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Archive for the ‘Robotics and Control Chapter’ Category

Computer and Computational Intelligence Seminar

Thursday, August 11th, 2011

2011_08_25_comp

Title:

FPGAs at 28nm: Technology Challenges Facing the World’s Largest Integrated Circuits

Date:

Thursday, August 25, 2011 at 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Location:

Rm E2-365, EITC (Engineering & Information Technology Complex),
Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Vaughn Betz, PhD
Associate Professor
Department of Electrical & Computer Engineering
Toronto, ON

Abstract:

A triarchic theory of granular computing is formulated and examined in the light of the most recent research results. The three components are labeled as the philosophy, the methodology, and the computation. It offers a unified view of granular computing as a way of structured thinking, an approach of structured problem solving, and a paradigm of structured information processing, focusing on hierarchical granular structures. Based on results from well-established disciplines, including philosophy, psychology, cognitive science, education, artificial intelligence, computer programming, and many more, the triarchic framework aims at synthesizing the various studies and models into a unified theory of granular computingFPGAs are very early adopters of the latest process technology, and are amongst the world’s largest and most complex integrated circuits. For example, Altera’s 28 nm Stratix V FPGAs contain 4 billion transistors — the most ever on a non-memory integrated circuit.

This talk will describe some of the driving applications and technology trends pushing FPGAs to 28 nm and smaller process nodes. It will also highlight how FPGA architecture is evolving, as exemplified by Altera’s Stratix V FPGAs. Power management and silicon efficiency issues are pushing FPGAs to become somewhat more application-targeted, and to incorporate larger amounts of hard logic that makes them more complete systems-on-a-chip. In addition, the very high I/O bandwidth requirements of next-generation systems and new physical effects in the latest process nodes require innovation in FPGA architecture and circuit design.

Stratix V supports partial reconfiguration to increase silicon efficiency by swapping in different functionality over time. The talk will describe both the hardware that enables partial reconfiguration, and the software tools that will enable efficient design without becoming entangled in low-level physical details. Finally, it will discuss both software challenges and promising research efforts to create CAD tools that will help designers productively create the very large systems enabled by modern FPGAs.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Betz is currently an Associate Professor at the University of Toronto, with research interests in FPGA architecture and CAD.

Dr. Betz received his PhD from the University of Toronto, his MS from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and his BSc from the University of Manitoba, all in electrical engineering. Dr. Betz co-founded Right Track CAD in 1998 to commercialize the VPR CAD system he developed in his PhD. Altera acquired Right Track in 2000, and Dr. Betz became the Senior Director of Software Engineering at Altera, until he joined the University of Toronto in July 2011. He is the architect of the Quartus II place and route engine, and one of the architects of the Stratix and Cyclone FPGA families. He has published over 30 technical papers and holds 61 US patents.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Organizers:

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Witold Kinsner at 474-6490.

Computer and Computational Intelligence Seminar

Sunday, June 5th, 2011

2011_06_14_comp

Title:

A Triarchic Theory of Granular Computing

Date:

Tuesday, June 14, 2011 at 2:00 PM – 3:00 PM

Location:

E2 – 361 EITC, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Yiyu Yao, PhD
Professor
Department of Computer Science, University of Regina

Abstract:

A triarchic theory of granular computing is formulated and examined in the light of the most recent research results. The three components are labeled as the philosophy, the methodology, and the computation. It offers a unified view of granular computing as a way of structured thinking, an approach of structured problem solving, and a paradigm of structured information processing, focusing on hierarchical granular structures. Based on results from well-established disciplines, including philosophy, psychology, cognitive science, education, artificial intelligence, computer programming, and many more, the triarchic framework aims at synthesizing the various studies and models into a unified theory of granular computing.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Yiyu Yao is a professor of computer science in the Department of Computer Science, University of Regina, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. His research interests include information retrieval, rough sets, interval sets, granular computing, Web intelligence, data mining and fuzzy sets. His over 300 publications cover various topics on the foundations of data mining, modelling information retrieval system based on user preferences, information retrieval support systems, triarchic theory of granular computing, generalized rough sets and others.

He is an area editor and an editorial board member of eight international journals. He has served as a program chair of many international conferences and workshops.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Organizers:

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Witold Kinsner at 474-6490.

Canada In Space

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

2011_02_16_ece

Title:

Canada In Space

Date:

Wednesday, February 16, 2011 from 12:30 – 1:30 pm

Location:

E2-351 EITC
University of Manitoba Fort Garry Campus

Speaker:

Nicole Buckley, PhD
Chief Scientist
Canadian Space Agency (CSA)
Saint-Hubert, Quebec

Abstract:

Canada is one of world’s most active nations in space exploration. Dr. Buckley will outline many of Canada’s activities, including the ones she has been involved in during more than 10 space missions. She will also talk about career opportunities in the CSA.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Nicole Buckley is the Chief Scientist, Life Sciences and the International Space Station at the Canadian Space Agency (CSA) in Saint-Hubert, Quebec. She joined the CSA in January 2002 as Program Scientist for Space Life Sciences and She became Chief Scientist in 2004. Before joining the CSA, Nicole conducted research in microbiology in Quebec City and in San Antonio, Texas. She continues to be a strong advocate for the role of women in space, as well a champion in space education, speaking at the SpaceBio and Business of Science Symposium in Winnipeg.

Cost:

This will be a free event.

Organizers:

Contact:

For questions or more information: Dr. Witold Kinsner.

Tips for Publications and Conferences

Saturday, January 22nd, 2011

2011_01_22_tips

The IEEE Robotics and Control chapter and the Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering at the University of Manitoba identified two papers to help students and young academics improve their skills.

Successfully Presenting Your Research at Conferences and Competitions

Your research, as groundbreaking as it might be, heavily relies upon its presentation. This guide will give you a few pointers on what you can do to successfully present research papers and posters at conferences and competitions. All negative stereotypes commonly associated with engineering have become obsolete. Modern engineers are expected to develop advanced social, communication, presentation, and leadership.

A. Perez, “Successfully Presenting Your Research at Conferences and Competitions”, IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, September 2010, pp. 13-16.

Download [785KB PDF]

Surviving the Review Process

The purpose of this article is to provide some insight into the peer-review process used by many technical journals and to give a bit of advice about revision and resubmission of a paper that was not accepted after the first round of reviews. For young authors, the review process can be mysterious and frustrating. Criticisms conveyed in anonymous reviews may feel like personal attacks, while terse or vague comments may seem to provide little guidance for revision. This article provides a set of practical guidelines that can help you succeed in publishing good research. This includes a brief overview of the review process, as well as some hints about interpreting reviews, and suggestions for preparing a response to the reviews. The opinions below have evolved over several years, through numerous interactions with authors, reviewers, and members of editorial boards. They are meant only to convey practical hints for success and not as value judgments about the process. Finally, they represent only one viewpoint. Newcomers to the process would do well to solicit the advice and opinions of a variety of senior researchers.

S. Hutchinson, “Surviving the Review Process”, IEEE Robotics and Automation Magazine, December 2010, pp. 101, 103-104.

Download [93KB PDF]

Robotics and Control Chapter Seminar

Monday, January 3rd, 2011

2011_01_20_robocup

Title:

Use of Computer Vision in Robotics Competitions: A Case Study for Humanoid Robots

Date:

Thursday, January 20, 2010 at 4:00 PM – 5:00 PM

Location:

E3 – 262 EITC, Senate Chambers, Fort Garry Campus, University of Manitoba

Speaker:

Dr. Jacky Baltes and Dr. Chi Tai Cheng
Autonomous Agents Lab
Department of Computer Science
University of Manitoba

Abstract:

In recent years, international robotic soccer competitions such as FIRA WorldCup and the RoboCup competition have greatly gained in popularity. They provide a challenge problem for many areas of mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, and computer science in a fun and motivating format. Since many teams rely on cameras to detect objects such as the goals, balls, and opponents, there has been significant research into practical real-time computer vision methods by many teams. The talk will focus on the methods that robotic soccer teams have developed to solve computer vision problems in the robotic games domains. Various developments for both global vision as well as local vision based approaches will be discussed. Open problems and current approaches to solving these problems will be highlighted. The talk will also discuss how the FIRA HuroCup competition (an octathlon of robot-dash, marathon, penalty kick, lift and carry, basket-ball, obstacle run, weight-lifting, and a climbing wall) attempts to maintain relevance for researchers by providing a continuously evolving set of benchmark problem for small humanoid robots. The talk will also give an overview of recent developments of Archie, the only 1.4m tall walking humanoid robot in Canada.

Speaker Bio:

Dr. Jacky Baltes is a Full Professor in the department of computer science at the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada. Dr. Baltes was born and grew up in Munich, Germany. He is a three time national champion in speed skating and participated at the 1984 and 1988 Olympic games. Dr. Baltes received his Ph.D. in 1996 from the University of Calgary, Canada in the area of artificial intelligence and machine learning. For his Ph.D., Dr. Baltes developed a learning multi-strategy planning system called DoLittle. From 1996 to 2002, Dr. Baltes worked as a senior lecturer in the department of computer science at the University of Auckland, New Zealand. In 2002, Dr. Baltes moved to the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada. Dr. Baltes and his students have participated at international robotics competitions for robotic soccer and urban search and rescue since 1998. His teams won honours in the FIRA HuroCup humanoid robot competition (HuroCup 2002, 2003,and 2004), RoboCup E-League (1st Place 2004), and RoboCup humanoid league (2002, 2003). Dr. Baltes has published extensively and was on the program committee for several international conferences. He is a vice president of the Federation International of Robotic Soccer (FIRA), chair of the International HuroCup competition. He is an executive committee member of the International RoboCup Federation and co-chair of the RoboCup humanoid league competition. He is also a a member of the steering committee of the and the International Robot Olympiad (IRO).

Dr. Cheng graduated from Tamkung University, Tamshui, Taiwan in 2008. After spending his mandatory year with the Taiwanese military, he joined Institute for Information Industry, Taipei, Taiwan. In the summer of 2010, he joined the Autonomous Agents Lab at the University of Manitoba to work on small and large humanoid robots. Dr. Cheng has been the team leader of several winning teams at the FIRA and RoboCup robot competitions.

Cost:

Free, All are welcome.

Organizers:

  • IEEE Computer & Computational Intelligence Chapter
  • IEEE Robotics and Control Chapter
  • Institute of Industrial Mathematical Sciences

Contact:

For questions or more information contact Nariman Sepehri, at 474-9821.

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