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Archive for the ‘EMBS Chapter’ Category

EMBS Chapter Seminar

Thursday, May 12th, 2011

Title:

Trends in Optical Coherence Tomography

Date:

Monday, May 16th, 2011 at 11:00 AM

Location:

E2 – 350 EITC, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Prof. Adrian Podoleanu
Professor of Biomedical Optics
Head of the Applied Optics Group
School of Physical Sciences,
University of Kent, Canterbury
United Kingdom

Abstract:

The number of publications in optical coherence tomography (OCT) has doubled in the last 3 years. Traditionally applied to imaging the eye, OCT is now being extended to fields outside ophthalmology and optometry. This explains one of the reasons of rapid OCT developments in recent years. A second reason is the increase in the acquisition speed by more than 100 times in the last 5 years, mainly due to progress in the technology of fast tuneable lasers. Widening its applicability, progress in the core engine of the technology, and impact on development of novel optical sources, make OCT a very active and rapidly evolving field. Principles of time domain and spectral domain OCT technologies will be presented comparatively and how their advantages and disadvantages shaped the range of their specific diagnostic applications. The review will conclude with current research on combination of time domain and spectral domain OCT methods and how Talbot bands can be used to eliminate ghost images in Fourier domain OCT.

Bio:

Professor Adrian Podoleanu’s research interests focus on methods and devices for optical coherence tomography (OCT). He contributed towards development of the en-face OCT imaging as a novel technology to complement the more conventional longitudinal OCT imaging and has generated simultaneously, OCT and confocal images of the retina. He is co-author of 6 chapters in books on OCT, of over 130 peer reviewed journal papers, of more than 200 conference proceedings and of 21 patents (9 awarded). He is one of the topical editors of the Applied Optics for the Biomedical Optics division. He was awarded a Leverhulme Trust Research Fellowship in 2004, the prize of the Ambassador of Romania to the UK in 2009 and an European Research Council Advanced fellowship in 2010 to support a team of 3 postdocs and 2 PhDs to advance combinations of time domain and spectral domain interferometry.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Sherif S. Sherif at 474-6893.

EMBS Chapter Seminar

Tuesday, March 8th, 2011

2011_03_10_embs

Title:

Respiratory Sound Analysis for Flow Estimation During Wakefulness and Sleep, and Its Applications for Sleep Apnea Detection and Monitoring

Date:

Thursday, March 10th, 2011 at 4:00 PM

Location:

E2 – 361 EITC, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Dr. Azadeh Yadollahi

Abstract:

Tracheal respiratory sounds analysis has been investigated as a non–invasive method to estimate respiratory flow and upper airway obstruction. However, the flow–sound relationship is highly variable among subjects which makes it challenging to estimate flow in general applications. Therefore, a robust model for acoustical flow estimation in a large group of individuals did not exist before. On the other hand, a major application of acoustical flow estimation is to detect flow limitations in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during sleep. However, previously the flow–sound relationship was only investigated during wakefulness among healthy individuals. Therefore, it was necessary to examine the flow–sound relationship during sleep in OSA patients.

This thesis takes the above challenges and offers innovative solutions. First, a modified linear flow–sound model was proposed to estimate respiratory flow from tracheal sounds. To remove the individual based calibration process, the statistical correlation between the model parameters and anthropometric features of 93 healthy volunteers was investigated. The results show that gender, height and smoking are the most significant factors that affect the model parameters. Hence, a general acoustical flow estimation model was proposed for people with similar height and gender.

Second, flow–sound relationship during sleep and wakefulness was studied among 13 OSA patients. The results show that during sleep and wakefulness, flow–sound relationship follows a power law, but with different parameters. Therefore, for acoustical flow estimation during sleep, the model parameters should be extracted from sleep data to have small errors. The results confirm reliability of the acoustical flow estimation for investigating flow variations during both sleep and wakefulness.

Finally, a new method for sleep apnea detection and monitoring was developed, which only requires recording the tracheal sounds and the blood’s oxygen saturation level (SaO2) data. It automatically classifies the sound segments into breath, snore and noise. A weighted average of features extracted from sound segments and SaO2 signal was used to detect apnea and hypopnea events. The performance of the proposed approach was evaluated on the data of 66 patients. The results show high correlation (0.96, p < 0.0001) between the outcomes of our system and those of the polysomnography. Also, sensitivity and specificity of the proposed method in differentiating simple snorers from OSA patients were found to be more than 91%. These results are superior or comparable with the existing comercialized sleep apnea portable monitors.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Zahra Moussavi at 474-7023.

EMBS Chapter Seminar

Tuesday, November 23rd, 2010

2010_11_25_emb

Title:

Improved Quality of Life through better Artificial Joints

Date:

Thursday, November 25th, 2010 at 3:00 PM

Location:

E2 – 365 EITC, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Prof. Urs Wyss, Ph.D., P. Eng.
Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering
Concordia Hip and Knee Institute
University of Manitoba

Abstract:

Musculoskeletal diseases are often associated with severe pain and can limit mobility. It will prevent patients from many types of exercise and sport, and often impairs their ability to work. Artificial hip, knee and other joints are being implanted in the tens of thousands every year in Canada to treat musculoskeletal diseases in order to improve the quality of life of patients. Most of these artificial joints perform very well for many years, but around 15% of the patients will have required revision surgery 15 years after implantation. Younger and more active patients are being treated with artificial joints, which is why it is important to continue to improve the long-term survival of well functioning artificial joints.

A few examples of clinical problems that the presenter had to work on will be discussed, to show the type of problems that can reduce the long-term survivorship of artificial joints. A better understanding of the kinematics and kinetics of important activities of daily living (ADL) will lead to further improvements of the function of artificial joints. The presenter will show results of ADL studies with subjects of different ethnic backgrounds.

The planned research to further improve artificial joints at the University of Manitoba and the Concordia Hip and Knee Institute will be briefly discussed.

Speaker Bio:

Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at Queen’s University until 2007 (early retirement) – the last 5 years as head of the department.

VP research for an orthopedic manufacturer 2007 – 2010.

Currently Professor in Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Manitoba.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Sherif Sherif at 474-6893.

EMBS Chapter Seminar

Thursday, August 19th, 2010

2010_08_26_embs

Title:

Resilience to aging: a neuroepidemiological perspective

Date:

Thursday, August 26th, 2010 at 3:00 PM

Location:

E2 – 361 EITC, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Dr. Caterina Rosano
Associate professor of Epidemiology
Center for Healthy Aging and Population
Graduate School of Public Health
University of Pittsburg

Abstract:

One hypothesis to explain why older people maintain high physical and cognitive function late in life is that they have a greater “brain reserve”. However, brain reserve has not been objectively quantified, as it has mostly relied on gross measures of whole-brain abnormalities that are largely
non-specific manifestation of brain aging. Additionally, the determinants and clinical outcomes of brain reserve have not been characterized systematically. I will first review our new definition of brain reserve
obtained through the application of advanced neuroimaging methods. I will then identify the main clinical outcomes of brain reserve by using longitudinal extensive data from large epidemiological cohort data.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Rosano is a physician and geriatric neuroepidemiologist. She is currently the PI of two brain MRI studies to identify the predictors of accelerated brain aging. Specifically, Dr. Rosano is developing a model to identify the determinants of cognitive and physical aging among community-dwelling older adults. Dr. Rosano has applied multimodal MRI measures of brain structural and functional integrity in longitudinal epidemiological studies of aging, including the Cardiovascular Health Study, the Gingko Evaluation Memory, the AGES-Reykjavik and the LIFEp study. By understanding the relationship between brain and physical function, Dr. Rosano hopes to identify predictors of successful aging.

Dr. Rosano has obtained an MD from the School of Medicine, Palermo, Italy,
in 1995 and an MPH at the U. of Pittsburgh in 2003. Prior to her training in neuroepidemiology, she has been a postdoctoral fellow at the Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami, where she measured the neuroregenerative
potential of the gray and white matter of the central nervous system. She subsequently joined the Neurobehavioral Research unit at the University of Pittsburgh (1999- 2001) and used brain fMRI to investigate age-related changes in brain performance and sensorimotor integration. From 2001-2004,
Dr. Rosano was a selected NIA Fellow in the Department of Epidemiology at the University of Pittsburgh while studying the epidemiology of age-related brain structural and functional impairment.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Sherif Sherif at 474-6893.

EMBS Chapter Seminar

Monday, June 7th, 2010

2010_06_10_embs

Title:

Design and Implementation of a Control System for a Humanoid Robot

Date:

Thursday, Jun 10th, 2010 at 3:30 PM – 4:30 PM

Location:

E2 – 361 EITC, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Dr. Ahmad Byagowi

Abstract:

In this presentation, the design and implementation of a control system for a humanoid robot is presented. The control system is implemented for a teen sized humanoid robot, named Archie. Project Archie started at the Institute of Handling Robots and Technology from Vienna University of Technology in the year 2004. The aim of this project is to construct a robot that can imitate human movements such as walking.

The control system is designed based on distributed computer architecture, which means that the entire control system consist of multiple individual motion control units which in turn control the joints (i.e., each joint has a motion controller) and communicate through a data network with the central controller. The central controller is designed on a system-on-chip, based on embedded systems.

In this system, an embedded processor and some peripheral hardware result a minimum system to execute a standard operating system (Real time Linux). The joint controllers of the robot face different load properties based on the overall pose of the robot. Since the design of the motion controllers are based on the load specification, tuning the motion controller parameters is a necessary task. This task can be simplified by using a simulation of the robot. The simulation will anticipate the operation of the motion controllers in the real robot. Finally, the control system of the real robot is tested and evaluated by the traversed trajectories and they are compared with the simulation of the robot. The trajectories of the real robot are taken using image processing from a video stream of the robot’s movement. The evaluation is done by comparing the simulation errors and the error obtained from the data of the real robot on the same test.

Speaker Bio:

Ahmad Byagowi received the B.S. and the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from Tehran (Iran) in 2005 and 2007 respectively. In 2007, he started the Ph.D. at Institute of Handling Robots and Technology (IHRT) from Vienna University of Technology (Austria) and in 2010 he finishes the Ph.D. degree with honor. During the Ph.D. work he was invited to the Autonomous Agent lab (AALAB) from University of Manitoba (Canada) as a visiting scholar (10 months). After getting the first Ph.D. from Vienna University of Technology, in 2010, he started the second Ph.D. in the department of electrical and computer engineering from University of Manitoba.

Dr. Byagowi has filed 4 patents, one 3rd price of innovation from Geneva in 2008 and more than 7 papers in different conferences in the field of Robotics. Besides he participated in Robocup world competition as well as IranOpen competitions from 2005 till 2009 and received the several 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in different leagues. Moreover, in 2008, he participates in FIRA EuroCup which was held between Switzerland (Zurich) and Austria (Linz) and received 1st place in Narosot league as well as 2nd place in Mirosot. In addition, Dr. Byagowi serves as part of the technical committee for several Robocup Rescue league as well as FIRA Mirosot league. During the time of being visiting scholar in the AALAB, Dr. Byagowi joined the UAV team of University of Manitoba and participates in the student competition 2009.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Sherif Sherif at 474-6893.