SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council

IEEE
  • IEEE San Francisco Bay Area Nanotechnology Council is the nanotechnology leader for the IEEE's San Francisco / Oakland Eastbay / Santa Clara Valley Joint Section.

    Regular events include a monthly lunch presentation (typically the 3rd Tuesday) and annual symposiums.

  • Mailing list

CPMTThe IEEE SF Bay Area Nanotechnology Council is please to be a co-sponsor of:

“Semiconducting Nanowire Arrays Grown Directly on Graphene: Towards Precision Placement of Wafer Scale Nanowire Arrays with Improved Electrical Contact for Energy Storage and Harvesting” John Alper, PhD Candidate, UC-Berkeley

Wednesday, September 11, 2013
Optional Buffet Dinner starts at 6 PM
Presentation starts at 6:45 PM

For more details or to register please see the IEEE Santa Clara Valley CPMT Society Chapter’s event page.

 


HP Labs team members (L to R): David Fattal - Principal Scientist, Sonny Vo - post-doc, Zhen Peng - Principal Scientist

HP Labs team members (L to R): David Fattal – Principal Scientist, Sonny Vo – post-doc, Zhen Peng – Principal Scientist

Tuesday August 20, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

TITLE: A Multiview Backlight for Mobile 3D Displays

SPEAKER: Dr. Zhen Peng, Research Scientist, HP Laboratories

ABSTRACT:
Multiview three-dimensional (3D) displays can project the correct perspectives of a 3D image in many spatial directions simultaneously. They provide a 3D stereoscopic experience to many viewers at the same time with full motion parallax and do not require special glasses or eye tracking. None of the leading multiview 3D solutions is particularly well suited to mobile devices (watches, mobile phones or tablets), which require the combination of a thin, portable form factor, a high spatial resolution and a wide full-parallax view zone (for short viewing distance from potentially steep angles). Our technology relies on the external modulation of a multidirectional backlight that allows the projection of independent images in hundreds of different spatial directions, allowing any number of viewers to experience the 3D stereo effect without the need for glasses and with a continuous sense of motion parallax in a very wide view zone, at an observation distance of up to a meter. The key to our design is a guided-wave illumination technique based on light-emitting diodes that produces wide-angle multiview images in color from a thin planar transparent lightguide. To illustrate the capabilities of this technology, we use simple ink masks or a high resolution commercial liquid-crystal display unit to demonstrate passive and active (30 frames per second) modulation of a 64-view backlight, producing 3D images with a spatial resolution of 88 pixels per inch and full-motion parallax in an unprecedented view zone of 90 degrees. We also present several transparent hand-held prototypes showing animated sequences of up to six different 200-view images at a resolution of 127 pixels per inch. The resulting display is power efficient, ultra-compact, low-cost and optionally transparent.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Zhen Peng is a Research Scientist at HP Laboratories in Palo Alto, California. His current research interests include mobile 3D display, nanophotonics and its novel applications in human life. He received his Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Southern California in 2007, and a B.S. in Electronic Engineering from Tsinghua University, China, in 2001. He has authored and coauthored over 40 journal and conference papers, including a recent cover article in Nature.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 


jiye leeTuesday July 9, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

TITLE: Splitting One Photon to Two Electrons: Toward Breaking the Single Junction Efficiency Limit

SPEAKER: Dr. Jiye Lee, Postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Foundry at LBNL

 

ABSTRACT:
Conventional solar cells generate one electron for each absorbed photon. Any excess photon energy above the bandgap is wasted as heat. This fundamental energy loss imposes the Shockley-Queisser limit of 34% for single optimized semiconductor junction. Singlet fission, a nanoscale process in organic molecules, splits a high-energy molecular excitation into a pair of low-energy ones. In solar cells, it promises to double the electricity generated from the blue part of the sunlight, breaking the single junction efficiency limit.

I will present fission-based photovoltaic cells that produce more than one electron per photon. This is the first time that any solar cell has shown the peak photon-to-electron conversion efficiency exceeding 100% in the visible spectrum. To further advance fission-enhanced solar cell nanotechnology, it is crucial to understand the fundamental mechanism governing singlet fission. I will report on a universal mechanism that predicts the rate of singlet fission and confirm that fission is robust to variations in molecular nano-morphology.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Jiye Lee is currently a postdoctoral fellow in the Molecular Foundry at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. She received her PhD in electrical engineering from MIT. Her PhD thesis won the Microsystems Technology Laboratories Doctoral Dissertation Seminar at MIT. She obtained her B.S. in electrical engineering from KAIST in South Korea in 2006. She spent a summer in 2011 at Palo Alto Research Center.Her research interests are optoelectronics and photovoltaics based on nanomaterials, including organic molecules.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 


Nobuhiko P. KobayashiTuesday June 18, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA
map

TITLE: Energy Harvesting from Waste Heat and Sun Light with Mesoscopic Materials

SPEAKER: Prof. Nobuhiko P. Kobayashi, Dept. of Electrical Engineering, UC Santa Cruz

 

ABSTRACT:
Designing solid-state devices is essentially restricted by choosing available chemical elements found on the Periodic Table and forming various stable solids made of these chemical elements. A key to developing novel solid-state devices is, therefore to find a route to combine a variety of such solids often physically and/or chemically incompatible each other to benefit from resulting combined material platforms. In this talk, specific examples of “Mesoscopic Materials” will be presented with the view toward solid-state devices for energy harvesting from waste heat and sun light. The talk is divided into the following two sections.
1. Semiconductor nanocomposites for energy harvesting from waste heat: thermoelectric.
2. Metal oxide thin films for high-power solar energy collection and transmission: Sun to fiber.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Nobuhiko “Nobby” P. Kobayashi is a professor at the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) and the Science Director of Advanced Studies Laboratories, a strategic partnership between UCSC and NASA Ames Research Center. Current research projects include synthesis and characterization of nanometer-scale materials and devices with emphasis on solid-state energy conversion funded by DARPA, ONR, NSF, NASA, DOE, SRC, and ARPA-E. Prior to joining UCSC in 2008, Prof. Kobayashi was involved in developing electronic materials for memristive devices to build memories and logics required for future computing systems at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories. He also led semiconductor nanowire photonics for optical interconnect necessary for advanced computing systems. Prior to Hewlett-Packard Laboratories, Prof. Kobayashi worked at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, where he was involved in developing semiconductor materials for both ultra-high speed diagnosis systems required for the National Ignition Facility and the optical code division multiple access funded by DARPA. From 1999 to 2001, Prof. Kobayashi was at Agilent Laboratories, developing light emitting diodes, vertical cavity surface emitting lasers, and hetero bipolar transistors for ultra-wide band fiber-optics and high-speed wireless communications. Prof. Kobayashi earned his M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in materials science from University of Southern California in 1994 and 1998.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 


Please join us our 9th Annual Full Day Symposium:

Emerging Nano-Bio & Nano-Ionic Technologies and Applications

May 15, 2013
8:00 am – 4:30 pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

Please download detailed agenda.

Links in presentation titles download slides provided by the speakers for distribution.

Presentations include:

Keynote
Dr. Chandrasekhar Narayan, Dir. Science and Technology, IBM Almaden Labs

Session 1: Non-volatile Memory I

  • Dr. Rene Meyer, Rambus Labs: “Tunnel RRAM Devices”

  • Dr. Geoffrey Burr, Research Staff Member, IBM Almaden Labs: “Access devices for 3-D crosspoint using Mixed-Ionic-Electronic-Conduction ”

Session 2: Non-volatile Memory II

Session 3: Nano Bio-Med

  • Mark Bunger, Research Director, Lux Research: “Nanoionics in Medicine: from modest beginnings to potentially bright future”

  • Prof. Anand Gadre, Director, Stem Cell Instrumentation Foundry, UC Merced: “Applications of Polymeric Micro/Nano-Electro-MEMS in Biotechnology”
  • Dr. Rob Meagley, Founder ONE Nanotechnologies: “Creating Chemoselective Surfaces and Films for Sensor Platforms”

Session 4: Nano Materials

  • Dr. Jessica Koehne, Nano-bio sensing systems Scientist at NASA Ames: “Carbon Nanofiber Nanoelectrode Arrays for Biosensing Applications”

  • Dr. Boaz Vilozny, Bioengineering Dept UC Santa Cruz: “Applications Surface Modification of Glass Nanopores for Bioanalytical Sensing”
  • Jon Myers, CEO and Founder, Graphene Technologies: “Reversing the Greenhouse – Carbon Dioxide to Graphene Devices”

Brad_AitchisonApril 16, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

TITLE: Turning ALD Innovations into Successful Applications

SPEAKER: Brad Aitchison, Western US Sales Director, BeneQ Oy, Vantaa Finland

 

ABSTRACT:
Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) has a myriad of applications including buffer layers, diffusion barriers, dielectrics for use in optics, electronics, medical, defense and a large number of other areas. ALD film thickness is independent of substrate geometry and can form uniform films on deep trenches, nano-structures, and 3D parts. It can form nanolaminates with sharp boundaries as well as nanoscale layers with graded composition . This talk will address the fundamentals of ALD processing including ALD on particles with a Fluidized Bed Reactor (FBR), as well as show how ALD is enabling new nanotechnology possibilities and novel materials and applications along with the already established applications in solar cells, OLED displays, flexible electronics, battery electrodes, decorative coatings, moisture barriers and anti-tarnish coatings, etc.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Since mid 2012 Brad Aitchison has been Western US Sales Director for Beneq, a leading supplier of production and research equipment for thin film ALD and aerosol coatings, and a manufacturer of thin film electroluminescent (TFEL) displays. During the four years leading up to joining Beneq he was a Director of Engineering at Canatu, a leading edge nanotechnology company commercializing carbon nanomaterial thin films for the electronics, optics and energy sectors. Prior to that he contributed in Process Engineering roles for 18 years at Watkins-Johnson, ASM-Microchemistry, Planar Systems, and MLD Technologies. Brad received his BA in Physics at Willamette University, and an MS in Material Science Engineering at UCLA.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn

gu. claireMarch 19, 2013
Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

 
TITLE: Fiber SERS Sensors for Molecular Detection

SPEAKER: Dr. Claire Gu, Department of Electrical Engineering
University of California, Santa Cruz

 

ABSTRACT:
Optical fibers have been successfully used in long-haul communication systems, endoscopy, and other optical systems to transmit optical power as well as information. In integrated sensor systems, optical fibers have been frequently employed to connect the source and the detector, due to their flexibility, compactness, and low loss. However, optical fibers can provide more functionalities than a simple transmission channel.

In this talk, we review our work on various optical fibers as platforms for molecular sensing based on surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The fibers serve to significantly increase the sensitivity of SERS and to facilitate the integration of a compact sensor system. Specifically, three types of fiber SERS probes have been able to enhance the sensitivity of detection beyond that of direct detection: 1) liquid core photonic crystal fiber (LCPCF), 2) tip-coated multimode fiber (TCMMF) in conjunction with a second SERS substrate mixed with the analyte solution, and 3) nanopillar array fabricated on the tip of a multimode fiber. Integration of such fiber probes with a portable Raman spectrometer brings the SERS detection one step closer to practical applications. In this talk, we will discuss the principle of operation of various building blocks, demonstrate our recent results, and highlight some potential applications.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Claire Gu received her Ph.D. in Physics from Caltech in 1989. Then she worked as a member of the technical staff at Rockwell Science Center, and went to Penn State in 1992 as an assistant professor. In 1997, she came to UC Santa Cruz as the first Electrical Engineering faculty member, and is now a professor in EE. Her research interests include fiber optics, holographic data storage, liquid crystal displays, nonlinear optics, and optical information processing; with a current emphasis on fiber sensors using SERS (surface enhanced Raman scattering). She has published more than 200 journal and conference papers in these areas. In addition, she has co-authored a text/reference book on “Optics of Liquid Crystal Displays”, and co-edited two technical books on photorefractive nonlinear optics and applications. She received a National Science Foundation Young Investigator Award in 1993. From 2000 to 2006, she served as a Topical Editor of Optics Letters. She is a fellow of OSA (Optical Society of America) and SPIE (The International Society of Optical Engineering).

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

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February 19, 2013 Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

 
TITLE: CMOS Compatible Nanoscale Vacuum Tube

SPEAKER: Dr. Jin-Woo Han, Research Scientist, NASA AMES Research Center

 

ABSTRACT:
Vacuum tubes had been the major workhorse in electronics before the commercial silicon transistor emerged in 1960’s. The vacuum tube performs rectifying and amplifying functions by utilizing the electrons movement through a free space. However, the vacuum tube is hard to integrate, heavy, fragile, and energy consuming. The solid-state transistor overcame these limitations because it is easy to integrate, light, reliable, and energy efficient. Compared to the vacuum tube, however, the transistor has low gain and is sensitive to noise and distortion as the carriers travel through silicon lattices. Therefore, the vacuum tubes are still used in a premier sound systems and baseband broadcasting stations.

A nanometer scale vacuum tube can provide the advantages of both vacuum tube and transistor. The nano vacuum tube can be fabricated and integrated with semiconductor process technology, providing compactness as well as high performance. Furthermore, while transistor operation in extreme conditions such as high temperature and radiation are problematic, the nano vacuum tube can operate well in these environments since it uses a vacuum channel. This implies that the nano vacuum tube might be exploited even for automobile and space applications. In this talk, the nanoscale vacuum transistor will be discussed.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Jin-Woo Han is a Research Scientist at NASA Ames Research Center, California, where he is developing beyond-CMOS devices such as exploratory transistor/memory, THz devices, and sensors. His research experience includes overall research and development aspects from design, simulation, layout, process integration, fabrication, characterization, and modeling on multiple-gate MOSFET and unified memory devices. Currently, he is developing nanoscale vacuum channel transistors, paper electronic devices, and sensors for electronic nose.

He received IEEE EDS Early Career Award in 2012, Ames Honor Award from NASA in 2012, Best Dissertation Award from KAIST in 2010, and Gold Prize at Samsung humantech paper award from Samsung electronics in 2006. He authored or coauthored one book chapter, 60 peer-reviewed journal papers, and 30 conferences proceeding papers. He holds 14 patents.

He received the Ph. D. degree with highest honor from KAIST, Korea, in 2010.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

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January 15, 2013 Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

 

TITLE: Commercializing Nanoelectronics: Opportunities in Material and Life Sciences

SPEAKER: Mark Bunger, Research Director, Lux Research Inc.

ABSTRACT:
Printed electronics promises the ability to manufacture devices through low-cost, high-throughput manufacturing with novel materials and inks. Three materials areas – opaque conductive inks and pastes, transparent conductors, and semiconductors — present a total opportunity of nearly $3 billion in 2017. Opaque conductive inks are a leading segment, with medical and RFID among the fastest-growing applications; ITO replacement transparent conductive films will come from a single application: smartphone touch screens. In healthcare, this presentation will assess emerging sensor, treatment, and electrode technologies across eight markets to uncover business opportunities for printed, flexible, and organic electronics.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Mark Bünger is a Research Director at Lux Research. Based in the firm’s San Francisco office, Mark currently leads the Alternative Fuels, Bio-based Materials and Chemicals and Targeted Delivery practices. He joined Lux Research with 14 years of business strategy experience, both as a management consultant and technology analyst. Previously, Mark was a Principal Analyst at Forrester Research, an International Engagement Manager at European consultancy Icon Medialab, and a Managing Director of Icon Medialab’s U.S. office. The first six years of Mark’s career were spent at Accenture in the U.S., U.K., and Sweden.
Mark’s education includes International Marketing at Mälardalen Polytechnic in Sweden, and Market Research at the University of Texas in the U.S. He also studied biochemistry through the University of California at Berkeley’s extension program and currently works in the Center for Quantitiatve Biology at the University of California, San Francisco.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10


 

Presentations slides are available on Lux Research’s website


 


 


December 4, 2012 Noon – 1  pm
Texas Instruments (TI) Auditorium E-1
2900 Semiconductor Drive
Santa Clara, CA

 

TITLE: Atomistic aspects of the resistive switching characteristics in RRAM devices

SPEAKER: Blanka Magyari-Köpe, Senior Research Engineer, EE Department, Stanford

ABSTRACT:
Recently, numerous experimental and theoretical investigations are undertaken in academia as well as various product-oriented efforts are going on in industry for resistives witching memory. The rapid rise in publications for RRAM have mostly dealt with resistive switching mechanism, electronic conduction mechanisms for both “ON” and “OFF” state, formation and annihilation of conductive paths, and addressing scalability, retention and endurance issues. Perhaps still the major “unknown” is how we can reach clearer understanding of resistive switching mechanism by a rigorous physics based modeling which can serve for materials and structural optimization of RRAM cell, followed by selection devices and memory array configurations. This talk will discuss (1) progress made for switching mechanisms for resistive switching in terms of “ON” and “OFF” state formation energies, which has implications to switching power scaling coupled with retention characteristics, (2) physical mechanism of the “ON” conduction by using ab-initio simulation techniques which delineate the role of oxygen vacancies in forming a conductive filament in transition metal oxides, (3) investigation of various metal electrodes and dopants effects, to assess the scalability and endurance in terms of programming power reduction as well as variability improvement and retention characteristics.

SPEAKER BIOGRAPHY:
Blanka Magyari-Köpe received her Ph.D. degree in physics from the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, Sweden, in 2003. Since 2006, she has been an engineering Research Associate and from 2011 a Senior Research Engineer in the Department of Electrical Engineering at Stanford University. Prior to this position she was a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles.
Her research interests include adapting and applying high-precision, accurate and efficient quantum mechanical modeling to real applications. She had been working on the analysis and fundamental understanding of electronic properties of novel and technologically relevant materials, i.e., perovskites, metal alloys, hydrogen storage materials, metal gate/high-k MOS structures and RRAM device materials. Currently, she is involved in projects that involve understanding the RRAM switching mechanism and the role and control of nanointerfaces between metallic, insulating, and semiconducting materials, seeking solutions for how to design and manipulate them at the atomic level to achieve increased performance in electronic devices.. She has given over 24 invited talks and has published more than 40 scientific papers.

AGENDA:

  • 11:30 am – Registration & light lunch (pizza & drinks)
  • Noon – Presentation & Questions/Answers
  • 1:00 pm - Adjourn
COST: IEEE Members: $5, Non-members:$10