular Foundry Material Science Division LBNL
 
Quantum Noise in All-Optical Logic Circuits
– Dr. Charles Santori, Researcher, HP Labs
 
Nanoscale Optofluidics: On-Chip Infectious Disease and Cancer Diagnostics
– Dr. Ahmet Ali Yanik, Professor of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Santa Cruz
 
Implement Smell and Taste with Nano-sensors
– Dr. Zhiyong Li, Principal Scientist, Foundational Technology Lab at HP Labs
 
Poster Presentations: work by students from local colleges and universities

Lunch and coffee/tea breaks are included.

On-line registration by May 16: https://www.123signup.com/register?id=yrskj
Fees:
   $20 Students with ID
   $30 Life Member/Between employment
   $40 Member
   $50 Non-member

>> Add $10 if you prefer pay-at-event attendance.
Please pre-register for pay-at-event attendance: