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IEEE Waves Chapter Seminar – October 13, 2017

Friday, September 8th, 2017

IEEE Winnipeg Waves Chapter (APS/MTTS/VTS) is pleased to present:

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Seminar Title: Multiphysics Modeling in Computational Electromagnetics: Technical Challenges and Potential Solutions

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Speaker: Prof. Jian-Ming Jin

IEEE Distinguished Lecturer—Antennas and Propagation Society

Professor, ECE Department, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

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Date: Friday, October 13, 2017 at 11.15 AM

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Location:  EITC E1-270 (Fort Garry Campus; Engineering Building)

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Abstract of the Presentation: As computational methods for solving Maxwell’s equations become mature, the time has come to tackle much more challenging multiphysics problems, which have a great range of applications in sciences and technologies. In this presentation, we will use four examples to illustrate the nature and modeling of multiphysics problems. The first example concerns the heat problem in integrated circuits due to electromagnetic dissipated power, which requires an electrical-thermal co-simulation. The second example considers modeling of monolithic microwave integrated circuits, which consist of both distributive and lumped circuit components. The third is the simulation of vacuum electronic devices using the particle-in-cell method, which solves Maxwell’s equations and particle kinetic equation, and the fourth example simulates the air and dielectric breakdown in high-power microwave devices by coupling electromagnetic modeling with various plasma models. With these examples, we will discuss the methodologies and some of the challenges and potential solutions in multiphysics modeling.

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Biography of the Speaker: Prof. Jian-Ming Jin is Y. T. Lo Chair Professor in Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director of the Electromagnetics Laboratory and Center for Computational Electromagnetics at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He has authored and co-authored over 250 papers in refereed journals and over 20 book chapters. He has also authored The Finite Element Method in Electromagnetics, Electromagnetic Analysis and Design in Magnetic Resonance Imaging, and Theory and Computation of Electromagnetic Fields, co-authored Computation of Special Functions, Finite Element Analysis of Antennas and Arrays, and Fast and Efficient Algorithms in Computational Electromagnetics. His name often appeared in the University of Illinois’s List of Excellent Instructors. He was elected by ISI among world’s most cited authors in 2002. He is a Fellow of IEEE, Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES), and Electromagnetics Academy. Recently, he received the 2014 ACES Technical Achievement Award, 2015 IEEE Antennas and Propagation Society Chen-To Tai Distinguished Educator Award, and 2016 ACES Computational Electromagnetics Award.

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Please contact Puyan Mojabi for more information.

Waves Chapter Seminar – LTE on Unlicensed Band – February 22, 2017

Saturday, February 11th, 2017

IEEE Winnipeg Waves Chapter (APS/MTTS/VTS) is pleased to present:

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Seminar Title: LTE on Unlicensed Band

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Speaker: Prof. Geoffrey Ye Li

IEEE Distinguished Lecturer—Vehicular Technology Society (VTS)

Professor, ECE Department, Georgia Tech.

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Date: Wednesday, Feb 22, 2017 at 11.15 AM

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Location:  EITC E1-270 (Fort Garry Campus; Engineering Building)

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Abstract of the Presentation: Future 5G cellular networks are facing the challenging task on increasing their capacity dramatically. Despite some cutting-edge capacity-approaching techniques, the limited licensed spectrum is still a major bottleneck for capacity improvement. To tackle this issue, a new standard has been developed within 3GPP for LTE systems, currently on the licensed bands, to operate on the unlicensed bands, which is called LTE on unlicensed bands (LTE-U). LTE has many advanced techniques, which can be exploited in the unlicensed bands to achieve a high spectral efficiency. However, the unlicensed bands are currently occupied by the widely-deployed WiFi networks.  The major challenge on LTE-U is how to design fair and efficient coexistence mechanisms between LTE and WiFi networks. In this talk, we will first discuss traditional traffic offloading, resource sharing, and hybrid of the both for LTE users to optimally exploit unlicensed bands while guaranteeing of the QoS of the existing WiFi users. To improve both the LTE and WiFi users simultaneously and achieve a win-win situation, we then provide a novel traffic offloading strategy, which is just opposite to the traditional one and offloads some WiFi users to the LTE networks and at the same time relinquishes some unlicensed bands to LTE-U. Since the unlicensed bands are usually operated less energy-efficiently than the licensed ones due to the higher carrier frequency of the unlicensed bands and larger pass-loss, we also present a framework for energy-efficiency (EE) optimization in LTE-U. We establish a criterion to determine whether the EE of the LTE system can be improved with the help of the unlicensed bands. Based on the criterion, we then develop a joint licensed and unlicensed resource allocation algorithm to maximize the EE of each LTE small cell base station.

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Biography of the Speaker: Dr. Geoffrey Li is a Professor with the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering at Georgia Institute of Technology. He is also holding a Cheung Kong Scholar title at the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China since 2006. He was with AT&T Labs – Research for five years before joining Georgia Tech in 2000. His general research interests include wireless communications and statistical signal processing. In these areas, he has published over 300 referred journal and conference papers in addition to 26 granted patents. His publications have been cited by over 24,000 times and he has been listed as the World’s Most Influential Scientific Mind, also known as a Highly-Cited Researcher, by Thomson Reuters. He has been an IEEE Fellow since 2006. He received the Stephen O. Rice Prize Paper Award in 2010 and the WTC Wireless Recognition Award in 2013 from the IEEE Communications Society and the James Evans Avant Garde Award in 2013 and the Jack Neubauer Memorial Award in 2014 from the IEEE Vehicular Technology Society. Recently, he won 2015 Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award from the School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Tech.

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IEEE Winnipeg Waves Chapter – An Exploration of Radiation Physics – May 10, 2016

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

IEEE Winnipeg Waves Chapter is pleased to present:

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Seminar Title: AN EXPLORATION OF RADIATION PHYSICS

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Speaker: Dr. Edmund Miller

IEEE Distinguished Lecturer—Antennas and Propagation Society

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Date: Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 2.30 PM

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Location:  EITC E2-350 (Fort Garry Campus; Engineering Building)

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Abstract of the Presentation: All external electromagnetic fields arise from the process of radiation.  There would be no radiated, propagated or scattered fields were it not for this phenomenon.  In spite of this self-evident truth, our understanding of how and why radiation occurs seems relatively superficial from a practical viewpoint.  It’s true that physical reasoning and mathematical analysis via the Lienard-Wiechert potentials show that radiation occurs due to charge acceleration.  It’s also true that it is possible to determine the near and far fields of rather complex objects subject to arbitrary excitation, making it possible to perform analysis and design of EM systems.  However, if the task is to determine the spatial distribution of radiation from the surface of a given object from such solutions, the answer becomes less obvious.

 

One way to think about this problem might be to ask, were our eyes sensitive to X-band frequencies and capable of resolving source distributions a few wavelengths in extent, what would be the image of such simple objects as dipoles, circular loops, conical spirals, log-periodic structures, continuous conducting surfaces, etc. when excited as antennas or scatterers? Various kinds of measurements, analyses and computations have been made over the years that bear on this question.  This lecture will summarize some relevant observations concerning radiation physics in both the time and frequency domains for a variety of observables, noting that there is no unanimity of opinion about some of these issues.  Included in the discussion will be various energy measures related to radiation, the implications of Poynting-vector fields along and near wire objects, and the inferences that can be made from far radiation fields. Associated with the latter, a technique developed by the author called FARS (Far-field Analysis of Radiation Sources) will be summarized and demonstrated in both the frequency and time domains for a variety of simple geometries. Also to be discussed is the so-called E-field kink model, an approach that illustrates graphically the physical behavior encapsulated in the Lienard-Wiechert potentials. Brief computer movies based on the kink model will be included for several different kinds of charge motion to demonstrate the radiation process.

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Biography of the Speaker: Since earning his PhD in Electrical Engineering at the University of Michigan, E. K. Miller has held a variety of government, academic and industrial positions.  These include 15 years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where he spent 7 years as a Division Leader, and 4+ years at Los Alamos National Laboratory from which he retired as a Group Leader in 1993.  His academic experience includes holding a position as Regents-Distinguished Professor at Kansas University and as Stocker Visiting Professor at Ohio University.  Dr. Miller wrote the column “PCs for AP and Other EM Reflections” for the AP-S Magazine from 1984 to 2000.  He received (with others) a Certificate of Achievement from the IEEE Electromagnetic Compatibility Society for Contributions to Development of NEC (Numerical Electromagnetics Code) and was a recipient (with others) in 1989 of the best paper award given by the Education Society for “Computer Movies for Education.”

 

He served as Editor or Associate Editor of IEEE Potentials Magazine from 1985 to 2005 for which he wrote a regular column “On the Job,” and in connection with which he was a member of the IEEE Technical Activities Advisory Committee of the Education Activities Board and a member of the IEEE Student Activities Committee.  He was a member of the 1992 Technical Program Committee (TPC) for the MTT Symposium in Albuquerque, NM, and Guest Editor of the Special Symposium Issue of the IEEE MTT Society Transactions for that meeting.  In 1994 he served as a Guest Associate Editor of the Optical Society of America Journal special issue “On 3 Dimensional Electromagnetic Scattering.” He was involved in the beginning of the IEEE Magazine “Computing in Science and Engineering” (originally called Computational Science and Engineering) for which he has served as Area Editor or Editor-at-Large.  Dr. Miller has lectured at numerous short courses in various venues, such as Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES), AP-S, MTT-S and local IEEE chapter/section meetings, and at NATO Lecture Series and Advanced Study Institutes.

 

Dr. Miller edited the book “Time-Domain Measurements in Electromagnetics”, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, NY, 1986 and was co-editor of the IEEE Press book Computational Electromagnetics:  Frequency-Domain Moment Methods, 1991.  He was organizer and first President of the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES) for which he also served two terms on the Board of Directors.  He served a term as Chairman of Commission A of US URSI and is or has been a member of Commissions B, C, and F, has been on the TPC for the URSI Electromagnetic Theory Symposia in 1992 and 2001, and was elected as a member of the US delegation to several URSI General Assemblies.  He is a Life Fellow of IEEE from which he received the IEEE Third Millennium Medal in 2000 and is a Fellow of ACES.  His research interests include scientific visualization, model-based parameter estimation, the physics of electromagnetic radiation, validation of computational software, and numerical modeling about which he has published more than 150 articles and book chapters.  He is listed in Who’s Who in the West, Who’s Who in Technology, American Men and Women of Science and Who’s Who in America.

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Seminar: An Exploration of Radiation Physics

Wednesday, May 4th, 2016

IEEE Winnipeg Waves Chapter is pleased to present:

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Seminar Title: AN EXPLORATION OF RADIATION PHYSICS

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Speaker: Dr. Edmund Miller

IEEE Distinguished Lecturer—Antennas and Propagation Society

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Date: Tuesday, May 10, 2016 at 2.30 PM

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Location:  EITC E2-350 (Fort Garry Campus; Engineering Building)

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Abstract of the Presentation: All external electromagnetic fields arise from the process of radiation.  There would be no radiated, propagated or scattered fields were it not for this phenomenon.  In spite of this self-evident truth, our understanding of how and why radiation occurs seems relatively superficial from a practical viewpoint.  It’s true that physical reasoning and mathematical analysis via the Lienard-Wiechert potentials show that radiation occurs due to charge acceleration.  It’s also true that it is possible to determine the near and far fields of rather complex objects subject to arbitrary excitation, making it possible to perform analysis and design of EM systems.  However, if the task is to determine the spatial distribution of radiation from the surface of a given object from such solutions, the answer becomes less obvious.

 

One way to think about this problem might be to ask, were our eyes sensitive to X-band frequencies and capable of resolving source distributions a few wavelengths in extent, what would be the image of such simple objects as dipoles, circular loops, conical spirals, log-periodic structures, continuous conducting surfaces, etc. when excited as antennas or scatterers? Various kinds of measurements, analyses and computations have been made over the years that bear on this question.  This lecture will summarize some relevant observations concerning radiation physics in both the time and frequency domains for a variety of observables, noting that there is no unanimity of opinion about some of these issues.  Included in the discussion will be various energy measures related to radiation, the implications of Poynting-vector fields along and near wire objects, and the inferences that can be made from far radiation fields. Associated with the latter, a technique developed by the author called FARS (Far-field Analysis of Radiation Sources) will be summarized and demonstrated in both the frequency and time domains for a variety of simple geometries. Also to be discussed is the so-called E-field kink model, an approach that illustrates graphically the physical behavior encapsulated in the Lienard-Wiechert potentials. Brief computer movies based on the kink model will be included for several different kinds of charge motion to demonstrate the radiation process.

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Biography of the Speaker: Since earning his PhD in Electrical Engineering at the University of Michigan, E. K. Miller has held a variety of government, academic and industrial positions.  These include 15 years at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory where he spent 7 years as a Division Leader, and 4+ years at Los Alamos National Laboratory from which he retired as a Group Leader in 1993.  His academic experience includes holding a position as Regents-Distinguished Professor at Kansas University and as Stocker Visiting Professor at Ohio University.  Dr. Miller wrote the column “PCs for AP and Other EM Reflections” for the AP-S Magazine from 1984 to 2000.  He received (with others) a Certificate of Achievement from the IEEE Electromagnetic Compatibility Society for Contributions to Development of NEC (Numerical Electromagnetics Code) and was a recipient (with others) in 1989 of the best paper award given by the Education Society for “Computer Movies for Education.”

 

He served as Editor or Associate Editor of IEEE Potentials Magazine from 1985 to 2005 for which he wrote a regular column “On the Job,” and in connection with which he was a member of the IEEE Technical Activities Advisory Committee of the Education Activities Board and a member of the IEEE Student Activities Committee.  He was a member of the 1992 Technical Program Committee (TPC) for the MTT Symposium in Albuquerque, NM, and Guest Editor of the Special Symposium Issue of the IEEE MTT Society Transactions for that meeting.  In 1994 he served as a Guest Associate Editor of the Optical Society of America Journal special issue “On 3 Dimensional Electromagnetic Scattering.” He was involved in the beginning of the IEEE Magazine “Computing in Science and Engineering” (originally called Computational Science and Engineering) for which he has served as Area Editor or Editor-at-Large.  Dr. Miller has lectured at numerous short courses in various venues, such as Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES), AP-S, MTT-S and local IEEE chapter/section meetings, and at NATO Lecture Series and Advanced Study Institutes.

 

Dr. Miller edited the book “Time-Domain Measurements in Electromagnetics”, Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York, NY, 1986 and was co-editor of the IEEE Press book Computational Electromagnetics:  Frequency-Domain Moment Methods, 1991.  He was organizer and first President of the Applied Computational Electromagnetics Society (ACES) for which he also served two terms on the Board of Directors.  He served a term as Chairman of Commission A of US URSI and is or has been a member of Commissions B, C, and F, has been on the TPC for the URSI Electromagnetic Theory Symposia in 1992 and 2001, and was elected as a member of the US delegation to several URSI General Assemblies.  He is a Life Fellow of IEEE from which he received the IEEE Third Millennium Medal in 2000 and is a Fellow of ACES.  His research interests include scientific visualization, model-based parameter estimation, the physics of electromagnetic radiation, validation of computational software, and numerical modeling about which he has published more than 150 articles and book chapters.  He is listed in Who’s Who in the West, Who’s Who in Technology, American Men and Women of Science and Who’s Who in America.

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Seminar: Parallel-MLFMA Solutions with Prof. Levent Gürel

Friday, July 17th, 2015

IEEE Winnipeg Waves Chapter is pleased to present:

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Seminar Title: Parallel-MLFMA Solutions of Large-Scale Problems Involving Dielectric and Composite Metamaterial Structures

Speaker: Prof. Levent Gürel

CEO, ABAKUS Computing Technologies

Adjunct Professor, Dept. of ECE, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign

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Date: Friday, July 17, 2015, at 10:30 AM

Location:  EITC E1-270 (Fort Garry Campus; Engineering Building)

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Abstract of the Presentation:

It is possible to solve extremely large electromagnetics problems accurately and efficiently by using the multilevel fast multipole algorithm (MLFMA) and parallel MLFMA.  This has important implications in terms of obtaining the solution of previously intractable physical, real-life, and scientific problems in various areas, such as (subsurface) scattering, optics, bioelectromagnetics, metamaterials, nanotechnology, remote sensing, etc.  Accurate simulations of such real-life electromagnetics problems with integral equations require the solution of dense matrix equations involving millions of unknowns.  Most recently, we have achieved the solutions of larger than 1,000,000,000×1,000,000,000 (one billion!) dense matrix equations!  Solutions of these extremely large problems cannot be achieved easily, even when using the most powerful computers with state-of-the-art technology.  Instead, we have been solving some of the world’s largest integral-equation problems in computational electromagnetics by employing fast algorithms implemented on parallel computers.  For more information: www.abakus.computing.technology.

In this talk, following a general introduction to our work in computational electromagnetics, I will present integral-equation and MLFMA formulations of dielectric/composite structures.  Then, I will continue with rigorous modeling of three-dimensional optical metamaterial and plasmonic structures that are composed of multiple coexisting dielectric and/or conducting parts.  Such composite structures may possess diverse values of conductivities and dielectric constants, including negative permittivity and permeability.  It is possible to formulate and use different types of integral equations depending on which ones have better conditioning properties.  I will briefly mention the development of effective Schur-complement preconditioners specifically for dielectric problems.  Solutions of complicated real-life problems involving metamaterial structures, red blood cells, and dielectric photonic crystals will be presented.  If time permits, various challenges encountered during the solutions may be touched upon.

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Biography of the Speaker:

Prof. Levent Gürel (Fellow of IEEE, ACES, and EMA) received the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) in 1988 and 1991, respectively, in electrical and computer engineering.  He worked at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York, in 1991-94.  During his 20 years with Bilkent University, he served as the Founding Director of the Computational Electromagnetics Research Center (BiLCEM) and a professor of electrical engineering.  He is also an Adjunct Professor at UIUC.  Prof. Gürel is the Founder and CEO of ABAKUS Computing Technologies, a company that is geared towards advancing the use of cutting-edge computing technologies for solving difficult scientific problems with important real-life applications and societal benefits.  He is conferred the UIUC ECE Distinguished Alumni Award in 2013 and the IEEE Harrington-Mittra Award in Computational Electromagnetics in 2015.  He was named an IEEE Distinguished Lecturer for 2011-2014 and is still serving in emeritus capacity.  He was invited to address the 2011 ACES Conference as a Plenary Speaker and a TEDx Conference in 2014.  Among other recognitions of Prof. Gürel’s accomplishments, the two prestigious awards from the Turkish Academy of Sciences (TUBA) in 2002 and theScientific and Technological Research Council of Turkey (TUBITAK) in 2003 are the most notable.  Since 2003, Prof. Gürel has been serving as an associate editor for Radio Science, IEEE Antennas and Wireless Propagation Letters, IET Microwaves, Antennas & Propagation, JEMWA, PIER, ACES Journal, and ACES Express.

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