SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE

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12th Annual Full Day Symposium

Wednesday, April 27th, 2016

IEEE SFBA Nanotechnology Council Chapter 12th Annual Full Day Symposium

“Nanotechnology in Biosystems, Medicine and Health”

May 17, 2016 8:30AM – 5:45 PM

Texas Instruments Conference Center, Bldg. E-1, 2900 Semiconductor Drive, Santa Clara, CA map

Register here

Nanomedicine in the 21st Century

Prof. Folarin Erogbogbo, Biomedical Engineering, San Jose State University, and Conference Chair

Building micro/nano interfaces to cells and organisms

Prof. Michel M. Maharbiz, Electrical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley

Nanoscale devices as smart biomaterials for surface-cell interactions

Prof. Nicolas A. Melosh, Materials Science, Stanford University

Nanoweave – Proprietary Scaffold for Tissue Engineering

Mr. Greg King, CEO, Fibralign

Cancer Nanotechnology : Opportunities and Challenges

Prof. Demir Akin, Deputy Director, Center for Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, Stanford University

Enabling Safe, Effective and Non-Viral Genetic Nanomedicine

Mr. Andre Watson, Founder, Ligandal

Nanodiamonds for sentinel lymph node mapping

Dr. Ambika Bumb, CEO and Founder, Bikanta

Nanodiamonds for Neuroimaging

Prof. Abraham Wolcott, Physical Chemistry, San Jose State University

Theranostic nanoparticles

Prof. Zhen Cheng, Director of the Cancer Molecular Imaging Lab, Stanford School of Medicine

Also: Student Poster Sessions and Networking

Register here

Sponsors

        http://www.7men.nl/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/IBM-banner.jpg               emblogo

Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging – the Quest For a Molecular Structure Microscope

Thursday, February 18th, 2016

Tuesday, March 15th, 2016 Mamin enhanced 11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

TITLE: Nanoscale Magnetic Resonance Imaging- the Quest for a Molecular Structure Microscope
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SPEAKER: Dr. John Mamin, IBM

Cosponsored by the Santa Clara Valley Chapter of the IEEE Engineering in Medicine and Biology Society
ABSTRACT:
Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has had a huge impact in the biomedical field, with its ability to image the body non-destructively in three dimensions. A number of groups around the world are working to develop nanoMRI, applying the principles of MRI to perform three dimensional microscopy, with the ultimate goal of imaging individual biological molecules such as protein. Because nuclear magnetism is such a weak effect, any such technique will require a magnetic sensor that is both extremely sensitive and nanometer scale. In the past our group has used ultrasensitive force detection to sense the minute forces (~10-18 N) between a magnetic tip and small ensembles of hydrogen nuclei. More recently, we have explored the use of nitrogen vacancy centers in diamond as quantum magnetometers for detecting nuclear magnetic resonance. I will describe both recent progress and the considerable challenges that lay ahead.

 

Mamin abstract enhanced

 

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
John Mamin graduated from Stanford with a B.S. in physics and did his Ph.D. and postdoc in physics at UC Berkeley, working in superconductivity and the then emerging field of scanning tunneling microscopy. He has been a Research Staff Member at IBM ever since, working in areas ranging from magnetic force microscopy to probe- based data storage to pushing the limits of force detection. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society, and co-recipient of the 2009 Cozzarelli and the 2011 Gunther Laukien Prize for work in nanoscale magnetic resonance.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE, but a $5 donation is requested to help cover the cost of lunch

Please register here.

Also, visit our Meetup Group.

Nanoscale Chemical Imaging with Photo-induced Force Microscopy

Wednesday, January 20th, 2016


Tom Albrecht PSTuesday, February 16, 2016 

11:30 AM – 1:00  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE. Please register here.

TITLE: Nanoscale Chemical Imaging with Photo-induced Force Microscopy
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SPEAKER: Dr. Tom Albrecht, Molecular Vista, Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Infrared Photo-induced Force Microscopy (IR PiFM) is based on an atomic force microscopy (AFM) platform that is coupled to a widely tunable mid-IR laser.  PiFM measures the dipole induced at or near the surface of a sample by an excitation light source by detecting the dipole-dipole force that exists between the induced dipole in the sample and the mirror image dipole in the metallic AFM tip.  This interaction is strongly affected by the optical absorption spectrum of the sample, thereby providing a significant spectral contrast mechanism which can be used to differentiate between chemical species.  Due to its AFM heritage, PiFM acquires both the topography and spectral images concurrently and naturally provides information on the relationship between local chemistry and topology.  Due to the steep dipole-dipole force dependence on the tip-sample gap distance, PiFM spectral images have spatial resolution approaching  the topographic resolution of AFM,  demonstrating sub 10 nm spatial resolution on a variety of samples.

The capabilities of PiFM are highlighted by studies on various self-assembled block copolymer systems.  The results consist of PiFM spectral images associated with several absorption bands of different polymeric blocks along with broad spectra associated with nano-spots on sample surfaces.   Images of fingerprint patterns and parallel lamellae (prepared via directed self-assembly) for both poly (styrene-b-methyl methacrylate) and poly (styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine) show clear spectral contrast between the two blocks of each material system.  For poly (styrene-b-2-vinylpyridine), PiFM contrast between blocks was far greater than is generally available by scanning electron microscopy without staining.  By enabling imaging at the nm-scale with chemical specificity, PiFM provides a powerful new analytical method for deepening our understanding of nanomaterials and facilitating technological applications of such materials.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Thomas Albrecht received a B.A. in physics from Carleton College in 1985 and a Ph.D. in applied physics from Stanford University in 1989.  His thesis work on atomic force microscopy (AFM) included the first microfabricated cantilevers for AFM and the first demonstration of atomic resolution by AFM.  After completing graduate school, Tom worked briefly for Park Scientific Instruments to transfer the fabrication process for microcantilevers and to help develop Park’s first AFM product.

In 1989, Tom joined the IBM Almaden Research Center (San Jose, CA) where his contributions included frequency modulation detection for AFM, and a variety of contributions to magnetic recording technology, such as a track following servo system that became the industry standard for tape drives, load/unload technology for disk drives, and the “Microdrive” – a tiny 1-inch drive that was used in consumer electronics devices such as the Apple iPod Mini.  From 2002 to 2004, Tom worked on assignment at the IBM Zurich Research lab (Switzerland), where he contributed to and briefly managed the “Millipede” micromechanical data storage project.

In 2004, Tom joined Hitachi Global Storage Technologies (HGST, San Jose) where he led the company’s patterned media research team for 10 years.  The patterned media project involved an ambitious combination of nanofabrication technologies, including e-beam, self-assembly, double patterning, and nanoimprint lithography.  In 2013, he was named an HGST Fellow for lifetime contributions to the magnetic data storage industry.

In 2015, Tom joined Molecular Vista (San Jose) to bring to market a promising new technology combining AFM with optical spectroscopy to provide chemical imaging with nanometer-scale spatial resolution.

Tom has 148 issued U.S. patents and numerous publications.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

Please register here.
Also, visit our Meetup Group.

Imaging at Very Short Wavelengths Using Nanotechnology

Sunday, December 20th, 2015

Anne SakdinawatTuesday, January 19, 2016 
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE. Please register here.

 

TITLE: Imaging at Very Short Wavelengths Using Nanotechnology

 

SPEAKER: Dr. Anne Sakdinawat, SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory

 

ABSTRACT:
The field of X-ray imaging has not only contributed to a wide range of basic sciences, but also many industries, such as medical imaging, non-destructive testing, and security. Due to the ability to image through thick objects with high resolution and in some cases, with elemental identification and femtosecond time resolution, x-ray imaging in biological, chemical, and physical sciences is a very powerful tool. Examples of this include tomography of whole unstained cells, in-situ nanoscale imaging of battery components with elemental specificity, and imaging of magnetic domains. While sophisticated x-ray instrumentation has been developed for use with synchrotron radiation, translation to lab-based use still remains a challenge. A major goal in x-ray imaging is to be able to develop new lab-based technologies with improved imaging capabilities that currently exist at synchrotrons.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Anne Sakdinawat is currently a scientist at SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory where she serves as a group leader in x-ray optics and imaging. Her research interests include the development of new x-ray imaging, optics, nanofabrication techniques and translational research for biomedical and materials applications. She received her doctorate in bioengineering from the University of California at Berkeley and San Francisco and has received the Werner Meyer-Ilse Award for Excellence in X-ray Microscopy and the Department of Energy Early Career Award.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

Please register here.
Also, visit our Meetup Group.

Graphene: The magic material of this century

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2015

Tuesday, October 20, 2015
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

Admission FREE, RSVP here by Monday October 19 at 5PM.

 

TITLE: Graphene: The magic material of this century
 
SPEAKER: Dr. Ashok K. Kapoor, Vice President, Silicon Valley operations of PhotonIC Corp
 

 

 
ABSTRACT:
This talk will cover the promise of graphene in various fields starting with semiconductor devices and extending to photonics, energy storage, various sensors and MEMS, and biomedical applications. Graphene was first synthesized in a laboratory in 2003 by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov in the University of Manchester and theseresearchers won a Nobel prize for their work in 2010. The market for graphene has been growing very rapidly, havingreached $9M in 2014. This talk will cover the material properties of graphene which make it special and explore some of the applications going beyond the typical transistors.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Ashok K. Kapoor received the B.Tech. degree in electrical engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT), Kanpur, India, in 1973, and the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH, in 1979 and 1981, respectively. He started his career working for the Fairchild Research Center, PaloAlto, CA, as a Member of the Research Staff. Later, he worked for Hewlett Packard integrated circuit research group, at LSI LOGIC where he managed the Device Technology Group which included device modeling, TCAD, and device reliability and also managed the testing laboratory and at National Semiconductor Corp as the Director of Research. Since 2001, he has cofounded multiple startups, including Sensitron to develop systems based on wireless networked sensor, SemiSolutions which worked on leakage reduction in nanoscale MOS transistors and in, 2005, he cofounded DSM Solutions to develop complementary JFET technology for lowpower VLSI, and worked as the Chief Technology Officer. In 2011, he joined APIC/Photonic Corp to head the Silicon Valley Operations, working on integration of photonic with CMOS as the founder of the Silicon Valley Operations of the company.Also, he manages the technical collaboration with Universities for the company. He was deeply involved with the research consortium SRC in various capacities during early 1990s, as a Member of the Executive Technical Advisory Board from 1992to 1996. In 1995, he was elected as the CoChair of the Executive Technical Advisor Board of the SRC where he helped set direction of the research funding . He was also a Member of the SIA Roadmap Committee from its initiation until 1997. He has coauthored over 30 publications and is listed as an inventor or coinventor of over 100 U.S. patents. He was the recipient of the Inventor of the Year Award from LSI Logic in 1995. Dr. Kapoor is a member of the IEEE Electron Devices Society, photonic society, Optical Society of America, Material Research Society, and Sigma Xi. His current research is centered onhigh performance silicon photonics.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm – Adjourn
COST: FREE

 
Please RSVP here by Monday October 19 at 5PM.